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Submission + - New browser fingerprinting site launched

AnonymousCube writes: The University of Adelaide and ACEMS has launched a new browser fingerprinting test suite.
On the site you can see what data can be used to track you and how unique your fingerprint is.
The site includes new tests such as detecting software such as Privacy Badger via how social media buttons are disabled and CSS only (no JavaScript or flash) tests to get screen size and installed fonts.

Submission + - Solar Cells Converting Co2 Into Hydrocarbon Fuel Discovered. (nextbigfuture.com)

William Robinson writes: Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have engineered a potentially game-changing solar cell that cheaply and efficiently converts atmospheric carbon dioxide directly into usable hydrocarbon fuel, using only sunlight for energy. This artificial leaf delivers syngas, or synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide. Syngas can be burned directly, or converted into diesel or other hydrocarbon fuels. The discovery opens up possibilities of clean reusable energy.

Submission + - Martian gullies not formed by water flow

An anonymous reader writes: Spectroscopy of many of the gullies on Mars strongly suggests that water had nothing to do with their formation, even though these gullies resemble closely similar gullies on Earth that were carved by flowing water..

Color coding in light blue corresponds to surface composition of unaltered mafic material, of volcanic origin. Mafic material from the crater rim is carved and transported downslope along the gully channels. No hydrated minerals are observed within the gullies, in the data from CRISM, indicating limited interaction or no interaction of the mafic material with liquid water. These findings and related observations at about 100 other gully sites on Mars suggest that a mechanism not requiring liquid water may be responsible for carving these gullies on Mars. (Gullies on Mars are a different type of feature than seasonal dark streaks called recurring slope lineae or RSL; water in the form of hydrated salt has been identified at RSL sites.) [emphasis mine]

In other words, these gullies were formed by flowing lava, not water. Considering Mars’s lower gravity, one third that of Earth’s, we should not be surprised if lava is capable of doing things there that it is not generally capable of doing on Earth. In fact, we should remind ourselves constantly that Mars is an alien planet, and that conditions there are different enough to make any predictions based on our knowledge of Earth very unreliable.

Submission + - Hackers successfully cyber-attacked Vietnam's two largest airports and airline (washingtontimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The attacks — attributed to a Chinese hacking group known as 1937CN — ultimately failed to cause any significant security issues or air traffic control problems, Vice Minister of Transport Nguyen Nhat told local media.
Nonetheless, the individuals briefly hijacked flight information screens and sound systems inside Noi Bai and Tan Son Nhat airports in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, respectively.
“All internet systems have been switched off so we had to do everything by hand,” an airline attendant at Tan Son Nhat told Vietnam’s Tuou Tre News.
At a third hub, Da Nang International, computer systems experienced repeated glitches, according to the news site. Instead of departure and arrival details, the airports’ flight screens and speakers broadcast what local media described as anti-Vietnamese and Philippines slogans, in turn prompting authorities to shut down both systems.

Submission + - .onion Debian services now available

alfino writes: Long-time Debian System Administrator Peter "weasel" Palfrader announced today that a number of Debian services / web sites are now also available via Tor .onion domains.

Yay for privacy. We don't care about where you come from, and now you don't even have to tell anyone that you're using Debian.

The archive at ftp.debian.org is already in the list. Support for more redundant Debian archive access is expected to come When It's Ready.

Comment Google, Twitter, Quora et al do this every day (Score 1) 40

There is nothing shocking in the article and the evidence presented actual proves very little, other than they are using analytics's just like every body else using the web. Why is this shocking when spooks do this but not when Google, Twitter and other do this all the time?

Hell I've done it on occasions to track how many people have downloaded things I've published in different places.

Comment Following Disney's lead (Score 1) 216

Disney have been doing this for years with public domain and other content and getting away with it using their army of lawyers crush their opponents. Their stolen works, which will get them suing you including Rudyard Kipling, Robert Louis Stephenson, Winnie the Poo and even European fairy tales that are hundred of years old.

Submission + - SPAM: ReBooting the WWW

Martin S. writes: The Decentralized Web Summit took place at the Internet Archive between June 7th and June 9th, 2016. Videos from the event which included speakers Tim Berners-Lee, Christopher Allen, Vint Cerf amongst many others are now available and more are expected soon.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - SPAM: UK judge calls for an "online court" without lawyers

mi writes: A senior judge has called for the establishment of an online court that does not have lawyers and can deal with claims of up to £25,000.

The proposal is the centrepiece of a package of reforms to the civil justice system, drawn up by Lord Justice Briggs, a Court of Appeal judge.

Just how exactly will this court ensure no one is, in fact, a trained professional on the Internet, where no one knows, who you really are, is not explained.

