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User Journal

Journal Journal: Linux PXE server P2V: Debian Testing + Vmware Workstation 11

Keeping older hardware useful:
P2V and V2P with an old Debian Testing PXE server and Vmware Workstation 11
By Dave Bechtel / Kingneutron

MARCH 2017 â" so I've had an old PXE server (an âoeASUS S-pressoâ - Pentium-4, 32-bit portable box) sitting around for the last few years, and got a wild hair to do a P2V on it â" make sure it still works right and test an upgrade of Debian Testing to modern standards. Last time this box was booted was November 2013 â" and it was provisioned with Dreamlinux 5 back in January of 2012.

--Thankfully, the SATA drive and CMOS battery have survived with apparently no ill effects, since the box has been moved around through a couple of house changes with no special storage arrangements â" it's basically been unpowered sitting in a corner.

( My unit has a PCI slot on the right that has a Gig Ethernet card in it, and an unused AGP video card slot on the left. Motherboard only supports 100Mbit Ether. )

--Rather than using the antiquated PS/2 ports, I used an adapter to combine a USB keyboard and mouse into (1) USB port.

STEP 1: BACKUP the physical PC

--This box is so old, I had to install fsarchiver (my preferred backup) manually. Incidentally, it's also heavy as hell with a DVD drive and a standard SATA hard drive, so removing the DVD and converting to an SSD (or laptop drive) to save weight would be recommended if I wanted to haul it around.

(Physical box, bash shell, as root)
# apt-get update; apt-get install fsarchiver

# ddir=/mnt/extra
# outfile=spresso-p2v-backup-20170302.fsarchive.fsa
# rootdev=/dev/sda3

# time fsarchiver -o -A -z 1 -j 2 savefs \
    $ddir/$outfile \
    $rootdev

# cd $ddir
# fsarchiver archinfo $outfile 2> flist--$outfile.txt

--I then copied âoespresso-p2v-backup-20170302.fsarchive.fsaâ to my ZFS server (method omitted), since we will need it later for the restore.

--Also, since all of my Squid cache and ISO files for PXE are on /mnt/extra, I made a tar backup of those to my ZFS server.

# cd /mnt/extra
# time tar czpf /mnt/bkpspace/spresso-mnt-extra-bkp-20170302.tgz *

-------------

STEP 2: Setup the P2V VM in Vmware Workstation 11 and restore the backup

--I tried as much as possible to duplicate the physical box, but in this case I already had a P2V VM of my daily workstation (Ubuntu 14.04) that I wasn't using, so adding a 3rd virtual drive to the existing VM and re-using the existing GRUB saved me some steps. Running ' update-grub ' on the Ubuntu side after restoring enabled me to boot my restored environment.

VM details:

RAM: 1.5GB
Processors: 1
SCSI1: 23.5GB (this is the Ubuntu drive)
SCSI2: 20GB ( this is /home and swap )
SCSI3: added as new and then Expanded from 10GB to 60GB (after running out of space)

Net1: Bridged (gets DHCP address from my LAN)
Net2: Started out as Host-only and ended up as LAN Segment â" this enabled the âoeclientâ bare VM to boot over the network.

--I used Systemrescuecd to boot the VM, issued ' startx ' and used ' gparted ' to make 2 partitions that fairly closely matched my physical layout.

PROTIP: In hindsight, I should have made the root partition around 15-20GB because of all the package upgrades that needed to be downloaded. (I ran out of space on root once during the upgrade and had to issue an ' apt-get clean ' to free up space.)

sdc3: 10GB ext4 (restored root) â" make yours bigger.
sdc4: 50GB ext4 (/mnt/extra)

PROTIP: ' tune2fs -m1 /dev/sdc3 ' -- this will reduce the reserved space for ext4 and give you some extra usable free space.

--Now, since I had plenty of space to work with, I copied my fsarchive backup file from my ZFS server to the 50GB VM partition.

(still in Systemrescuecd, in the VM)

# mkdir /mnt/tmp
# mount /dev/sdc4 /mnt/tmp
# cd /mnt/tmp

# ifconfig # Make note of my IP address
# nc -l -p 32100 |tar xpvf -
##Netcat - Listen on port 32100 and untar

(Now on my ZFS server)
# tar cpf - spresso-p2v-backup-20170302.fsarchive.fsa |nc -w 5 192.168.1.95 32100
## (tar to stdout and stream a copy of the backup file to the VM's IP address)

--This is basically a quick-and-dirty way to transfer files over the network without resorting to FTP or slow SSH file copies â" the fsarchive backup file ended up being around 3GB and transferred in less than a minute over Gig Ethernet.

