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Submission + - Slashdot Media sold to BIZX, LCC

An anonymous reader writes: DHI (formerly Dice Holdings) has finalized the sale of Slashdot Media (consisting of Slashdot and SoureForge) to BIZX, LLC on January 27th, 2016, according to a press release on Thursday morning. No financial details were given in the press release, nor any details about how Slashdot or SourceForge will be handled by their new owners.

Submission + - The Amazon Fire Is the Dirtiest Smartphone

Jason Koebler writes: The biggest thing that sets the Amazon Fire Phone apart from its Android and Apple competitors probably isn't the clean interface or the unlimited photo storage—it's the dirty power behind it. When Fire users upload their photos and data to Amazon's cloud, they'll be creating a lot more pollution than iPhone owners, Greenpeace says.
Apple has made a commitment to running its iCloud on 100 percent clean energy. Amazon, meanwhile, operates the dirtiest servers of any major tech giant that operates its own servers—only 15 percent of its energy comes from clean sources, which is about the default national average.
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Submission + - The Long Arm of the Tweet (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "According to a recent Lexis-Nexis survey of 1200 law enforcement personnel, 80% use social media to conduct investigations. And it's easy to see why: While it helps that you share 'enormously detailed information' online, it's your social network that really does the talking, says Lee Altschuler, a Federal defense attorney. 'Cops will figure out who the associates of the suspect are,' Altschuler explained. 'The police will then friend or connect to the associates, working to gain their trust, and then will eventually friend the target directly, or be able to glean information about the target through the associates.' Of course, this is pretty much the same action they've always taken in the offline world, it's just far more efficient on social media (plus, there's the aforementioned willingness to share information online)."

Submission + - ISPs Throttling BitTorrent Traffic, Study Finds (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: A new report by an open source internet measurement platform, Measurement Lab, sheds light onto throttling of and restriction on BitTorrent traffic by ISPs (Internet Service Provider) across the globe. The report by Measurement Lab reveals that hundreds of ISPs across the globe are involved into throttling of peer-to-peer traffic through and specifically BitTorrent traffic. The Glasnost application run by the platform helps in detecting whether ISPs shape traffic and tests can be carried out to check whether the throttling or blocking is carried out “on email, HTTP or SSH transfer, Flash video, and P2P apps including BitTorrent, eMule and Gnutella”. Going by country, United States has actually seen a drop in throttling compared to what it was back in 2010. Throttling in US is worst for Cox at 6 per cent and best for Comcast, Verizon, AT&T and others at around 3 per cent. United Kingdom is seeing a rise in traffic shaping and BT is the worst with 65 per cent. Virgin Media throttles around 22 per cent of the traffic while the least is O2 at 2 per cent. More figures can be found here.

Comment Re:Solution (Score 1) 664

I agree this isn't censorship, however I CAN see hypothetical situations not too far from our own reality that should be considered.

If the iPhone was so ubiquitous that there simply wasn't competition, that smartphones were necessary for success and they started pushing out old media, then I think it is fair to argue that it may be censorship. We all know the general consumer is too brain dead to really care about censorship and wouldn't demand a change loudly enough that it would change Apple's behavior. So yeah, I think its good to be on guard to prevent such scenarios, so don't get too angry at the people who shout "censorship!" at every possible instance. Their sensors are just calibrated too sensitively.

Comment Why would you need an app to view a cartoon? (Score 0) 664

You get what you pay for - pay your money take your choice.

Can't help thinking the Apple defamation/libel yes men had more to do with this than 'censorship' - Apple covering their ass. They not forcing you to use this app to view this cartoon [yet?]

So this iApp downloads a file from a server and displays it - something like a http client.

Shiny Shiny.......

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