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Submission + - Crunchbang Linux Halts Development (crunchbang.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Philip Newborough, the developer behind CrunchBang Linux, has put an end to work on the distro. CrunchBang was built as a layer on top of Debian using the Openbox window manager that focused on performance and customization. Newborough says the changing landscape of Linux over the past decade has obviated the need for a distro like CrunchBang. "Whilst some things have stayed exactly the same, others have changed beyond all recognition. It’s called progress, and for the most part, progress is a good thing. That said, when progress happens, some things get left behind, and for me, CrunchBang is something that I need to leave behind. I’m leaving it behind because I honestly believe that it no longer holds any value, and whilst I could hold on to it for sentimental reasons, I don’t believe that would be in the best interest of its users, who would benefit from using vanilla Debian."

Submission + - LibreSSL Project Announced

An anonymous reader writes: As some of you may know, OpenBSD team have started cleaning up OpenSSL code base. LibreSSL is primarily developed by the OpenBSD Project, and its first inclusion into an operating system will be in OpenBSD 5.6. In the wake of Heartbleed, OpenBSD group is creating a simpler, cleaner version of the dominant OpenSSL. Theo de Raadt, founder and leader of the OpenBSD and OpenSSH, tells ZDNet that the project has already removed 90,000 lines of C code and 150,000 lines of content. The project further promises Multi OS support once they have proper funding and the right portability team in place. Please consider donating to support LibreSSL via OpenBSD foundation.

Submission + - Siri says it hates African-Americans

Ricky Minton writes: Just playing around, I asked Siri if it hated African-Americans to which it replied, "I suppose it's possible." I tweeted a screenshot and included a link. Interesting it doesn't answer the question the same way about other races. For the record I am white and was testing it as a joke when it produced the result. The first time was a few weeks ago which I posted on my public facebook at www.facebook.com/rickyminton. The tweet I made today is at https://twitter.com/RickyMinton/status/384481406656585728

Submission + - GE Canada struggling to find PDP-11 programmers for its nuclear control systems 5

AmiMoJo writes: A representative from GE Canada has posted a job offer to the Vintage Computer forum for a PDP-11 assembly language programmer. Apparently the original job posting failed to turn up any qualified candidates to support the nuclear industry's existing robotic control systems, which they say they are committed to running until 2050. If they are having trouble finding anyone now one wonders how hard it will be in 37 years time.

Submission + - Researchers reverse-engineer Dropbox cracking heavily obfuscated Python app

rjmarvin writes: Two developers were able to successfully reverse-engineer Dropbox http://sdt.bz/64049 to intercept SSL traffic, bypass two-factor authentication and create open-source clients. They presented their paper, "Looking inside the (drop) box" at USENIX 2013, explaining step-by-step how they were able to succeed where others failed in reverse-engineering a heavily obfuscated application written in Python. They also claimed the generic techniques they used could be applied to reverse-engineer other Frozen python applications: OpenStack, NASA, and a host of Google apps, just to name a few...

Submission + - ICANN working group seeks to kill WHOIS (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: An Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) working group is seeking public input on a successor to the current WHOIS system used to retrieve domain name information. The Expert Working Group on gTLD Directory Services (EWG) has issued a report that recommends a radical change from WHOIS, replacing the current system with a centralised data store maintained by a third party that would be responsible for authorising "requestors" who want to obtain domain information.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How do you prove an IT manager incompetent?

An anonymous reader writes: I have been asked by a medium-sized business to help them come to grips with why their IT group is ineffective, loathed by all other departments, and runs at roughly twice the budget of what the CFO has deemed appropriate for the company's size and industry. After just a little scratching, it has become quite clear that the "head of IT" has no modern technological skills, and has been parroting what his subordinates have told him without question. (This has led to countless projects that are overly complex, don't function as needed, and are incredibly expensive.) How can one OBJECTIVELY illustrate that a person doesn't have the knowledge sufficient to run a department? The head of IT doesn't necessarily need to know how to write code, so a coding test serves no purpose, but should be able to run a project. Are there objective methods for assessing this ability?

Submission + - Practical HTTP Host header attacks

An anonymous reader writes: Trusting HTTP_HOST and its cousin SERVER_NAME has long been regarded as risky behavior. Nonetheless, plenty of popular web frameworks and applications still implicitly treat these user-supplied variables as entirely dependable. Practical HTTP Host header attacks introduces and illustrates two techniques that exploit such mistakes in Django, Joomla, Gallery and Varnish to poison caches and password reset emails alike. If only there was a canonical solution...

Submission + - Who is the best bleeding edge FOSS hosting provider?

An anonymous reader writes: For many of us our hosting providers are a way to hone our skills as well as run a business. Which provider out there gives the best bang for the buck for a FOSS developer? Virtually everybody provides Perl, PHP, Ruby, MySQL / MariaDB etc. but where can one get easy and cheap access to a stuff like NodeJS and Big Data?

Companies such as Pair Networks are great but not quite on the mark with any of their service offerings for somebody looking to test out real world scenarios with these technologies from a hosted stance. Obviously hosting from home is always an option but that has the penalty of administration, backup, DR planning, bigger security footprint etc. and for those of us whose time is balanced between making money and friends / family time that's not very appealing.

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