--Now to restore the backup:

(still in Systemrescuecd, in the VM)
# time fsarchiver restfs spresso*.fsa id=0,dest=/dev/sdc4

--And that's half the battle right there. Now we just need to make some changes to the restored /etc/fstab so it will boot. ( If we were doing a full migration, we would also need to adjust things like /etc/network/interfaces , /etc/rc.local , /etc/hostname , /etc/hosts )

--For completeness, here's more info on how to do a Linux bare-metal backup and restore:
http://crunchbang.org/forums/viewtopic.php?id=24268

--So now I ' reboot ' into the VM's already-installed Ubuntu 14.04 and edit my Dreamlinux /etc/fstab.

# mkdir /mnt/tmp
# mount /dev/sdc3 /mnt/tmp

# screen -aAO # PROTIP: GNU screen is invaluable for switching between virtual terminal windows

# fdisk -l # check out our disks
# blkid # get partition labels and UUIDs /dev/sdb2: LABEL="swapb" UUID="f0eb7148-4ff2-4eeb-a82c-349d384a5255" TYPE="swap" PARTUUID="ff1ca075-02" /dev/sdc3: LABEL="root" UUID="38f1d4be-3293-4272-ab79-4ad76cbd5a36" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="3a3b65f3-03" /dev/sdc4: LABEL="extra" UUID="603a61fc-4436-4cb0-baac-ef9170754228" TYPE="ext4" PARTUUID="3a3b65f3-04"

--NOTE that fsarchiver will by default restore the same UUID and filesystem label, so no worries.

( Now Hit Ctrl-A, then c to create a new Screen )

# cd /mnt/tmp/etc
# jstar fstab # use your own editor here, I happen to like Wordstar key bindings ;-)

--Now we can switch between those 2 virtual terminal windows and even copy/paste text without using the mouse. See ' man screen ' for more details.

--To make a long story short, I added or verified the following to SpressoVM's /etc/fstab to enable my existing swap partition and double-check that the root filesystem would be mounted as expected.

LABEL=swapb none swap sw,pri=2 0 0
LABEL=extra /mnt/extra ext4 defaults,noatime,rw 0 2

--While I'm here, I also restored the /mnt/extra files from their tar backup as well.

# umount /mnt/tmp # we're done with restored root

# mount /dev/sdc4 /mnt/tmp
# cd /mnt/tmp
# nc -l -p 32100 | tar xzpvf -

( then on my ZFS Server )

# cd /mnt/bkpspace; time cat spresso-mnt-extra-bkp-20170302.tgz |nc -w 5 192.168.1.95 32100

( now back in the VM )

# update-grub # make sure ubuntu knows how to boot dreamlinux
# reboot

--And that's pretty much it. After that, to make a long story short, I went through several cycles of
' apt-get upgrade ' and ' apt-get dist-upgrade ' making VM Snapshots along the way, and had to make allowances for files that were provided in more than one package.

--I also upgraded the kernel from 3.10-3-686-pae to linux-image-4.9.0-1-686. The full saga is documented with errors and fixes, so email me if you want to know more (but it's a pretty long read.)

# apt-cache search 4.9.0 |awk '{print $1}'

# apt-get install linux-headers-4.9.0-1-686 linux-headers-4.9.0-1-686-pae linux-headers-4.9.0-1-all \
linux-headers-4.9.0-1-common linux-support-4.9.0-1 linux-image-4.9.0-1-686-pae

STEP 3: Test PXE booting with another VM using a dedicated network segment

--The end result of all this: I created a âoeblankâ VM with the capability to boot from network (needed to modify the VM's BIOS for this) and after switching the 2nd network adapter to âoeLAN segmentâ I successfully booted the VM from PXE! Mission Accomplished!
--Now, since I've done all the heavy lifting in the VM and my original box is still working the same as it was (but running old software) I can use pretty much the same procedure to do a V2P (Virtual to Physical) to a spare 500GB laptop drive instead of having to repeat the upgrade all over again.

