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Comment Re:I am amazed that there is no current limiter (Score 2) 149

'I'd argue that the device would be far more destructive if it pumped -12v instead of -240v since it would be able to output a lot more current.'

IANAEE, but as I understand it: high current can cause heat damage and possibly fires, but high voltage can jump lines and cause failure in more than just the circuit it was introduced to.

Both are potentially (no pun intended) very bad. But a high voltage spike will cause much more widespread damage in a very short span. This is why we treat static electricity (high voltage, low current) with such respect around electronics.

Comment Re: Sorry - whose car is this? (Score 1) 305

This is not technically true. The same protection is offered to all products in all industries via the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act. The difference here is that some vehicle companies tried to do an end run around it and were slammed by the FTC for doing so.

I wonder if Tesla will try to claim that they do the maintenance for free and are therefore exempt. But I think (and hope) there will be a quick and considerable backlash against them, both from consumers and the courts.

Comment Re:Before copyright, no credit and no money (Score 1) 219

The idea is that a limited monopoly for copying enables the artist to derive some (non-joyous) benefit from their endeavour, thus allowing them to create more art, since they're not busy using all their time working on something else simply so they can eat.

Joy is a wonderful byproduct of being an artist, but it doesn't feed anyone.

Comment Re:Drake Equation == 1 (Score 1) 258

Alternatively, (as far as I understand it) if you can figure out how to bypass inertia, you don't need acceleration. If we can find a way to manipulate our inertial reference frame directly, we can skip the whole 'acceleration' business altogether and change velocities instantaneously.

Interestingly, this ability would also enable us to ignore gravity completely. So I think we should get started on it immediately.

Comment Re: Microsoft... (Score 1) 292

This is my single biggest complaint about the iPhone - there is NO option to prevent a device from requesting play to start. I rented a Camry recently (though I've had the exact same issue with Ford/Lincoln, GM, and other brands) and had to add an Activator trigger upon bluetooth connection to enable StopPlayin', wait 15 seconds, and disable it so it wouldn't blow my ears out and scare the shite out of me when I started the car.

Of course, I'd also like to draw and quarter the langering fuckwanks who decided that the appropriate behaviour when an audio source is disconnected is to IMMEDIATELY START BLASTING THE RADIO AT THE SAME VOLUME AS THE LAST SOURCE with no option to disable it.

Comment Re:Doll. Fin. (Score 2) 305

Learning the American style of trying to stuff all punctuation inside quotes always seemed like a sort of madness to me.

Here is an interesting read that might broaden your stylo-linguistic horizons.

There are so many instances when placing punctuation outside the quotation punctuation makes infinitely more sense, 'style guides' be damned.

Comment Re:one better... (Score 1) 48

I'm surprised no one has mentioned the Mophie Space case yet... battery and storage for iPhones in one.

Unfortunately, the Mophie app (which is required for file management, same as the SanDisk) is a broken piece of absolute shit. My mophie has 64GB of storage, but will only manage 10k photos. (I have over 13k on my phone.) But it runs poorly even in the best of conditions.

I am horribly disappointed that SanDisk is only making this for the 6 series phones. It could have been a contender...

Comment Re: Not secure? (Score 1) 82

Well-put. Perhaps the caveat should be the number of contributors, rather than simple popularity. (Though I do imagine those numbers are somewhat correlated in open-source projects.)

Some software faults are tremendously obscure. In fact, there are many that exist that will *never* be discovered. It's just a fact of life.

But I think we agree that open-source software has the inherent potential to be more secure by its nature than its closed-source counterparts.

Comment Re:First world problem (Score 1) 771

You are absolutely correct - the iPhone is a first-world device, no question.

The problem is that Apple is a trend-setter and leader in the mobile space. Other companies and manufacturers will follow suit and make it more difficult for those who need inexpensive options. At the very least, they will fracture the market, and at worst, significantly degrade the experience of those who have no say in the matter.

Only MHO.

Comment Re:First world problem (Score 2, Insightful) 771

Actually, this is anything but a first world problem.

Many third-world countries bypassed POTS infrastructure because it was too expensive, but have adopted mobile technology instead. The mobile phones in those countries are their lifelines. Removing inexpensive, ubiquitous technology that isn't broken for no reason except to pad their already unobtanium-lined pockets is ultimately a purely greed-motivated move in Apple's part that will end up harming those third-world people. (A $30 dongle costs the average person two weeks' gross pay in Chad.)

The first world can suck up the cost. But could end up truly being a problem for the third-world.

Comment Re: Not secure? (Score 1) 82

It isn't the openness of code that makes bugs shallow. In fact, as I remember the original quote, it went something like: 'given enough eyes, all bugs are shallow'.

It has nothing to do with the state of the code and everything to do with how many people are analysing the code.

With open source, the opportunity exists for many more people to examine the code and discover the faults, and that increases hugely with the popularity of the software and its development. With closed-source development, only the people authorised to see the code will examine it.

So the number of lines of code (x) divided by the number of developers looking at it (y) gives the real "shallowness" value. As x:y decreases, more faults tend to be discovered in a given time period. (This does not account for the complexity of the faults, obviously.)

A popular open-source project will be much more likely to have a lower x:y ratio than a comparable closed-source project, even if for no other reason than it is in the company's best interest to increase x:y for profit.

What's more, not only are faults found more easily with more eyes, but the fixes for those faults are also more easily written and applied with more minds working on it.

I hope this helps explain the 'REALITY' you speak of a bit better to you. There is real security value in open-source software.

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