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Mozilla

Submission + - Multi-processor support coming for Firefox (mozillalinks.org)

suraj.sun writes: Mozilla has started a new project to make Firefox split in several processes at a time: one running the main user interface (chrome), and another or several others running the web content in each tab. Like Chrome or Internet Explorer 8 which have implemented this behavior to some degree, the main benefit would be the increase of stability: a single tab crash would not take down the whole session with it, as well as performance improvements in multiprocessor systems that are progressively becoming the norm.

The project, which lacks a catchy name like other Mozilla projects (like TaskFox, Ubiquity, or Chocolate Factory) is coordinated by long time Mozillian, Benjamin Smedberg; and also integrated by Joe Drew, Jason Duell, Ben Turner, and Boris Zbarsky in the core team.

According to the loose roadmap published, a simple implementation that works with a single tab (not sessions support, no secure connections, either on Linux or Windows, probably not even based on Firefox) should be reached around mid-July. Phase II will deal with the interactions between the two process types (chrome and content), and is aimed for November. So it seems we won't see a multiprocess Firefox for at least a year or so. However, some decisions like taking Chromium's networking stack to replace Necko, could accelerate the process.

So it seems we won't see a multiprocess Firefox for at least a year or so. However, some decisions like taking Chromium's networking stack to replace Necko, could accelerate the process.

Mozilla Links : http://mozillalinks.org/wp/2009/05/multi-processor-support-coming-for-firefox/

Biotech

Hadrosaur Proteins Sequenced 81

jd writes "In a follow-up study to the one on proteins found in a T. Rex bone, the team responsible for the T. Rex study sequenced proteins found in an 80-million year old Hadrosaur fossil. According to the article, the proteins found confirm the results of the T. Rex study, proving that what was found in T. Rex was not a result of modern contamination, as had been claimed by skeptics, but was indeed the genuine thing: real dinosaur protein. Furthermore, despite the new fossil being 12 million years older, they claim they got more out — eight collagen peptides and 149 amino acids from four different samples. This, they say, places the Hadrosaur in the same family as T. Rex and Ostriches, but that not enough was recovered to say just how close or distant the relationship was."

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