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Comment I Tried YikYak (Score 1) 69

I tried YikYak and I still fire it up maybe once a week - to post content from the perspective of a bear, which is kind of fun. I raided some lady's bird feeder last week and told everyone all about it.

But I live out in a semi-rural area. One of YikYak's problems is that it only has content if you're near other people that post content. I, myself, posting maybe once a week, am about 25% of the content in my area. The other 70% is people looking for marijuana or sex, with the remaining 5% of people talking about a crazy bear.

So, it's not a compelling product for a vast section of America. If you live in a city? Cool, great idea, nice product. Out where I am, which is most of America? Not really useful.

Comment Re:Missing the point.. (Score 4, Insightful) 540

Also, it is the easy, brain-dead jobs that are gong to go out of existence. The jobs that support the automation? Robotics engineers, software engineers, mechanics. These are higher end jobs that require education and training.

Sure, there's always going to be menial labor jobs, but they'll be fewer. Look at what is poised to happen in the fast food industry.

Essentially, if you are not reasonably intelligent, you are going to have some serious issues getting employment within 20-30 years. Maybe even sooner than that.

The GOOD thing is that with lower production costs, it will become less costly to live so maybe these things will balance out as they always have in the past. The future economy, though, looks like it will be vastly different than what we have today.

But, then again, to be fair... People said the exact same thing about the Industrial Revolution. Machines are going to take over! No jobs for anyone! But what really happened was jobs for everyone and things were great.

Based on history and evidence there isn't much to fear, but I just feel that things aren't quite the same this time around...

Comment Re: Supply and demand (Score 5, Insightful) 587

I've had good experiences with development teams from China, actually, but that's just one data point. India, however...

It's like the developers out of India simply don't care. Code quality, functionality, deadlines, figuring anything out on their own, the amount of hand-holding I've had to do is extremely frustrating. So, I spent some time one night searching the 'net and looking for information on how the schools work over there.

Turns out that many of the schools in India don't actually teach you much. Their courses are geared towards rote memorization and following instructions. If you want them to do A, and only A, with no changes, they can do A very, very well. Once you deviate from A, even just a bit, they won't know what to do.

They call it "mugging" over in India (and no, not mugging as in attacking someone and stealing their cash - I have no idea how the term came to be). You memorize. You don't deviate. You do not think for yourself. You do not understand a concept and come up with a solution; you only follow the solution that's been provided.

It really does seem to explain all of the issues I've ever had with IT workers out of India. There's limited capability for problem solving because they're not taught how to solve problems in a general sense, they're simply taught the solution to a specific set of problems. Give them a step by step set of instructions and it will be done - but then why not just automate?

In contrast, American schools push students to understand concepts first and then apply them to find a solution. We're trained to solve problems and to think. That seems to be the core difference.

Comment Re:Technical OR legislative? (Score 1) 351

I don't know where you live, but here in the US, some people were trying to push through anti-encryption legislation that technically outlawed lossy compression, like JPEG, as well.

So, we better hop onto the technological solution train Right Now, otherwise we're going to get people passing crappy laws on things that they don't understand because "well someone has to do something!" and we're all going to suffer for it.

Comment Oh Boy! (Score 1) 199

Well, you know, the new rules and regulations we added ended up having all kinds of unintended consequences (that people warned about repeatedly, my goodness, who would have thought), so let's add yet another system on top of the existing pile of crap. Soon it will be just like a Microsoft product! Can't wait! Nothing says "Freedom" like more interference!

Comment Re:When everything you do (Score 1) 541

That's the thing.

I see a lot of criticism thrown towards systemd, and it does violate the "single responsibility done well" philosophy. I've also seen criticisms of the bugs, how it isn't ready for production systems, how troubleshooting is very difficult, how the maintainers are not receptive to suggestions/bugs/fixes, etc., etc. I think these are very valid concerns.

And yet, many distributions are moving to it.

Unless there is some kind of Super Secret Linux Conspiracy, you know, like some kind of George Soros of the Linux world, then the only other explanation is that systemd is offering some kind of improved utility that the initd system lacks.

We're not the kind of people that would replace such a critical piece of core functionality on a whim. If it is broken the entire system is going to be in a very sorry state.

So what does systemd offer that is worth that kind of risk?

Comment Re:WE need unions also why train your h1-b replamn (Score 4, Insightful) 472

Unions do all kinds of wonderful things.

They make it incredibly difficult to fire under performing workers, for example. That lazy guy who never finishes anything on time? Yeah, can't fire him. Can't even discipline him.

Unions take your dues - which will not be small - and will use them to prop up politicians. Politicians that you may not like.

Unions may raise your wages, sure, but that will also raise the cost of your company doing business. That means your company will need to charge more, meaning more work for the non-union shops because they're less expensive.

Unions will make sure that you are promoted based on years of experience, not skill or knowledge. So that moron who doesn't know the difference between an integer and a float, but has been here 20 years? He's getting paid more than you and always will.

Speaking of, are you particularly valuable as an employee? That's nice. You may be super smart, very talented, incredibly fast at what you do, but too bad. You're getting union scale pay.

No, we don't need unions. Is your company crappy? Leave. Find a job somewhere else. That company will have to learn to treat their workers better or they'll be stuck with a perpetual revolving door, with no work getting done.

It worked at my company. We weren't being treated well. A ton of people quit. Company wised up, started treated existing employees better, increased pay and benefits. No union needed - just a free market.

Comment Re:Obvious causes in no particular order: (Score 1) 643

What rape hysteria?

Might I remind you of articles like this one, or how, especially on college campuses, someone accused of rape is guilty before being proven innocent. Worse, they're often still guilty, even after the evidence is in their favor. Colleges will throw out people accused of rape even if the crime is not proven in the court of law.

All it takes is someone with an accusation and you're automatically the bad person.

Then you get into real ridiculous territory about what defines rape. It doesn't even need to include physical contact. There have been rape cases brought against people because they asked about having sex more than once.

That's not rape. It may be annoying, and in extreme cases it could be harassment, but it isn't rape.

So yes, there is a "rape hysteria" going on, because the SJWs especially on college campuses are getting way out of control.

Comment Never Thought Amazon Would Work (Score 4, Interesting) 67

When Amazon was just starting out, I thought, "Why would someone want to buy books online? It's so much better to go to a book store, you can see the books, thumb through them, see what you're getting before you put any money down, etc."

When YouTube launched I thought, "Who the hell wants to watch stupid cat videos?"

When Twitter launched I thought, "140 characters? That'll never take off..."

I'm reeeeeeally bad at predicting things, obviously... (o:

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