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Submission + - Google Bringing Android to Your Car (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: Android: It’s not just for mobile devices anymore. Google has announced an Open Automotive Alliance (OAA) that will attempt to “optimize” Android for in-vehicle use. Participating automobile manufacturers include Audi, GM, Hyundai and Honda; Nvidia is also a partner. “Wouldn’t it be great if you could bring your favorite apps and music with you, and use them safely with your car’s built-in controls and in-dash display?” read a Jan. 6 note on Google’s Official Android Blog. “Together with our OAA partners, we’re working to enable new forms of integration with Android devices, and adapting Android for the car to make driving safer, easier and more enjoyable for everyone.” Putting Android into vehicles will “create new opportunities for developers to extend the variety and depth of the Android app ecosystem in new, exciting and safe ways,” the posting added. “But this is just the beginning; we welcome other automotive and technology companies to join the OAA, to work together to build a common platform to drive innovation in the car and bring Android to the open road.” The alliance is still very much in its early stages, with the first Android-integrated cars expected to hit the road by the end of 2014. Alliance members have reached out to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in order to make the platform as safe as possible. (No word on whether Google will attempt to integrate Android with its self-driving cars.) Google isn’t the only tech company positioning its mobile OS as ideal for cars: over the past several months, Apple has reached agreements with a number of automobile companies (including Honda and Hyundai) to integrate Siri Eyes Free into the driving experience. Siri Hands Free allows drivers to dictate texts and emails, listen to incoming texts and emails, set up calendar entries and alarms, check the weather, navigate, and receive sports scores and stock quotes.
Science

Submission + - Tiny Zaps Boost Memory (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Ever feel like you could use a little jolt to perk up your brain? Six epilepsy patients recently got exactly that. While they were in the hospital awaiting surgery to mitigate their seizures, they volunteered for an unusual experiment: Taking advantage of platinum electrodes surgeons had implanted in the patients' brains, researchers zapped the volunteers with mild pulses of electrical current. The jolts enhanced the patients' ability to learn their way around a virtual city.
China

Submission + - Is China a Cyber Paper Tiger? (the-diplomat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Despite the hype in the Western media, two new surveys suggest that China isn't as big a cyber threat as many believe. ecent writings in the Chinese press have more of a “China is vulnerable” flavor and suggest that analysts, if not characterizing the country’s cyber strategy as weak, think there’s a great deal of work that remains to be done.
Networking

Submission + - The Importance of Networks in Daily Life (net-security.org)

Orome1 writes: "Demonstrating the increasing role of the network in people's lives, an international workforce study by Cisco revealed that one in three college students and young professionals considers the Internet to be as important as fundamental human resources like air, water, food and shelter. The Cisco report also found that more than half of the study's respondents say they could not live without the Internet and cite it as an "integral part of their lives" – in some cases more integral than cars, dating, and partying. These and numerous other findings provide insight into the mindset, expectations, and behavior of the world's next generation of workers and how they will influence everything from business communications and mobile lifestyles to hiring, corporate security, and companies' abilities to compete."
Network

Submission + - Longest connection 100Gbps infrastructure (google.nl)

Device666 writes: The educational ICT provider SURFnet and the Geneva-based CERN research organization started in July with a test phase, after the line in recent weeks by gaining access to the AMS-IX was put into use. Meanwhile, the 100 GbE line, which spans a distance of 1650 kilometers, with a success rate of 100Gbps has been achieved.

It's the longest 100Gbps connection in the world, says AMS-IX Internet Exchange. Although the organization is not indicating what the connection might be used for, it can be used in the analysis of data from the LHC particle accelerator, which lies north of Geneva. The particle accelerator that generates a total of 15 petabytes of data, and some is analyzed in the Netherlands as Nikhef investigates proton-proton collisions.

Security

Submission + - Aaron Swartz Charged With Hacking MIT Network (threatpost.com)

Trailrunner7 writes: A 24 year-old entrepreneur and star programmer has been indicted by the federal authorities in Boston following and accused of hacking into the network of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and making off with millions of pages of copyrighted documents.

Aaron Swartz, who is best known as an early collaborator on the news site Reddit.com, turned himself in and was arraigned in U.S. District Court in Boston on Tuesday morning. He was charged with wire fraud, computer fraud,unlawfully obtaining information from a protected computer, and recklessly damaging a protected computer, according to a statement released by Carmen Ortiz, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts.

According to the U.S. Attorney, Swartz, who was let go from Reddit in 2007, allegedly broke into a wiring closet in a basement at MIT and used a switch within that closet to get unauthorized access to MIT's network. He then allegedly used that access to copy four million articles from JSTOR, an online document archiving service for academic journals.

