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Comment Programmers are not statesmen (Score 1) 280

It's great when as individuals we have the luxury of choosing where we work. I'm at a point in my career where I have that luxury and I use it. I'd leave a place that frustrates me enough, either in terms of mission, management, or coworkers. As a group though, a lot of us lack that choice, and even for those who do, when they step away the employer will just find someone else to deal with the crap they left behind, because funds are sustenance, we've all got to eat, and if there are spare funds to hire people, more people will keep entering the industry (it's not like other industries are exempt from this - they often have it worse).

None of this means we should give up on trying to make the world a better place, for those of us who have that ideal. We just usually will lack the leverage to do much, like almost everybody else. And if we start with the idea that we're wiser, more ethical, or the people who are uniquely situated to debug society's ills, we're starting with a significant handicap.

Comment Re:Not a strong enough tie (Score 1) 236

I'm not sure what "you people" you imagine me to be part of.

As to the "you never call" bit, FISA doesn't apply or do what you think it does if you're seriously suggesting that. Even if we imagine some alternate world where it were entirely different but kept that name, you might want to look into "sovereign immunity" as a doctrine. It does not alone decide the issue (see also the "stripping doctrine"), but there are many hurdles to meet to do as you say even were it basically plausible. Which it is not.

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