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Submission + - Hacking Group Linked to Chinese Army Caught Attacking Dummy Water Plant (technologyreview.com) 4

holy_calamity writes: MIT Technology Review reports that APT1, the China-based hacking group said to steal data from U.S. companies, has been caught taking over a decoy water plant control system. The honeypot mimicked the remote access control panels and physical control system of a U.S. municipal water plant. The decoy was one of 12 set up in 8 countries around the world, which together attracted more than 70 attacks, 10 of which completely compromised the control system. China and Russia were the leading sources of the attacks. The researcher behind the study says his results provide the first clear evidence that people actively seek to exploit the many security problems of industrial systems.

Submission + - A Shot of Coffee That Gets You Drunk (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: Researchers have found a way to turn used coffee grounds into an alcoholic beverage. They heated the remnants in water at 163C for 45 minutes, separated out the liquid, and added sugar. Next, the team mixed in yeast cells, let the concoction ferment, and concentrated the sample to get a higher alcohol content. And voilà! Used coffee grounds produced a new alcoholic beverage with 40% ethanol, comparable to other hard liquor such as vodka and tequila. Taste testers described the drink as smelling like coffee and tasting bitter and pungent. Researchers noted that the taste could be improved with age and concluded that the quality was good enough for consumption. Don’t count on the caffeine to keep you awake, however; most of it disappears in the brewing process.

Submission + - Android Tablets Outsell iPad For First Time (ibtimes.com)

coolnumbr12 writes: In the second quarter, more Android tablets shipped worldwide than Apple iPads for the first time. While Apple still sold the most tablets, its domination of the tablet market slipped from 71.2 percent a year ago to 42.7 percent. Apple sold a total of 14.6 million iPad units in Q2 2013. Coming in second was Samsung with 7.3 million tablets, and increase of 294.8 percent from the year-ago quarter. The rest — Amazon, Lenovo and Acer — also each saw drastic increases in sales.
Displays

Submission + - Smart Sunglasses Block Glare Using LCD Tech (ecouterre.com) 3

An anonymous reader writes: The sunglasses of the future are right around the corner — Physicist Chris Mullin has developed a new LCD technology that could lead to “smart” eyewear that detects bright spots of light and darkens them accordingly. Working with electrical engineer Albert Titus, Mullin has created a working “Dynamic Eyes” prototype that shield sensitive eyes and makes it easier for drivers to monitor oncoming traffic. The lenses are actually LCD screens, with pixels that can be turned on and off to black out certain areas. (A light-detecting sensor at the nose bridge works with a microprocessor to “tell” certain pixels where the glare is.) So far the project has attracted the interest of the U.S. Air Force, along with the automotive, recreational, and healthcare industries.
Moon

Submission + - Mysterious Moon 'Swirls': Nature's Graffiti? (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: "Etched across the surface of the moon are vast and often complex swirls in the lunar regolith. The Apollo astronauts saw them and our current orbiting lunar satellites are seeing them. But how did they get there? Is the solar wind to blame? Or is it the internal magnetic structure of the moon itself? Or is it perhaps something a little more extraordinary? Scientists, for now, don't have a clue."

Submission + - NH Man Arrested for Videotaping Police.. Again (nashuatelegraph.com) 1

OhPlz writes: Back in 2006, a resident of New Hampshire's second largest city was arrested while at the police station attempting to file a complaint against officers. His crime? He had video tape evidence of the officers' wrongdoings. According to the police, that's wiretapping.

After world wide attention, the police dropped the charges. His complaint was found to be valid, but the evidence never saw the light of day.

Well, guess what? Round two. There are differing reports, but again the police arrested Mr. Gannon and again, they seized his video camera. This time it's "falsifying evidence" because he tried to hand off the camera, most likely to protect its contents.

Once again, if the police are free to videotape us, why aren't we free to videotape them? If there's the potential of police wrongdoing, how is it that the law permits the police to seize the evidence?

