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Submission + - Clinton Foundation works with Big Pharma to keep the price of US AIDS drugs high (

Okian Warrior writes: A newly released Podesta E-mail explains how the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) works to keep the price of AIDS medicines high in the US. CHAI contracted with Big Pharma companies for AIDS drugs to be distributed in developing countries. In return, the group agreed to resist efforts to bring similarly lower cost and generic drugs to the US. The email is a reaction to "comments President Clinton made on lowering domestic AIDS drugs prices at the World AIDS day event":

[...]We have always told the drug companies that we would not pressure them and create a slippery slope where prices they negotiate with us for poor countries would inevitably lead to similar prices in rich countries.

[...] If we do try to do something in this area, we suggest that we approach the innovator companies that can currently sell products in the US with the idea of making donations to help clear the ADAP lists. For a variety of reasons, the companies will likely favor a donation approach rather than one that erodes prices across the board.

[...] I would guess that they would also likely favor a solution that involved their drugs rather than an approach that allowed generic drugs from India to flood the US market at low prices or one that set a precedent of waiving patent laws on drugs. ... We can go to war with the US drug companies if President Clinton would like to do so, but we would not suggest it.

Submission + - Votes Switched From Trump to Hillary in Texas ( 1

Okian Warrior writes: Early voting for the 2016 presidential election started yesterday for people in some areas who have been given the opportunity to avoid the long lines on November 8.

However, in Amarillo, a woman was shocked to see her ballot flip from Republican to Democrat.

“Gary and I went to early vote today,” wrote Lisa Houlette on Facebook. “I voted a straight Republican ticket and as I scrolled to submit my ballot I noticed that the Republican straight ticket was highlighted, however, the Clinton/Kaine box was also highlighted!”

“I tried to go back and change and could not get it to work. I asked for help from one of the workers and she couldn’t get it to go back either. It took a second election person to get the machine to where I could correct the vote to a straight ticket,” she added.

Submission + - Google Research Suggests President Did Kids No Favors By Banning Daily Tech Time

theodp writes: Exploring racial and gender gaps in computer science learning that Silicon Valley says explains its low percentages of women and minorities, Google offers up new research — a "Little Data" survey of 1,571 U.S. students in 7th-12th grade — that suggests students are unlikely to grow up to be CS cowgirls and cowboys without daily use of computers at home. "Black (58%) and Hispanic (50%) students are less likely than White students (68%) to use a computer at home at least most days of the week," explains Diversity Gaps in Computer Science: Exploring the Underrepresentation of Girls, Blacks and Hispanics [curiously, no survey results are provided for Asian students — the most successful AP CS group]. "This could influence their confidence in learning CS because, as this study finds, students who use computers less at home are less confident in their ability to learn CS." In a 2015 interview, President Obama explained that he had encouraged his two daughters to learn to code, although they hadn't taken to it the way he’d like. "I think they got started a little bit late," the president conjectured. "Part of what you want to do is introduce this with the ABCs and the colors." But if Google's research is to be believed, could the First Family's famous ban on tech time during the week have had something to do with his daughters' failure to embrace CS?

Submission + - The News Is Now Literally a Video Game (

mirandakatz writes: A team that worked on BuzzFeed has turned its attentions toward, once again, changing how young people consume the news—this time, through 8-bit games called things like "Thoughts and Prayers" and "Trump's Pussy Grabber." The GOP Arcade is their first experiment, focusing specifically on the 2016 election, but now they're looking ahead toward a new venture that'll be something like The Onion meets The Daily Show, in game form. Will it take off?

Submission + - Filmmaker Arrested At Pipeline Protest Facing 45 Years In Felony Charges (

walterbyrd writes: The lengths that the oil industry, and their puppet politicians, will go to suppress information is amazing. 45 years is way more than most people get for murder.

Deia Schlosberg, the producer of the upcoming documentary “How to Let Go of the World and Love All Things Climate Can’t Change,” was detained while filming a protest against TransCanada’s Keystone Pipeline in Walhalla, North Dakota. Activists at the event, associated with the group Climate Direct Action, shut down the pipeline, which carries oil from Canadian tar sands to the U.S, for about seven hours.

Submission + - ORWL Open and secure computer Not So Open.