Android

Submission + - Apple lawsuits slammed by Google (cnet.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Google chairman Eric Schmidt has slammed Apple's lawsuit against HTC. Apple (and others) "are not responding with innovation, they're responding with lawsuits" he said at the Google Mobile Revolution conference in Tokyo.

Submission + - Data-Mining Ban Struck Down by US Supreme Court (medpagetoday.com) 1

smitty777 writes: The Supreme Court struck down Sorrell vs IMS Health, a law banning data mining which has been in place since 2007. The court ruled that the data on medications prescribed by doctors is protected by the First Amendment and can be used for marketing by the pharmaceutical companies. This follows similar declarations in Maine and New Hamshire.
Games

Submission + - Leaked file shows EVE Online microtransaction plan (joystiq.com)

An anonymous reader writes: In the wake of controversy surrounding EVE Online's new microtransaction store and its not-so-micro prices, a document has surfaced that has raised more than a few eyebrows in the EVE community. The PDF is reported to be a copy of CCP's internal company newsletter Fearless. Ex-CCP employee and current CSM member Seleene was able to verify that the company does circulate an internal newsletter by that name and that the style is very similar to the leaked document.
Technology

Submission + - Of Codebreakers and Mechanical Giants (theepochtimes.com)

jjp9999 writes: "A war of spies and electromechanical machines that took place beneath the wires during World War II not only played a crucial role in the Allies victory, but also helped spark the beginning of the computer age. Among the devices was the Enigma, a cipher capable of producing 150,000,000,000,000,000,000 possible code combinations, and a hulking machine, the Colossus, the first programmable electronic computer, capable of decoding the Enigma."
Security

Submission + - EMC's Anti-Hacking Division Gets Hacked (yahoo.com)

Nominei writes: "The world's biggest maker of data storage computers on Thursday said that its security division has been hacked, and that the intruders compromised a widely used technology for preventing computer break-ins. It is especially troubling because the technology sold by EMC's security division, RSA, plays an important role in making sure unauthorized people aren't allowed to log into heavily guarded networks.

The scope of the attack wasn't immediately known, but the potential fallout could be widespread. RSA's customers include the military, governments, various banks and medical facilities and health insurance outfits."

Science

Submission + - David Rumelhart, neural network pioneer dies (stanford.edu) 1

Dr_Ish writes: "David Rumelhart, one of the main movers and shakes behind the resurgence of artificial neural network research in the mid-80s has died. There is a brief obituary available at http://news.stanford.edu/news/2011/march/david-rumelhart-obit-031711.html. Rumelhart was one of the seminal figures in cognitive science research during the 1980s. His work is still widely cited. He is also the inspiration behind the Rumelhart prize, one of the major awards in the computer science of intelligence. Although in recent years a medical condition had prevented him being an active research contributer, he will still be sorely missed."
Media

Submission + - Digital Media Libraries 1

An anonymous reader writes: Like many slashdotters, I have several TB of digital media: music, books, movies, tv shows, games, comics, you name it. I've put it all in a few HDs, but handling it all has proven to be less than optimal.
I'm covered when it comes to music, since [pretty much any music player/library manager] allows me to quickly find songs by interpreter, album, genre... For everything else, all I have is a series of hierarchical folder structures, but hierarchies have limitations. I can find Blade Runner easily, but what if I wanted all of Scott Ridley's films? Where is "Good Omens", in the Terry Pratchett folder or in Neil Gaiman's? Furthermore, in a collection with hundreds of similar items, it would help to have some extra clues such as covers (for comic books) or synopsis for TV shows' episodes.
Do you have any software to help you handle digital media libraries? Specialized software (say, something that only work for comics, something else for movies), or generic media libraries? Opensource alternatives are preferred, but commercial software is fine as well.

Submission + - Dutch Court Rules WiFi Hacking Is Now Legal (pcworld.com)

loekessers writes: "Breaking in to an encrypted router and using the WiFi connection is not an criminal offence, a Dutch court ruled. WiFi hackers can not be prosecuted for breaching router security.

The Judge reasoned that the student didn't gain access to the computer connected to the router, but only used the routers internet connection. Under Dutch law breaking in to a computer is forbidden.

A computer in The Netherlands is defined as a machine that is used for three things: the storage, processing and transmission of data. A router can therefore not be described as a computer because it is only used to transfer or process data and not for storing bits and bytes. Hacking a device that is no computer by law is not illegal, and can not be prosecuted, the court concluded.

Original source http://webwereld.nl/nieuws/106024/rechter--wifi-netwerk-van-de-buren-hacken-mag.html"

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