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Submission + - Origin of Neil Armstrong's 'One Small Step' Line Revealed (

SchrodingerZ writes: "In an upcoming BBC Documentary, Dean Armstrong, the brother of astronaut Neil Armstrong, reveals when the world famous 'one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind' line originated. For years, people have argued over when Armstrong came up with the line, whether it was on the spot or planned years ahead. Also debated is whether Armstrong meant to include 'a' before man, making the indefinite article 'man', which alludes to mankind, into a singular, 'a man', himself. According to Dean Armstrong, the quote was shared to him over a board game, months before the mission began. He says, 'We started playing Risk and then he [Neil] slipped me a piece of paper and said 'read that’. I did. On that piece of paper there was 'That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind’. He says 'what do you think about that?’ I said 'fabulous’. He said 'I thought you might like that, but I wanted you to read it’. He then added: 'It was 'that is one small step for A man’'. Armstrong had always insisted that he had said 'a', that that it was lost in communication static. This new story however conflicts with what Neil told James Hansen for his biography, stating he came up with the quote on the lunar surface. More on the historic moon landing and the life of Neil Armstrong in the new documentary Neil Armstrong- First Man on the Moon, on BBC."

Submission + - Rep. Darrell Issa requests public comments on ACTA (

langelgjm writes: After repeated dismissals by the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, Congressman Darrell Issa has taken matters into his own hands by posting a copy of ACTA, online and asking for public comments. ACTA, the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement, is a secretly negotiated multilateral trade treaty with the potential for profoundly affecting the Internet. "ACTA represents as great a threat to an open Internet as SOPA and PIPA and was drafted with even less transparency and input from digital citizens," Issa said. You can comment here.

Submission + - Intel recieves record fine by the EU ( 2

Firefalcon writes: "Intel has been fined a record 1.06 billion euros ($1.45 billion / £948 million) by the European Competition Commission after being found guilty of anti-competitive practices. This makes Microsoft's 497 million euro fine in 2004 (which was a record at the time) seem like a slap on the hand. Reports had previously suggested that the fine would be similar to Microsoft's. Intel was charged (among other things) with encouraging manufacturers and retailers to purchase fewer (or even not stock) AMD processors. More details of the ruling are on the European Commission's Competition website."

Submission + - Chileans protest Microsoft deal with Government

chileno writes: "Last May, the Chilean Government got a 40% discount on licenses of Microsoft products. The trade-off? A deal where Microsoft will provide a "Digital home" to all citizens, based on Live. Things can get worse: they'll set the comunication standard with the government not only for PC's but also to mobile phones. Since this deal was known, there's been a reaction on the web never seen before. A site to coordinate all this efforts is up, including channels in Flickr, You Tube and Last.FM. Even a letter to the President is on the way. You can sign it here ."

Submission + - Sprint boots 200 US soldiers for using their phone (

Tech.Luver writes: "Sprint boots 200 American patriots for using their phones: ( uses_soldiers_of_excessive_roaming/ ) " Shortly after they returned home from the war in Iraq, Sprint accused 200 American soldiers of excessive roaming and summarily canceled their wireless service. At least, that's the word from one of these embattled national heroes. According to our war veteran, who recently posted his story to the forum at, the 200 troopers were roaming excessively because Sprint doesn't provide wireless coverage in West Point, home to the U.S. Military Academy. "Why on earth I can't get coverage at the United States Military Academy, 40 minutes away from New York City is a mystery to me," he says. He also points out that Sprint's coverage map puts West Point in the "best" category. ""

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