Dr. Crash writes: ORWL (the open-sourced physically secure computer) crowdsourced on CrowdSupply has revealed their licensing model.... which isn't closed, but not much better.
* Schematics only "rendered" — as PDF, impeding mechanized analysis for holes. "Source" (i.e. Cadence files) requires an NDA
* PCB layouts are available only as Gerber files. "Source" (i.e. Allegra files) again requires an NDA
* Mechanical CAD files and BIOS: Only via NDA.
Is it just me, or does it strike other readers that for a computer that's supposed to be open-sourced and inspectable, releasing only the equivalent of "assembly code" (PDFs of the schematic, Gerber files) and requiring an NDA for the BIOS and mechanical security just doesn't cut it? in particular, revealing only the PDF'ed schematics and the Gerbers make it essentially impossible to improve the device, and without the BIOS being inspectable, the security of the whole system is completely compromised.

Read the release info yourself at:

Submission + - Careful, we might nuke you: The consequences of rejecting a nuclear no-first-use (

Lasrick writes: Since developing nuclear weapons in 1945, the United States has maintained the right to use them first against another country, regardless of whether that country launched a nuclear attack at the US. Over the past several months President Obama has considered changing that “first-use” optional policy to one under which the US declares that it will only use nuclear weapons in response to a nuclear attack, a 'no-first-use' posture. Press reports now assert that key members of the president’s cabinet all opposed the move, including Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, Secretary of State John Kerry, and Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz. There are reasonable arguments on both sides of the no-first-use debate, but unfortunately, there may be negative consequences for raising the issue publicly and then rejecting it. Nuclear security expert James Doyle explains what those consequences are.

Submission + - Clinton's IT contractor sought help removing to/from addresses on arcived emails (

An anonymous reader writes: An employee with Platte River Networks, the company in charge of Hillary Clinton’s home server, who was granted immunity from Obama’s Department of Justice in their investigation of Clinton, reportedly asked for assistance in July 2014 from Reddit users on how to purge emails and how to strip VIP’s email address from “a bunch of archived emails":

"Hello all- I may be facing a very interesting situation where I need to strip out a VIP’s (VERY VIP) email address from a bunch of archived email that I have both in a live Exchange mailbox, as well as a PST file. Basically, they don’t want the VIP’s email address exposed to anyone, and want to be able to either strip out or replace the email address in the to/from fields in all of the emails we want to send out. I am not sure if something like this is possible with PowerShell, or exporting all of the emails to MSG and doing find/replaces with a batch processing program of some sort. Does anyone have experience with something like this, and/or suggestions on how this might be accomplished?"

Submission + - Carl Malamud's fight to make public info public has now landed him in court (

mirandakatz writes: For some 25 years, Carl Malamud has been fighting for open internet and government—from encouraging activists to download huge numbers of paywall-blocked federal court documents to publishing state annotated codes online and petitioning the Republic of India to do the same. He's on a lonely mission to capitalize on the internet’s potential for spreading information, and now, it's landed him in court: today, he's headed to DC to defend himself in two separate lawsuits.

Submission + - SPAM: The government vs the people of Louisiana

schwit1 writes: During the recent flooding in Louisiana, it was repeatedly the government vs ordinary citizens as people scrambled to deal with the disaster.

The government was repeatedly in the way and working to prevent people from helping themselves. In fact, it often seemed more interested in collecting fees and paperwork than allowing people to be rescued or homes to be rebuilt.

Submission + - Continuing progress on "In Situ Resource Utilization" for space exploration. ( 2

RockDoctor writes: Many Slashdot readers will have heard of Robert Zubrin with his plans for launching self-contained rocket fuel plants to Mars to convert 1kg of hydrogen (supplied from Earth) to 18kg of oxygen/ methane to be used as rocket fuel to return explorers to Earth. This is an example of Utilizing (using) In Situ (already there) Resources (Mars' CO2 atmosphere) to reduce launch costs (masses) from Earth to achieve desired aims in space exploration at more affordable costs.

In 2013, the Journal of Aerospace Engineering ran a special volume on "In Situ Resource Utilization" with 20 papers on the subject. (These are paywalled, unless you know of tools like Sci-Hub to read the work paid for by your taxes.)

Yesterday, one of the editors of that special volume, Philip Metzger (a NASA planetary scientist specialising in the properties of Lunar soils) released a paper on Arxiv expanding on his contribution to that 2013 volume and detailing a roadmap for humanity to take gain control of the Solar System in order to solve problems on Earth. In the 2013 paper, Dr Metzger asserted (with working) that

bootstrapping can be achieved with as little as 12 t landed on the Moon during a period of about 20 years. [ I know it's Slashdot but RTFAFFS ! ...] The industry grows exponentially because of the free real estate, energy, and material resources of space. The mass of industrial assets at the end of bootstrapping will be 156 t with 60 humanoid robots or as high as 40,000 t. [...] Within another few decades with no further investment, it can have millions of times the industrial capacity of the United States. Modeling over wide parameter ranges indicates this is reasonable, but further analysis is needed.