--For brevity, these are the instructions I include in my bkpsys-2fsarchive script:

# time fsarchiver restfs backup-root-sda1--ubuntu1404*.fsa id=0,dest=/dev/sdf1
Statistics for filesystem 0
* files successfully processed:....regfiles=159387, directories=25579, symlinks=49276, hardlinks=25, specials=108
* files with errors:...............regfiles=0, directories=0, symlinks=0, hardlinks=0, specials=0
real 4m26.116s
( 3.9GB )

# mkdir /mnt/tmp2
# mount /dev/sdf1 /mnt/tmp2

# grub-install --root-directory=/mnt/tmp2 /dev/sdf
# mount -o bind /dev /mnt/tmp2/dev; mount -o bind /proc /mnt/tmp2/proc; mount -o bind /sys /mnt/tmp2/sys
# chroot /mnt/tmp2 /bin/bash
# update-grub
[[
Generating grub configuration file ...
Warning: Setting GRUB_TIMEOUT to a non-zero value when GRUB_HIDDEN_TIMEOUT is set is no longer supported.
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-4.2.0-36-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-4.2.0-36-generic
Found linux image: /boot/vmlinuz-3.19.0-25-generic
Found initrd image: /boot/initrd.img-3.19.0-25-generic
Found memtest86+ image: /boot/memtest86+.elf
Found memtest86+ image: /boot/memtest86+.bin
Found Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (14.04) on /dev/sda1
done
]]

# grub-install /dev/sdf # from chroot

^D
# umount -a /mnt/tmp2/*

# DON'T FORGET TO COPY /home and adjust fstab for swap / home / squid BEFORE booting new drive!
# also adjust etc/network/interfaces , etc/rc.local , etc/hostname , etc/hosts

--Once I had Knoppix up and running in the âoeblankâ VM, I used ' gparted ' to make a 768MB Swap partition and used the rest as a âoedataâ ext4 partition.

--NOTE that while the PXE boxes are running a 32-bit processor and environment, CLIENT boxes can boot a 64-bit kernel and environment as long as the CLIENT processor is capable.

STEP 4: Reverse the process and upgrade the physical box

--I haven't done the âoeV2Pâ part yet, but that's not a high priority at this point since I have everything pretty much the way I like it right now.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Linux QL-500 Label Printer Update

While the Brother P-Touch QL-500 is recognized out of the box by Ubuntu, it doesn't really work. Do the following to fix:

1. Go to the Brother driver site and download both the LPR and CUPSWRAPPER driver. http://support.brother.com/g/s/id/linux/en/download_esp.html#QL-500
2. Install both with "sudo apt install ./ql500cupswrapper-1.0.1-0.i386.deb ./ql500lpr-1.0.1-0.i386.deb"

That works.

Ideally, download and use the font "OCR-B", which is freely available from here: http://www.fontpalace.com/font-download/OcrB+Regular/

User Journal

Journal Journal: Intel Wifi Crashing 3

Note to future self.

I was fiddling around with my laptop and broke something. My WiFi kept disconnecting every couple of minutes. A quick look in dmesg showed the iwlwifi kernel module was segfaulting every couple of minutes.

This was new. WTF had I changed? Reminder to self -- don't fiddle with things that matter when really tired.

As it turns out, I had enabled up the amd64-microcode in my system, which is under Additional Drivers in Ubuntu. This played absolute havoc with the Intel WiFi and provided no discernible benefits.

Uncheck box, reboot machine, problem resolved.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Ancestry.com Passwords 2

When attempting to change your password on the genealogy website Ancestry.com, you get this not-so-helpful message:

New Password -- Your new password should be between 5 to 24 characters long and can be any combination of letters, numbers, and some symbols.

Really. Some symbols. Not that they're going to tell you which ones. Oh no, that would be too easy. You have to guess!

The best I can figure out is some dev is just fucking with people for fun. Either that, or they had to spend way too much time writing escape code for special characters and this is payback.

For the record, so far I've determined that a period, hyphen, and underscore are all acceptable and a space is not. . - _

Ugh!

User Journal

Journal Journal: HOWTO safe rm in Linux 1

--HOWTO safe rm on Linux (at least):

- Interactive:
o Use Midnight Commander. Works from a text terminal, no GUI needed.
Insert to mark files/dirs, F8 to delete. Never had a misfire, even as root.

