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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Why do we still believe in Evolution? 1

ta5tyfr3z writes: In a similar vein as a previous Slashdot article, why do we still believe in evolution? or, at least, why do we act as if evolution is incontrovertible and there are no divergent theories within the greater theory of evolution? Does questioning evolution make you anti-science? After all, if we're simply just a series of chemical reactions then applying the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics would mean that we would eventually all evolve into lower lifeforms. And observationally — note, we can't observe evolution on a mass scale in our lifetime -, most mutations (beyond changes in color or size) in large lifeforms seen in nature result in less functioning life forms.
Emulation (Games)

3dfx Voodoo Graphic Card Emulation Coming To DOSBox 156

KingofGnG writes with this excerpt from King Arthur's Den: "One of the forthcoming versions of the best PC-with-DOS emulator out there should include a very important architectural novelty, ie the software implementation of the historical Voodoo Graphics chipset created by 3dfx Interactive in the Nineties. "Kekko", the programmer working on the project with the aid of the DOSBox crew and the coding-capable VOGONS users, says that his aim is the complete and faithful emulation of SST-1, the first Voodoo chipset marketed in 1996 inside the first 3D graphics accelerated cards on the PC."
Classic Games (Games)

OpenTTD 1.0.0 Released 107

Gmer writes "Eming.com reports that OpenTTD, the open source clone of the Microprose game Transport Tycoon Deluxe, has reached a milestone. OpenTTD 1.0.0 has been released 6 years after work started on the first version, with the help of hundreds of contributors and thousands of testers/players. Over 30 language translations are considered complete, and OpenTTD is available for *BSD, Linux, Solaris and Windows. OpenTTD is a business simulation game in which the player is in control of a transport company and can compete against rival companies to make as much profit as possible by transporting passengers and various goods by road, rail, sea or air."
Games

AbleGamers Reviews Games From a Disability Standpoint 125

eldavojohn writes "Early last month a visually impaired gamer sued Sony under the Americans with Disabilities Act (and if you think that people with disabilities don't play games, think again). The AbleGamers Foundation has decided to step forward and provide a rating system for games that blends together a number of factors to determine a score with regard to accessibility. Visual, hearing, motion, closed captioning, speed settings, difficulty settings and even colorblindness options are all taken into account when compiling these scores and reviewing these games."
Science

Submission + - Balloon 100,000ft up - with a digital camera

hype7 writes: "An Australian student at Deakin University had a fascinating idea for a final project — to send a balloon up 100,000ft (~30,000 metres) into the stratosphere with a digital camera attached. The university was supportive, and the project took shape. Although there were some serious hitches along the way, the project was successful, and he managed to retrieve the balloon — with the pictures. What's really amazing is that the total cost was so low; the most expensive part was buying the helium gas for approximately AUD$250 (~USD$200)."
Politics

Submission + - Large Hadron Collider Scientist Arrested 1

mindbrane writes: A scientist working as a subcontractor on a peripheral LHC project has been arrested as a terrorist. The CBC is running a story outlining the arrest of a man on Thursday in south-east France for suspected al-Qaeda links. "CERN officials said the man, whose name has not been revealed, was working under contract with an outside institute and said he had no contact with anything that could have been used for terrorism. He had been at CERN since 2003, officials said."

"The news that someone with terrorist connections might have worked at the facility is likely to cause concern because of both the high profile of the giant physics experiment and also the technology in use, which has made some members of the public nervous."

"Before it started in September 2008, the particle collider drew protests from Europeans worried it would trigger a disaster, with some scenarios suggesting the accelerator would create a black hole that would swallow the Earth. Physicists and CERN officials dismissed the concerns, with the LHC project leader saying in 2008, "Obviously, the world will not end when the LHC switches on.""

Other than sabotage of the LHC and the creation of a world destroying black hole, the arrest begs the question what possible collateral damage could a terrorist achieve?

Submission + - Australian Goverment to break up Telstra (abc.net.au)

benz001 writes: The same Minister in charge of the ridiculous broadband filter plan has at least won a few brownie points with today's press conference (http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/09/15/2686143.htm). Telstra, Australia's largest ISP and the countries main infrastructure owner is to voluntarily split off its network and wholesale arms or the Goverment will step in with legislation.

