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Submission + - Pokemon Go Doubles Nintendo's Stock Price (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Shares of Japan's Nintendo Co soared another 14 percent on Tuesday, more than doubling the firm's market capitalization to 4.5 trillion yen ($42.5 billion) in just seven sessions since the mobile game Pokemon GO was launched in the United States. The phenomenal success of Pokemon GO — now available in 35 countries, the majority in Europe, and most recently in Canada — has triggered massive buying in Nintendo shares, surprising even some seasoned market players. Nintendo shares ended Tuesday up 14.4 percent at 31,770 yen, bringing its gains to more than 100 percent since the launch of the game on July 6. Turnover in Nintendo shares hit 703.6 billion yen, surpassing the record for trading turnover in individual shares it set on Friday, of 476 billion yen. Trading in Nintendo shares roughly accounted for a quarter of the entire trading on the Tokyo Stock Exchange's main board. The success of Pokemon GO, unforeseen even by its creators, has boosted hopes that Nintendo could capitalize on a line-up of popular characters ranging from Zelda to Super Mario to strengthen its new foray into augmented reality.

Submission + - Resolving IP address ranges conflicts in a corporate merger

SwingMonkey writes: Hoping the Slashdot audience may be able to offer some insight on this topic.

Caveat: I'm not a Network Engineer per se, but have spent some time playing in the networking space.

Currently I'm involved in a corporate merger. Both entities use extensive private IP address spaces internally, in the A, B and C class ranges, and the consolidated IP Routing table on each side runs into the thousands (expressed as a list of CIDRs) including inherited/aggregated collections of networks i.e. a /8 is further broken into a set of /16 which might be further divided into /23's or /24's. Inevitably there are entire network ranges that are in use on both sides, or overlap to some degree.

I've encountered this before, but never to this degree. Previously it has generally been a mostly manual effort to resolve the conflicts, but the size of the data sets in this case are somewhat daunting.

I've been looking for a data analysis tool, or visualization approach that would simply reviewing the data set, and develop a model of the conflicted spaces, but haven't been able to find much — hence turning to this forum (in desperation ;)

Thoughts?

Submission + - UK 'emergency' bulk data slurp permissible in pursuit of 'serious crime' (theregister.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: Bulk collection of data from phone calls and emails by carriers acting under government orders could be permissible in the pursuit of “serious crime”.

That’s the preliminary ruling in a case brought by Brexit chief minister David Davis against PM Theresa May before the European Union’s highest court.

The ruling suggests bulk collection and retention of customer data might not be in breach of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights — if it’s done legally and with safeguards.

Davis with Labour Party deputy leader Tom Watson and others brought their case to the European Court of Justice in February.

Submission + - A Debate Over the Physics of Time (quantamagazine.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Einstein once described his friend Michele Besso as “the best sounding board in Europe” for scientific ideas. They attended university together in Zurich; later they were colleagues at the patent office in Bern. When Besso died in the spring of 1955, Einstein — knowing that his own time was also running out — wrote a now-famous letter to Besso’s family. “Now he has departed this strange world a little ahead of me,” Einstein wrote of his friend’s passing. “That signifies nothing. For us believing physicists, the distinction between past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion.”

Einstein’s statement was not merely an attempt at consolation. Many physicists argue that Einstein’s position is implied by the two pillars of modern physics: Einstein’s masterpiece, the general theory of relativity, and the Standard Model of particle physics. The laws that underlie these theories are time-symmetric — that is, the physics they describe is the same, regardless of whether the variable called “time” increases or decreases. Moreover, they say nothing at all about the point we call “now” — a special moment (or so it appears) for us, but seemingly undefined when we talk about the universe at large. The resulting timeless cosmos is sometimes called a “block universe” — a static block of space-time in which any flow of time, or passage through it, must presumably be a mental construct or other illusion.

Submission + - Infants Have Gender Identity (sciencedaily.com)

Texmaize writes: It is in vogue today to pretend that gender is fluid and a mere social construct. Some parents even gleefully go out of their way to give their children toys that traditionally are for the other gender, in hopes of making them......better? A study published in Infant and development suggests that babies seem to know better than some confused adults.