- Script (for the paranoid, and want a log):
IF you have a known dir " destdir=/tmp/blah " with a subdir " /tmp/blah/1 "
$ cd $destdir && cd 1 && cd .. && rm -rv 1/* |tee /tmp/rm.txt

- REALLY safe rm, with find:
# find multiple (known) names of files > 40 days old in a given directory and delete them
bkpath="/mnt/bkpdrive"
pathh="$bkpath/work/bkpsys-laptop-p2400-thinkpad-xubuntu-14-04-LTS--64--sda7"
cd $pathh && \
        find $pathh/* \( -name "bkp*gz" -o -name "bkp*bz2" -name "bkp*lzop" -o -name "flist*" \) -type f -mtime +40 -exec /bin/rm -v {} \;

--If you need to delete multiple levels of subdirectories, or dotfiles -- do it interactively, and use MC.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Thoughts on 007 - Spectre 2

No spoilers, just some quick comments.

It isn't bad, but it isn't great, either. Good enough is where I'd put it. Of the Daniel Craig Bond moves, I'd rank this one as #4 (of 4).

A couple of things that stick out at me were the early car chase scene. WTF people? Who wrote this? It wasn't so much a car chase as "lets watch expensive cars tool around Rome". No shooting, nothing exciting. Just what looked like an orange Lamborghini chasing whatever custom car Bond was driving. (Okay, it was a custom Jaguar C-X75 chasing a custom Aston-Martin DB10.)

See, Bond was driving a bullet-proof, armored car. WTF was he fleeing from? The bad guy couldn't get to him. He could've come to a complete stop, let the guy roll up, wave, and ask him to do his window and it wouldn't have mattered.

The second scene that bothered me was the train fight scene. Holy fuck! Are there no other people on the train? The bash their way through like 4 or 5 cars on a 7 car train and there aren't people scrambling to get out of the way. No staff, no passengers, nothing. It was like a ghost train. Then they get off at the next stop looking freshly showered and pressed, not like both protagonists just got their asses kicked and should be covered in bruises and welts and walking with severe limps.

The final scene that irked me was where Bond was chasing the cars in Austria with the plane. The plane loses its wings and a strut, then slides down the mountain only to bash through a barn and smash into one of the bad guys cars. And NO ONE IS OUTSIDE TO SEE IT! It is like they found the only Austrian ski resort village that IS TOTALLY DEVOID OF PEOPLE.

I guess they smashed up so many cars they had to save money somewhere, and skimped on the extras (except for the opening scene in Mexico City).

A little long, and a little disjoint. It really helped that I was at an Alamo Draft House and ordered a couple of beers while watching it.

All in all it really reminded me of a Roger Moore Bond as opposed to a Daniel Craig Bond. Not Moonraker bad, but still...

User Journal

Journal Journal: Ubuntu 15.10 Miscellaneous

A couple of other notes on Ubuntu 15.10 on my hacked-up HP ProBoox 6475b.

1. The fingerprint sensor is a Validity VFS491, 138a:003d. Validity Sensors was bought by Synaptec back in 2013, but regardless those sensors have never been well supported under Linux. I did get this one working by digging out the old driver patch that HP supplied for SuSE Linux 11 back in 2012. I applied that to libfprint-0.0.6 and compiled everything from source. Ugly, but it works. I forwarded the patch over to the fingerprint-gui guys to see if they are interested in adding it in. Every little bit helps.

2. Playing with my Yubikey Neo I found that the pam-u2f package in the PPA (v1.0.2) segfaults on the pamu2fcfg command. I filed a bug report, provided debug and core data, and the developers patched the git HEAD source in a few hours. I rebuilt the utility and supporting libraries from scratch to test and all is working! Score one for open source software! Expect it to be released on the PPA next week.

That was really the last little nit. Everything went much smoother than I expected, and I'm quite happy with the setup. Every last feature on the machine works without a hiccup -- except the WiFI scanner, but that isn't part of the machine.

I'm actually fairly impressed with the open source AMD video drivers (Radeon 7660G, which comes with the A-10 processor), but don't play games on the machine other than WarZone 2100 so I don't really stress it.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Ubuntu 15.10 and Epson / Seiko Scanner Driver

I've tried everything, but can't connect to the scanner over WiFi. I can connect over USB, but the scanner is on the other side of the room and that defeats the purpose of the WiFi.

I have installed Epson's iscan, iscan-data and iscan-network-nt packages -- the latter being the one supposed to allow Epkowa devices connect over the network. Yes, I modified the epkowa.conf file in /etc/sane.d/ using both IP address and DNS name, but to no avail.

The printer works, the scanning port (1865) is active, but no joy on using simplescan, xsane, or iscan. Drat!