The 2016 Arxiv paper produces some of the results of that further analysis, concentrating in particular on the need to develop a "water economy [..] to manufacture rocket propellant" from in situ resources on the Moon and later the asteroids.

The 2013 paper's abstract ends with one of the milder understatements in history.

"This industry promises to revolutionize the human condition."

Without doubt, Slashdot will contribute much heat and little light from typing hordes who haven't read either paper to dilute their ignorance, but analyses like this are not, as frequently described, the work of "space nutters" but realistic possibilities. Realistic until the author sees the fatal stumbling block to all such dreams :

"It will require a sustained commitment of several decades to complete."

— a level of dedication that humans have not shown themselves capable of for centuries, even for their highest achievement to date, war.

Submission + - Cops are finding sneaky new ways to catch texting drivers (

schwit1 writes: It can wait

State police in Chattanooga, Tennessee, have been known to patrol in a tractor-trailer so they can sit up high and spot drivers texting behind the wheel. In Bethesda, Maryland, a police officer disguised himself as a homeless man, stood near a busy intersection and radioed ahead to officers down the road about texting drivers. In two hours last October, police gave out 56 tickets. And in West Bridgewater, Massachusetts, south of Boston, an officer regularly tools around town on his bicycle, pedals up to drivers at stoplights and hands them $105 tickets.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates nearly 3,500 people were killed in crashes involving distracted drivers in the mainland US and Puerto Rico in 2015, up from almost 3,200 in 2014. The number of deaths in which cellphones were the distraction rose from 406 in 2014 to 476 in 2015.

But many safety advocates say crashes involving cellphones are vastly underreported because police are forced to rely on what they are told by drivers, many of whom aren’t going to admit they were using their phones.

Submission + - Is Apache OpenOffice finally on the way out? (

JImbob0i0 writes: After almost another year without a release and another major CVE leaving users vulnerable for that year the Chairman of the Project Management Committee has started public discussions on what it will entail to retire the project, following the Apache Board showing concern at the poor showing.

It's been a long battle which would have been avoided if Oracle had not been so petty. Did this behaviour actually help get momentum in the community underway though? What ifs are always hard to properly answer.

Hopefully this long drawn out death rattle will finally come to a close and the wounds with LibreOffice can heal with the last few contributors to AOO joining the rest of the community.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Is anyone concerned that Men Die 5 Years earlier than Women? ( 1

BuckB writes: So many stories lately about Women's Equality Day, Breast Cancer, and even the best places to live (for women — answer, Hawaii). However, there really are no headlines, stories, or even articles about men's mortality rates. Do people not know, not care, or just accept it as a fact that men, for example, die seven years before women in the idolized Hawaii or ridiculed DC?

Submission + - Something "Unexpected" Happened When Seattle Raised The Minimum Wage

schwit1 writes: The latest research comes from the University of Washington which researched the impact of Seattle's recent minimum wage hike on employment in that city (as background, Seattle recently passed legislation that increased it's minimum wage to $11 per hour on April 1, 2015, $13 on January 1, 2016 and $15 on January 1, 2017). "Shockingly", the University of Washington found that Seattle's higher minimum wages "lowered employment rates of low-wage workers" (the report is attached in its entirety at the end of this post).

Yet, our best estimates find that the Seattle Minimum Wage Ordinance appears to have lowered employment rates of low-wage workers. This negative unintended consequence (which are predicted by some of the existing economic literature) is concerning and needs to be followed closely in future years, because the long-run effects are likely to be greater as businesses and workers have more time to adapt to the ordinance. Finally, we find only modest impacts on earnings. The effects of disemployment appear to be roughly offsetting the gain in hourly wage rates, leaving the earnings for the average low-wage worker unchanged. Of course, we are talking about the average result.

More specifically, we find that median wages for low-wage workers (those earning less than $11 per hour during the 2nd quarter of 2014) rose by $1.18 per hour, and we estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was to increase these workers’ median wage by $0.73 per hour. Further, while these low-wage workers increased their likelihood of being employed relative to prior years, this increase was less than in comparison regions. We estimate that the impact of the Ordinance was a 1.1 percentage point decrease in likelihood of low-wage Seattle workers remaining employed. While these low-wage workers increased their quarterly earnings relative to prior years, the estimated impact of the Ordinance on earnings is small and sensitive to the choice of comparison region. Finally, for those who kept their job, the Ordinance appears to have improved wages and earnings, but decreased their likelihood of being employed in Seattle relative other parts of the state of Washington.

Still not convinced? How about a recent report from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco that finds that "higher minimum wage results in some job loss for the least-skilled workers—with possibly larger adverse effects than earlier research suggested."

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