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Submission + - Google drops support for Jabber in latest Hangouts (paritynews.com) 1

hypnosec writes: Google is busy replacing its Talk chat client with the recently announced Hangouts, which was introduced last week at the Google I/O 2013 conference and will bring an end to Talk, Google+ Messenger and the original Google+ Hangouts. The new app, available as a Chrome extension as well as for Android, iOS, and Windows, has a serious disadvantage to the previous Talk client – it doesn’t support the XMPP open source chat protocol aka Jabber. Support for XMPP allowed Talk to communicate to XMPP accounts that were not registered with Google servers thereby allowing users to communicate with their contacts outside of Google.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What Does It Take to Become a Software Engineer? 2

Jeheto writes: "I’ve always had an interest in IT, and now I’m at the point where I can choose my career. I’m currently a freshman college student trying to decide between Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as a major. I’m about to take my A+ certification, I have a few years of high school level training in electronics theory/soldering, and I know a just the smallest bit of Python from working with the MITOpenCourseWare program. I’m equally interested in networking, electrical engineering, and programming. My question to Slashdot is, what should I learn?"

Submission + - Paralyzed woman uses mind-controlled robot arm (extremetech.com)

MrSeb writes: "Using BrainGate, the world’s most advanced brain-computer interface, a woman with quadriplegia has used a mind-controlled robot arm to serve herself coffee — an act she hasn’t been able to perform for 15 years. BrainGate, which is being developed by a team of American neuroscientists from Brown and Stanford universities, and is currently undergoing clinical trial, requires a computer chip to be implanted in the motor cortex of the patient, which it then transmits to a computer for processing. Like all brain-computer interfaces, the user must train the software — but once this is done, you simply think of a movement, and the software moves the robot accordingly. Moving forward, the researchers would like to miniaturize the system and make it wireless — at the moment, BrainGate users have a box attached to their head, and they're tethered to a computer — which is OK for robot arm use at home, but obviously doesn't grant much mobility. The work was partly funded by DARPA, with the hope of creating more advanced prosthetics for wounded war veterans."

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