User Journal

Journal Journal: Ubuntu 15.10 and Epson / Seiko Printer Driver

Ubuntu 15.10 automatically found my Epson XP-610 wireless printer / scanner and tried to install the proper printer driver, but failed miserably.

By "miserably" I mean it got stuck halfway through installing the package file and gummed up their software installation utility. I had to "kill -9" the appropriate, defunct dpkg instance. A reboot will do it as well.

The problem seems to be the proprietary Epson driver relies on LSB (Linux Standard Base), which is no longer installed by default in Ubuntu. The fix is to download the appropriate .deb package from the Epson site. Install the driver with sudo dpkg -i epson-inkjet-printer-201308w_1.0.0-1lsb3.2_amd64.deb, which will install but not configure because of missing LSB as a dependency. Finally, do a sudo apt-get install -f to handle the missing dependencies and you can go into the Printers app and add the printer, as the drivers will now be available.

User Journal

Journal Journal: Brother P-Touch QL-500 on Linux 1

Just a quick entry because I couldn't find a fix for this issue anywhere online.

Under Linux, using Ubuntu 15.04 and 15.10, my USB-connected Brother QL-500 label printer is detected automatically and available out-of-the-box, no driver install necessary. Very nice.

I tried printing under Glabels and all I got was a flashing LED on the printer. The Brother website has a similar error under Windows, claiming this is caused by a mismatch between the label actually loaded in the printer and the setting in the driver. This was not the issue. I have DK-1201 address labels loaded, and the driver is set to 29 x 90 mm, which is also the template I'm using in Glabels.

In the driver (Printers app, Properties, Printer Options), there is a button labeled "Label Preamble". This is on by default and is the culprit. Un-check that box and the printer should now print properly.

User Journal

Journal Journal: CuBox Wifi Streaming Solved

I believe I have mentioned before that every bit of media I purchase I digitize and store the files on a central server. That includes over 300 movies and over 100 television episodes, plush a few hundred audio tracks. Everything is available anywhere in my home via wireless streaming, however I had been having problems with reliably streaming 1080p HD video over WiFi to my main television units.

My back end device is simply a Buffalo AirStation AC 1750 running DD-WRT build 27456. It is configured for WiFi AC-only in the 5.8 GHz band, and G/N/AC in the 2.4 GHz band to accommodate some older devices.

A Western Digital My Passport Ultra 2 Tb USB 3.0 drive is plugged into the back of the wireless router, which acts as a NAS and makes media available via SAMBA shares.

Over all I like this set-up, though after several months of use I can't really recommend the Buffalo AirStation for the simple reason that it doesn't have any external antennas. It really suffers in coverage area because of this. DD-WRT is great, as is the little 2 Tb WD drive, but I'll never again get a wireless gizmo that doesn't use an external antenna.

The front end to my televisions scattered throughout the house is a CuBox i4-Pro running OpenELEC. This is a fantastic combination that has been almost -- but not quite -- perfect for me. It is also easy to use for my non-technical wife and future geek 7-year old child.

The one issue has been reliably streaming 1080p HD videos to a CuBox. Even with the unit less than 10 meters away from the access point, with no obstructions, it would routinely have such a poor connection as to not be able to keep up with the playback. Watching the dashboard of DD-WRT showed me it had less than 30% signal strength and constantly would drop to 5.5 Mbps connection rates.

To eliminate interference I got up in the middle of the night and shut off everything that used wifi except the CuBox and it still performed poorly.

The short answer is the built-in wireless on the CuBox is abysmal. Again, no external antenna and 2.4 GHz only. Further investigation showed it would not work with channel bonding, thus not use 40 MHz channels in 802.11n. I don't know if it is a chipset limitation or a driver issue. Either way, it sucks.

My answer was to buy a USB wifi adapter with an external antenna. This one is tiny, totally plug-and-play, and absolutely does the trick. And for $12.99, including Prime shipping, a bargain. It is marketed towards the Raspberry Pi, which is what I bought it for. It uses the Realtek RT5370 chipset and is supported at the kernel level (no extra drivers needed) in Android, OpenELEC, Raspbian and lots of other Linux flavors.

It support 802.11n and bonded, 40 MHz channels and, more importantly, handles HD streams without breaking a sweat. I just ordered 2 more to outfit my 2 other CuBox devices so I can stream everything to the TVs in bedrooms without running wires.

(Note: I'm in a fairly low-population subdivision and not a lot of 2.4 GHz wireless around. I'm not stepping on any of my neighbors with my signal.)