The official press release can be found on the Ministers site (http://www.minister.dbcde.gov.au/media/media_releases/2009/088)

Earth

Submission + - Dogs as Intelligent as Average Two-Year-Old Child

Ponca City, We love you writes: "The Telegraph reports that researchers using tests originally designed to demonstrate the development of language, pre-language and basic arithmetic in human children have found that dogs are capable of understanding up to 250 words and gestures, can count up to five and can perform simple mathematical calculations putting them on par with the average two-year-old child. While most dogs understand simple commands such as sit, fetch and stay, a border collie tested by Professor Coren showed a knowledge of 200 spoken words. "Obviously we are not going to be able to sit down and have a conversation with a dog, but like a two-year-old, they show that they can understand words and gestures," says Professor Stanley Coren, a leading expert on canine intelligence at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. Coren has also found that dogs can count using established tests developed for young children. and when something unexpected happens with an object, children and dogs will stare at it for a longer period of time. "Dogs can tell that one plus one should equal two and not one or three.," says Coren adding that dogs "can also deliberately deceive, which is something that young children only start developing later in their life." Coren believes centuries of selective breeding and living alongside humans has helped to hone the intelligence of dogs. "They may not be Einsteins, but are sure closer to humans than we thought.""
Graphics

HTML 5 Canvas Experiment Hints At Things To Come 321

An anonymous reader writes with an interesting and impressive demonstration of modern browsers' HTML 5 capabilities. "From the 9elements blog: 'HTML5 is getting a lot of love lately. With the arrival of Firefox 3.5, Safari 4 and the new 3.0 beta of Google Chrome, browsers support some great new features including canvas and the new audio/video tags. [...] We've created a little experiment which loads 100 tweets related to HTML 5 and displays them using a javascript-based particle engine.' The site warns "(beware: sophisticated browser needed)"; Firefox 3.5 seems to work fine.
United States

Submission + - Bill ready to ban ISP caps in the US

xclr8r writes: Ars has a story on Eric Massa a congressman representing a district in western New York has a bill ready that would start treating Internet providers like a utility and stop the use of caps. Nearby locales have been used as test beds for the new caps so this may have made the constituents raise the issue with their representative.
Google

Submission + - Google trying to make <video> H.264 only? (whatwg.org)

David Gerard writes: "Google Chrome includes Ogg support for the <video> element. It also includes support for the hideously encumbered H.264 format. Nice as an extra, but ... they're also testing HTML5 YouTube only for H.264 — meaning the largest video provider on the Net will make H.264 the primary codec and relegate the equally good open format Ogg Theora firmly to the sidelines. Mike Shaver from Mozilla has fairly unambiguously asked Chris diBona from Google what the heck Google thinks it's doing. We all eagerly await the answer to the question: "WTF?""
Security

Submission + - New attack exploits virtually all intranets, VPNs (threatpost.com) 1

redsoxh8r writes: Security researcher Robert Hansen, known as Rsnake, has developed a new class of attacks that abuses a weakness in many corporate intranets and most browsers to compromise remote machines with persistent JavaScript backdoors. Threatpost reports: "The attacks rely on the long-term caching policies of some browsers and take advantage of the collisions that can occur when two different networks use the same non-routable IP address space, which happens fairly often because the amount of address space is quite small. The bottom line is that even a moderately skilled attacker has the ability to compromise remote machines without the use of any vulnerability or weakness in the client software. "If you're even vaguely clever, developing this might take you two hours. It's not that difficult," said Robert Hansen, the researcher who wrote about the attacks in a white paper published this week, called "RFC1918 Caching Security Issues."
Software

Submission + - Canada rejects business method patents (michaelgeist.ca)

Lorien_the_first_one writes: "Canadian Patent Appeal Board Rules Against Business Method Patents

The Canadian Patent Appeal Board determined that "[Yet] the panel delivered very strong language rejecting the mere possibility of business method patents under Canadian law. The panel noted that 'since patenting business methods would involve a radical departure from the traditional patent regime, and since the patentability of such methods is a highly contentious matter, clear and unequivocal legislation is required for business methods to be patentable.'"

"In applying that analysis to the Amazon.com one-click patent, the panel concluded that 'concepts or rules for the more efficient conduct of online ordering, are methods of doing business. Even if these concepts or rules are novel, ingenious and useful, they are still unpatentable because they are business methods.'" Looks like the US courts could face some peer pressure. :)"

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