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Submission + - What Geeky Things Must Be Done? 2

John writes: A few weeks ago, my friends were discussing "The Princess Bride", and most of the references went completely over my head — I've not seen it all the way through, nor read the book. Naturally, revealing this fact made these people look at me as if I'd just moved into town from under some rock. This led into a discussion of the things that most general geeks should be expected to know; for example, reciting the inscription on the One Ring, or (apparently) quoting "Princess Bride" on-demand. The suggestions we came up with ranged from personal things, like having one's movie/game library in an online database, to big, world-scoped things like contributing to an open-source project of your choosing. I'm curious to know what the general consensus is on the most obvious or biggest geek/nerd things that should be seen, done, or read/watched/heard.

Submission + - How to detect 'Botted' machines

Alpha830RulZ writes: "A couple of us at work are pretty sure that we have at least one compromised machine inside our firewall. We get a lot of SPAM that has contiguous email addresses from our company address book, and they have shown up in enough ways that it looks like some user's machine has been pretty well read over. This is happening repeatedly enough, and new employee's addresses are showing up, so I am concerned that we have some botted machines. We run current Symantec AV, corporate version, on all machines.

Everything I read about the Storm Worm and similar just scares the piss out of me. Is there any way for a normal sysadmin type to detected a Storm botted machine? We are familiar with the likes of rootkit revealer, and when we have had suspicions about a particular box, we run that, Kaspersky, Symantec, and Bitdefender. We haven't found anything definitive, but we have found:

— one machine that prevents Kaspersky from being installed on it. The install hangs on an access violation of a directory newly created by the Kaspersky installer during the install. Symantec, Rootkit Revealer, and Bitdefender find nothing on this machine.

— one machine that has entries deep in the user's temp directories which can't be deleted. These were found by Rootkit Revealer, but we haven't been able to remove them.

We've got the machines segregated for now, and are wondering what we can do to get a handle on this. Help me, my geek brethren."

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