Security

Submission + - Security consultants warn about PROTECT-IP Act (nationaljournal.com)

epee1221 writes: Several security professionals released a paper (PDF) raising objections to the DNS filtering mandated by the proposed PROTECT-IP Act. The measure allows courts to require Internet service providers to redirect or block queries for a domain deemed to be infringing on IP laws. ISPs will not be able to improve DNS security using DNSSEC, a system for cryptographically signing DNS records to ensure their authenticity, as the sort of manipulation mandated by PROTECT-IP is the type of interference DNSSEC is meant to prevent. The paper notes that a DNS server which has been compromised by a cracker would be indistinguishable from one operating under a court order to alter its DNS responses. The measure also points to a possible fragmenting of the DNS system, effectively making domain names non-universal, and the DNS manipulation may lead to collateral damage (i.e. filtering an infringing domain may block access to non-infringing content). It is also pointed out that DNS filtering does not actually keep determined users from accessing content, as they can still access non-filtered DNS servers or directly enter the blocked site's IP address if it is known.

A statement by the MPAA disputes these claims, arguing that typical users lack the expertise to select a different DNS server and that the Internet must not be allowed to "decay into a lawless Wild West."

Paul Vixie, a coauthor of the paper, elaborates in his blog.

Security

Submission + - When vuln disclosures are outlawed (theregister.co.uk)

doperative writes: 'Legal goons from Magix AG sent a nasty gram to a researcher who goes by "Acidgen" after he reported the stack buffer overflow in the company's Music Maker 16. According to the report, Acidgen alerted Magix representatives to the bug in several emails that also included proof-of-concept code that forced the Windows calculator to open, indicating the flaw could be exploited to execute malicious code on a victim's computer.

"They misunderstood that I was getting money for doing this ... and illegally breaking into networks" link

Comment: of course the vulnerability isn't in the application but in the underlying Operating System ...

Network

Submission + - US Senator Calls for DOJ Investigation of Sony PSN (ngohq.com)

An anonymous reader writes: US Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) today called for the Department of Justice to investigate all aspects of the Sony PlayStation Network data breach, sending Attorney General Eric Holder a letter urging DOJ “to immediately open an investigation to track down and hold accountable those who have stolen sensitive personal information, and to examine any potential wrongdoing in Sony’s response to this matter.”
Space

Submission + - Space Telescope to track objects in GEO orbit (spacenews.com)

FullBandwidth writes: A while back we reported on the DARPA Space Surveillance Telescope, though loyal slashdotters were divided on exactly what astronomers would be looking for. DARPA now makes it clear that the telescope will "enable wide-field views of objects in geostationary orbit" in support of the Air Force mission of "tracking satellites and other objects in Earth orbit and reporting that information to U.S. Strategic Command."
NASA

Submission + - NASA Satellite Shows Southern Tornadoes From Space (ibtimes.com)

gabbo529 writes: "NASA has gotten pretty good at using satellites to track natural disasters; and a tornado that twisted through the south was no different. Like it has done previously with earthquakes, hurricanes and tsunamis, a NASA satellite has captured a devastating natural disaster from a space satellite. An image acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) from NASA's Aqua satellite on April 28, distinctly shows three tornado tracks in Tuscaloosa, Ala."
Intel

Submission + - Silicon odometer might soon boost your CPU (extremetech.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Manufacturers like Intel and AMD criminally underclock their processors because they lack a way to accurately measure the aging of MOSFET transistors. A new silicon odometer, which uses a pair of ring oscillators to measure the "beat" of transistors, should enables on-die monitoring of transistor aging, and thus allows for much higher clock speeds.
Mozilla

Submission + - Mozilla patches Firefox 4, fixes coding bungle (computerworld.com)

CWmike writes: "Mozilla patched Firefox 4 for the first time on Thursday, fixing eight flaws, including a major programming oversight that left the browser as vulnerable to attack on Windows 7 as on the 10-year-old Windows XP.The company also plugged 15 holes in the still-supported Firefox 3.6, and issued its last security update for Firefox 3, which debuted in mid-2008. The most important of the bugs: a programming lapse that left Firefox 4 open to less-sophisticated attacks. 'The WebGLES libraries in the Windows version of Firefox were compiled without ASLR protection,' stated the advisory labeled MSFA 2011-17. 'An attacker who found an exploitable memory corruption flaw could then use these libraries to bypass ASLR on Windows Vista and Windows 7, making the flaw as exploitable on those platforms as it would be on Windows XP or other platforms.'"

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