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Submission + - Mexican Scientists Successfully Test Vaccine that Could Cut Heroin Addiction (guardian.co.uk)

JumperCable writes: Scientists at Mexico's National Institute of Psychiatry say they have successfully tested the vaccine on mice and are preparing to test it on humans. The vaccine, makes the body resistant to the effects of heroin, so users would no longer get a rush of pleasure. Mice given the vaccine showed a huge drop in heroin consumption.

Submission + - Security Firm that "Outed" Anoymous Hacked (dailykos.com) 1

JumperCable writes: Less than 24 hours since the security firm HBGay Federal released a press release claiming to have outed anonymous, hackers have "seized control of the internet security firm's website, defaced its pages, acquired 60,000 company e-mails, deleted backup files, seized Barr's Twitter account, and took down the founder's website rootkit.com. This is according to a daily Kos post from one of the "outed" self proclaimed member of anonymous

Too boot, hackers have also publicly released a 28 page document that the security firm was attempting to sell the government. According to Barret Brown, "The entry on me, for instance, is entirely inaccurate despite the fact that I have not been a clandestine participant since coming out of the closet months ago." The firm is further mocked with a statement by Bernard Keane, that "the situation is rather hilarious. More to the point, it should demonstrate that HBGary Federal is not only incapable of protecting its clients and informing on folks who were among the first to get involved in Tunisia and Egypt — it is incapable of protecting itself."

Disclaimer: I'm NOT involved in this.

Submission + - Which 12 ISPs Pass Info to Project Vigilant? (forbes.com)

JumperCable writes: Forbes had a blog post yesterday about the outing of the wikileaks video. The author wrote

A semi-secret government contractor that calls itself Project Vigilant surfaced at the Defcon security conference Sunday with a series of revelations: that it monitors the traffic of 12 regional Internet service providers, hands much of that information to federal agencies, and encouraged one of its "volunteers," researcher Adrian Lamo, to inform the federal government about the alleged source of a controversial video of civilian deaths in Iraq leaked to whistle-blower site Wikileaks in April.

More disturbing to me than the outing of the Wikileaks video whistle blower, is to find out who now has access to my private browsing habits.

He says the 600-person "volunteer" organization functions as a government contractor bridging public and private sector security efforts. Its mission: to use a variety of intelligence-gathering efforts to help the government attribute hacking incidents.

one of Project Vigilant's manifold methods for gathering intelligence includes collecting information from a dozen regional U.S. Internet service providers (ISPs). Uber declined to name those ISPs, but said that because the companies included a provision allowing them to share users' Internet activities with third parties in their end user license agreements (EULAs), Vigilant was able to legally gather data from those Internet carriers and use it to craft reports for federal agencies. A Vigilant press release says that the organization tracks more than 250 million IP addresses a day and can "develop portfolios on any name, screen name or IP address." "We don't do anything illegal," says Uber. "If an ISP has a EULA to let us monitor traffic, we can work with them. If they don't, we can't."

So who are these 12 ISPs? Why are volunteers being given access to my private browsing information? And who else is this private contractor selling my information to besides the government?


Submission + - Ginkgo Doesn't Improve Memory or Cognative Skills (cnn.com)

JumperCable writes: CNN reports

Ginkgo biloba has failed — again — to live up to its reputation for boosting memory and brain function. Just over a year after a study showed that the herb doesn't prevent dementia and Alzheimer's disease, a new study from the same team of researchers has found no evidence that ginkgo reduces the normal cognitive decline that comes with aging.

In the new study, the largest of its kind to date, DeKosky and his colleagues followed more than 3,000 people between the ages of 72 and 96 for an average of six years. Half of the participants took two 120-milligram capsules of ginkgo a day during the study period, and the other half took a placebo. The people who took ginkgo showed no differences in attention, memory, and other cognitive measures compared to those who took the placebo, according to the study, which was published in this week's Journal of the American Medical Association.

And of course, the link to the study. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/full/302/24/2663?home

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