"Children as young as 9 months-old prefer to play with toys specific to their own gender, according to a new study. The research suggests the possibility that boys and girls follow different developmental trajectories with respect to selection of gender-typed toys and that there is both a biological and a developmental-environmental components to the sex differences seen in object preferences."

Submission + - A Smaller Version of Raspberry Pi 3 Is Coming Soon (pcworld.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A smaller version of the popular Raspberry Pi 3 will go on sale in a few months. Raspberry Pi is developing a new version of its Compute Module, a single-board computer that plugs into specific on-board memory slots. The new Pi will be more like a mini-computer inside a computer, and it won't come with a power supply. The Compute Module will have similar circuitry to that of Raspberry Pi 3, a wildly successful computer that can be a PC replacement. But it will be smaller, with the memory, CPU, and storage embedded tightly on a board. While the Compute Module will have a 64-bit ARM processor like the Pi 3, it won't have Wi-Fi, Eben Upton, founder of Raspberry Pi, said in an interview with IDG News Service. The Compute Module could ship as soon as this quarter, Upton said. It will be priced similar to its predecessor, the 2-year-old Compute Module, available from reseller RS Components for about $24. The older Compute Module is based on the original Raspberry Pi. Like Raspberry Pi 3, the new Compute Module will work with Linux and Microsoft's Windows 10 IoT Core, Upton said. A Compute Module Development Kit, in which the Compute Module can be slotted for testing, may also be sold. The Development Kit could have multiple connectivity and port options, much like the Raspberry Pi 3.

Submission + - 60 people killed and many more injured in terrorist attack in Nice, France (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A truck slowly drove towards a crowd, accelerated and then hit people on the famous Promenade des Anglais shortly after celebratory fireworks had ended. July 14th is a national holiday in remembrance of the attack on the Bastille which started the French Revolution. The truck reportedly drove more than a mile before the driver was shot and the truck stopped.

Submission + - PM Theresa May drops political bombshell on Whitehall -- tech firms beware! (arstechnica.co.uk)

An anonymous reader writes: British Prime Minister Theresa May has given a stern warning to big business, telling the public to "think not of the powerful, but you." Specifically, she singled out Google and Amazon for dodging taxes and creating a lot of parliamentary scrutiny. Ars Technica reports: "May has been quick to stamp her brand of conservatism on her party by letting go of key members of Cameron's cabinet. She has so far sacked big hitters such as chancellor of the exchequer George Osborne, justice secretary Michael Gove, and culture secretary John Whittingdale. Philip Hammond now has the keys to Number 11, but we're still waiting to hear who will replace Whittingdale, whose remit included the rollout of super fast broadband in the UK. He's also the man behind the White Paper on the future of the BBC, which sought radical changes at the public service broadcaster. So far, 10 cabinet positions have been announced by May. They include Justine Greening as secretary of state for education, and Liz Truss becomes justice secretary, while former London mayor and key Brexit campaigner Boris Johnson — to the surprise of many — now heads up the foreign office. May has handed her home secretary job to Amber Rudd — who will now be responsible for the government's push for greater online surveillance laws. Rudd was previously the minister for energy and climate change."

Submission + - SPAM: Space reporter reveals how President Jimmy Carter saved the space shuttle

MarkWhittington writes: Eric Berger has published an account in Ars Technica about how President Jimmy Carter saved the space shuttle program. The article is well worth reading for its detail. In essence, around 1978 the space shuttle program had undergone a crisis with technical challenges surrounding its heat-resistant tiles and its reusable rocket engines and cost overruns. President Carter was not all that enthused about human space flight, to begin with, adhering to the since discredited notion that robotic space probes were adequate for exploring the universe. His vice president, Walter Mondale, was a vehement foe of human space flight programs, maintaining that money spent on them were better used for social programs.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - U.S. military veteran believed to be lone gunman in Da (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: DALLAS (Reuters) — A black U.S. military veteran of the Afghan war who said he wanted to "kill white people" acted alone in a sniper attack that killed five police officers during a Dallas protest decrying police shootings of black men, officials said on Friday.