We discussed the idea last year. Apparently, it is still alive.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Getty Sued For $1 Billion For Selling Publicly Donated Photos

An anonymous reader writes: Online stock media library Getty Images is facing a $1 billion lawsuit from an American photographer for illegally selling copyright for thousands of photos. The Seattle-based company has been sued by documentary photographer Carol Highsmith for ‘gross misuse’, after it sold more than 18,000 of her photos despite having already donated them for public use. Highsmith’s photos which were sold via Getty Images had been available for free via the Library of Congress. Getty has now been accused of selling unauthorised licenses of the images, not crediting the author, and for also sending threatening warnings and fines to those who had used the pictures without paying for the falsely imposed copyright.

Submission + - Pokemon Go Doubles Nintendo's Stock Price (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Shares of Japan's Nintendo Co soared another 14 percent on Tuesday, more than doubling the firm's market capitalization to 4.5 trillion yen ($42.5 billion) in just seven sessions since the mobile game Pokemon GO was launched in the United States. The phenomenal success of Pokemon GO — now available in 35 countries, the majority in Europe, and most recently in Canada — has triggered massive buying in Nintendo shares, surprising even some seasoned market players. Nintendo shares ended Tuesday up 14.4 percent at 31,770 yen, bringing its gains to more than 100 percent since the launch of the game on July 6. Turnover in Nintendo shares hit 703.6 billion yen, surpassing the record for trading turnover in individual shares it set on Friday, of 476 billion yen. Trading in Nintendo shares roughly accounted for a quarter of the entire trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange's main board. The success of Pokemon GO, unforeseen even by its creators, has boosted hopes that Nintendo could capitalize on a line-up of popular characters ranging from Zelda to Super Mario to strengthen its new foray into augmented reality.

Submission + - Resolving IP address ranges conflicts in a corporate merger

SwingMonkey writes: Hoping the Slashdot audience may be able to offer some insight on this topic.

Caveat: I'm not a Network Engineer per se, but have spent some time playing in the networking space.

Currently I'm involved in a corporate merger. Both entities use extensive private IP address spaces internally, in the A, B and C class ranges, and the consolidated IP Routing table on each side runs into the thousands (expressed as a list of CIDRs) including inherited/aggregated collections of networks i.e. a /8 is further broken into a set of /16 which might be further divided into /23's or /24's. Inevitably there are entire network ranges that are in use on both sides, or overlap to some degree.

I've encountered this before, but never to this degree. Previously it has generally been a mostly manual effort to resolve the conflicts, but the size of the data sets in this case are somewhat daunting.

I've been looking for a data analysis tool, or visualization approach that would simply reviewing the data set, and develop a model of the conflicted spaces, but haven't been able to find much — hence turning to this forum (in desperation ;)

Thoughts?

Submission + - UK 'emergency' bulk data slurp permissible in pursuit of 'serious crime' (theregister.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Bulk collection of data from phone calls and emails by carriers acting under government orders could be permissible in the pursuit of “serious crime”.

That’s the preliminary ruling in a case brought by Brexit chief minister David Davis against PM Theresa May before the European Union’s highest court.

The ruling suggests bulk collection and retention of customer data might not be in breach of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights — if it’s done legally and with safeguards.

Davis with Labour Party deputy leader Tom Watson and others brought their case to the European Court of Justice in February.

Submission + - A Debate Over the Physics of Time (quantamagazine.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Einstein once described his friend Michele Besso as “the best sounding board in Europe” for scientific ideas. They attended university together in Zurich; later they were colleagues at the patent office in Bern. When Besso died in the spring of 1955, Einstein — knowing that his own time was also running out — wrote a now-famous letter to Besso’s family. “Now he has departed this strange world a little ahead of me,” Einstein wrote of his friend’s passing. “That signifies nothing. For us believing physicists, the distinction between past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”

Einstein’s statement was not merely an attempt at consolation. Many physicists argue that Einstein’s position is implied by the two pillars of modern physics: Einstein’s masterpiece, the general theory of relativity, and the Standard Model of particle physics. The laws that underlie these theories are time-symmetric — that is, the physics they describe is the same, regardless of whether the variable called “time” increases or decreases. Moreover, they say nothing at all about the point we call “now” — a special moment (or so it appears) for us, but seemingly undefined when we talk about the universe at large. The resulting timeless cosmos is sometimes called a “block universe” — a static block of space-time in which any flow of time, or passage through it, must presumably be a mental construct or other illusion.

Submission + - Infants Have Gender Identity (sciencedaily.com)

Texmaize writes: It is in vogue today to pretend that gender is fluid and a mere social construct. Some parents even gleefully go out of their way to give their children toys that traditionally are for the other gender, in hopes of making them......better? A study published in Infant and development suggests that babies seem to know better than some confused adults.

"Children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to a new study. The research suggests the possibility that boys and girls follow different developmental trajectories with respect to selection of gender-typed toys and that there is both a biological and a developmental-environmental components to the sex differences seen in object preferences."

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