User Journal

Journal Journal: Magnetic Cell Phone Docks 6

Just a short note. I picked up an Air Dock back when their Indigogo campaign was under way. I have now had this thing for a little over a year.

In general it works fine and does exactly what it says. I use the CD-mount, which has a nice picture down on this page.

The one flaw with that mount is the bolt and nut used to tighten it are fairly large, and extend beneath the mount. On DIN I sized radios, with the CD slot on top of the unit, the nut blocks the view of the display.

The one other thing I have discovered is that after a year of use, it has magnetized my phone! The Nexus 5 comes with small metal plates built in to the back to allow for the native use of devices like this. After all this time they have become magnetized, and that totally screws up the internal compass.

Now any time I start the compass app it complains the magnetic field strength is way too strong and it doesn't give accurate readings.

To be clear, this happens when the device is undocked and I'm walking around.

My next dock will be non-magnetic, as I do sometimes use the compass.

User Journal

Journal Journal: I'd forgot they made those things. 1

I dreamed I bought a REALLY big computer monitor, but I didn't notice the brand until I opened the box and saw "Arrivals" printed on the bezel.

User Journal

Journal Journal: The Trolls 81

Wow, it's been 15 years but I've finally got my own personal troll! :-)

I must apologize to everyone I've ever called a troll now that I've seen a real one. Yeah, there are trollish comments, but this... it's a different league. If you ever wondered who these brain-damaged morons were who set up geocities homepages with blinking purple text on blue background with red dots in Comic Sans - that kind of different league.

Now it does make me wonder about trolls in general. Has there been a study on this? I really wonder if psychologists have tackled this because quite honestly, you cannot be mentally stable and post in this and this content at the same time. So I do wonder if trolls on the Internet (the real trolls, not the people occasionally posting something stupid) do have a mental problem. It definitely looks like it. Probably insecurity issues, definitely an exaggerated need for attention, might be related to borderline syndrome or schizoprenia.

And, of course, the Internet provides:

As someone who has had to deal with family members suffering from mental illness, let me tell you that it's not funny. So despite the fact that they are, in fact, obnoxious, aggravating assholes, these sad little fucks also need help and their miserable little existence is not something you'd want to trade for yours, no matter how much you think your life sucks. Trust me, with a mental illness on top, it'll suck more.

Obviously, we can't offer therapy to people who usually comment anonymously and will often go to great lengths to avoid being tracked down. What we can do, however, is get a better understanding for how they act this way (they can't help it, mental illness is stronger than your conscious mind) and that the best thing we can do for them is to not continue the feedback loop. "Don't feed the trolls" - old wisdom there.

The last link in that list contains a few more ideas.

Now that I'm at the end, I kind of regret the smiley face at the top. But I'm leaving it in because this journal entry is a bit of a journey, even if it is short. Thanks to some Internet resources, a bit of research and connecting the dots, I've come a short way, changing my mind a little on this particular sub-sub-sub-part of life.

-----

A short additional statement on how to treat trolling. From what I've gathered from the resources above, a few comments (both here and in the various spammed threads) and my own life experience:

First, don't feed the trolls. Most of them seek attention, so if you stop giving it to them, they become frustrated and go away. Notice that they seek attention, not validation. A rebuke or an angry rant or even a shootout of personal insults satisfies them as much as anything else. Much like the old PR saying "there is no negative publicity", it is all about the attention itself, not about its content.

Second, stand your ground. Do not leave the site or stop commenting just because you're being trolled. It takes a bit to do that, yes. Trolls consider it a "victory" if they shut you up, either by simple flooding or by frustrating you enough to disappear. In their twisted minds, it gives them validation and somehow proves that they were right.

Third, if you see someone else being trolled, give them support. Doesn't take much - a single sentence is more than enough. Someone under attack by a real troll is being flooded. The troll will commonly post under multiple aliases or otherwise attempt to appear as more than one person. Psychological experiments such as Solomon Asch's show how we humans as social animals experience conformance pressure. So give that other person support by showing him that the flood he's getting is no the only opinion around. It doesn't matter if he consciously knows it's just one troll, the pressure is subconscious.

-----

I'd like to have comments disabled on this journal entry, for obvious reasons, but you can't publish a journal entry with comments disabled, so... 1000:1 bet that he's stalking the journal as well and will add his drivel below?

Also, if the formatting looks atrocious, turn off beta and revert to classic. Seriously.

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