Submission + - Bitcoin 'miners' face fight for survival as new supply halves (reuters.com)

SpzToid writes: On Saturday, the reward for miners will be slashed in half. Written into bitcoin's code when it was invented in 2008 was a rule dictating that the prize would be halved every four years, in a step designed to keep a lid on bitcoin inflation.

From around 1700 GMT on Saturday, instead of 25 bitcoins up for grabs globally every 10 minutes, worth around $16,000 at the current rate BTC=BTSP, there will be just 12.5.

That means only the mining companies with the leanest operations will survive the ensuing profit hit.

"The most important thing is to be the most efficient miner," said Streng, the 26-year-old co-founder of German firm Genesis Mining, which has "mining farms" in Canada, the United States and eastern Europe, as well as in Iceland. "When the others drop out, that means that they leave the market and give you a bigger share of the pie."

Submission + - Researchers Discover 100+ Tor Nodes Designed To Spy On Hidden Services (schneier.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two researchers have discovered over 100 Tor nodes that are spying on hidden services. Cory Doctorow from Boing Boing reports: "These nodes — ordinary nodes, not exit nodes — sorted through all the traffic that passed through them, looking for anything bound for a hidden service, which allowed them to discover hidden services that had not been advertised. These nodes then attacked the hidden services by making connections to them and trying common exploits against the server-software running on them, seeking to compromise and take them over. The researchers used 'honeypot' .onion servers to find the spying computers: these honeypots were .onion sites that the researchers set up in their own lab and then connected to repeatedly over the Tor network, thus seeding many Tor nodes with the information of the honions' existence. They didn't advertise the honions' existence in any other way and there was nothing of interest at these sites, and so when the sites logged new connections, the researchers could infer that they were being contacted by a system that had spied on one of their Tor network circuits. No one knows who is running the spying nodes: they could be run by criminals, governments, private suppliers of "infowar" weapons to governments, independent researchers, or other scholars (though scholarly research would not normally include attempts to hack the servers once they were discovered)." The Tor project is aware of the attack and is working to redesign its system to try and block it.

Submission + - In Dallas: The first use of a robot by law enforcement to kill

Submission + - George Takei Opposes Gay Sulu in 'Star Trek Beyond'

HughPickens.com writes: Seth Abramovitch reports in the Hollywood Reporter that actor and LGBT activist George Takei says Paramount's plans to have Sulu's character in the upcoming 'Star Trek Beyond' the first LGBTQ lead character in Star Trek history is out of step with what creator Gene Roddenberry would have wanted. [Roddenberry] "was a strong supporter of LGBT equality," says Takei, now 79. "But he said he has been pushing the envelope and walking a very tight rope — and if he pushed too hard, the show would not be on the air." Takei says he'd much prefer that Sulu stay straight. "I’m delighted that there’s a gay character," says Takei. "Unfortunately, it’s a twisting of Gene’s creation, to which he put in so much thought. I think it’s really unfortunate." The timeline logic of the new revelation is enough to befuddle even the most diehard of Trek enthusiasts, as the rebooted trilogy takes place before the action of the original series. In other words, assuming canon orthodoxy, this storyline suggest Sulu would have had to have first been gay and married, only to then go into the closet years later.

Simon Pegg, who has co-written the latest Star Trek movie, as well as starring as Scotty, has responded to criticism by the actor George Takei at the film-makers’ decision to make the character he used to play openly gay. “He’s right, it is unfortunate, it’s unfortunate that the screen version of the most inclusive, tolerant universe in science fiction hasn’t featured an LGBT character until now. We could have introduced a new gay character, but he or she would have been primarily defined by their sexuality, seen as the ‘gay character’, rather than simply for who they are, and isn’t that tokenism?” says Pegg. “Our Trek is an alternate timeline with alternate details. Whatever magic ingredient determines our sexuality was different for Sulu in our timeline. I like this idea because it suggests that in a hypothetical multiverse, across an infinite matrix of alternate realities, we are all LGBT somewhere."

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