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Comment Re:Hey, cable companies: (Score 2) 200

If the private company can't build a better network and provide better service than the people doing it for themselves then the private company doesn't get any business.

Even if the private company can build a better network at the same price, the customers of the private network will not just be paying that price--they don't become exempt from taxes, so they'd have to pay double. This prevents private networks from becoming successful.

What you would be saying is only correct if the people can choose to purchase the private network's service instead of the government network's service. This is not an option.

Comment Re:I bought counterfeit Gameboy Advanced Games the (Score 1) 64

I once bought a counterfeit Pokemon Emerald off of Ebay and it did *not* work great.

Pokemon Emerald uses flash memory for its save file which is a pain for counterfeiters to make, so they hack the game to use battery backup instead. When the game is hacked to use battery backup, you can't trade Pokemon to generation 4 or the Gamecube games (since those are external programs which don't know that the save file is stored in a different way so they look for it in the nonexistent flash memory) and in fact using those can destroy your save.

Also, of course the battery can run out.

I had to throw it out and buy a real one locally from Gamestop.

Comment Re:Meh (Score 2) 574

It is not the same as a news item whose author pursues the truth in good faith

The Washington Post did not post that in good faith. They posted it because Russian hackers have been used as an excuse to bash Trump, and the Washington Post's narrative is anti-Trump.

Also, the phrase "reckless disregard for the truth" applies here. They aren't excused from having posted fake news just because they didn't care if it was true and didn't bother checking.

Comment Just remember... (Score 1) 280

If you are going to say "programmers should refuse to program unethical things", remember that this will be taken to heart by programmers who have ethics different from yours. It's not only going to apply to drug websites.

We don't *want* programmers who are working on web sites for abortion clinics to do all they can to end the project because they have an "obligation" to avoid the "unethical behavior". (If you happen to be against abortion, imagine an example using a gun-rights website instead.)

Comment Re:Blame the news websites. (Score 2) 624

Apart from the click-bait headline, I think the actual content is valid.

Yes, and if the fake news had been in the first three sentences, you could have said "apart from the first three sentences, the actual content is valid". The headline was still posted by CNN, supposedly as part of a news article. They're not blameless just because the fakery is in the headline, especially since the headline is the part that the most people will see. A month later people won't remember exactly where they read that math is racist, but they'll have the idea in their head.

(Of course, "math is racist" is so absurd that people might reject it anyway, but they might remember a more plausible sounding but still fake one.)

Comment Re:It's not the phone number making it insecure (Score 3, Insightful) 106

It's the "one database key connecting everything" idea that makes it insecure, so that if there's a breach in anything, it becomes a breach in everything you're involved in. If phone numbers and email addresses were kept separate, then the effect of the bad security at the phone company would be limited in scope to the phone account only.

The lesson is that Big Data and specifically Google are evil for creating conditions where security breaches cause more damage than they otherwise would..

Comment Re:About time. (Score 0) 656

You still hve those freedoms in Australia. What you don't have is the right to claim you are a medical practitioner and

By that reasoning, if the government said that Jews aren't permitted to be nurses, you could reply "you still have the freedom to be a Jew; you just don't have the right to claim you are a medical practitioner and be a Jew".

Telling someone that they "still have a right to X, just not a right to work while being an X", is a limit on their freedom, regardless of what X is.

Comment Re:No it didn't (Score 1) 278

Spying on Americans, sure. Spying on foreign citizens is their actual job. There's nothing wrong with it (as long as they don't trade information with their foreign counterparts, giving each other what amounts to domestic information.)

It just gets a lot of publicity because foreign governments have lots of resources and media access, so they can manufacture outrage over it (while not bothering to mention to the same media that they themselves spy domestically.)

Comment Re:The last set showed laws broken by DNC (Score 5, Insightful) 333

...which leads one to ask why that isn't also happening?

Trump is an outsider. He's a Republican, but not part of the Republican establishment. The RNC wasn't on his side until the absolute last minute when they had to accept him as a candidate. So there isn't going to be any dirt about things the RNC did behind the scenes to help Trump.

Comment Re:Usual media FUD (Score 1) 517

Imagine that you have four people each trading exactly the same amount with each other. Now imagine drawing a line around one of the people and calling him a country, with no change in what he trades. You'll find that the one person exports 100% of his GDP while everyone else exports 25% of their GDP.

All you've done is made an argument about any tariffs anywhere, for any purpose. It' naturally falls out from the way small and large countries work; it has nothing to do specifically with the UK and Europe.

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