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Submission + - The Ham Radio Parity Act passes the house! (arrl.org) 1

bobbied writes: The House of representatives passed HR 1301 "The Ham Radio Parity Act" without objection on September 12, 2016. The measure calls on the FCC to amend its Part 97 rules “to prohibit the application to amateur stations of certain private land-use restrictions, and for other purposes.” This will allow for the reasonable accommodation of armature radio antennas in many places where they are currently prohibited by HOA's or private land use restrictions. This will be similar to the FCC's PRB-1 ruling in 1985 that did the same thing for Over The Air Television and Data service Antenna Structures. If this bill passes the senate, we will be one step closer to allowing armature radio operators, who provide emergency communications services, the right to erect reasonable antenna structures in places where they cannot do so now.

Submission + - Turn off location services? Go ahead, says Google, we'll still track you (theregister.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: Google, it seems, is very, very interested in knowing where you are at all times.

Users have been reporting battery life issues with the latest Android build, with many pointing the finger at Google Play – Google's app store – and its persistent, almost obsessive need to check where you are.

It's not clear why Google would insist on its app store having constant access to your location, but the company is very determined about it. Following reports earlier this year that the Google Play app was interfering with other apps' ability to use GPS, Google has updated the software and now makes it impossible to turn off location tracking.

The same is true of Google Maps. Although it makes far more sense for Maps to have access to your location, the latest build doesn't give you the option of turning it off. To do that, you have to turn off GPS on your phone altogether.

In effect, if you use either of Google's two most popular apps – which come pre-loaded with Google's flavor of Android – the company has permanent access to your location unless you turn off the location setting globally.

Submission + - Krebs warns of cyber criminal mind shift (cso.com.au)

River Tam writes: Renowned investigative journalist Brian Krebs of Krebs on Security warns that cyber criminals are changing tact in how they go about their work and seek gains for their exploits.

Submission + - LG Introduces The V20, The First Android Nougat Smartphone (venturebeat.com)

An anonymous reader writes: LG has unveiled its V20 flagship smartphone, the successor to the V10 that LG introduced last year, and the first smartphone to run Google's Android Nougat operating system out of the box. It's also the first phone to get In Apps, a new homescreen shortcut in Android that makes it easy to search through content on all installed apps. There's a customizable "second screen" at the top, the fingerprint scanner/power button on the rear, and a removable smooth aluminum alloy back cover that can allow you to remove the battery. There's no longer two front facing camera sensors, just one 5-megapixel wide-angle camera. There are however two rear-facing camera sensors similar to the G5. There's an 8-megapixel 135-degree wide-angle camera sensor and 16-megapixel 75-degree camera sensor. The new phone features a Snapdragon 820 processor, 4GB of RAM, 64GB of storage with support for up to 2TB of storage via microSD, a 3200 mAh battery, and a QHD display. It measures 159.7 x 78.1 x 7.6mm and weighs 174g. The USB-C adapter supports fast charging. The phone will be available in titan, silver, and pink, although pink won’t be coming to the U.S. market. LG has yet to disclose the price, the release date, or carrier availability for the phone.

Submission + - Almost half of Samsung Galaxy Note owners want to switch to Apple iPhone 7 (betanews.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Are Apple fanatics the ones mostly looking forward to the new iPhone? Not necessarily. Actually, according to a new study by Market Strategies, almost half of all Samsung Galaxy Note owners expressed interest in potentially switching to Apple's iPhone 7.

Submission + - Proposed 'social media ID, please' law met with anger (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: A plan by the U.S. government to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media IDs on key travel documents is being called by critics “ludicrous,” an “all-around bad idea,” “blatant overreach,” “desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness,” “preposterous,” “appalling,” and “un-American." That's just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from “visa waiver” countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes most of Europe, Singapore, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand. Travelers will be asked to provide their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, and whatever other social ID you can imagine to U.S. authorities. It’s technically an “optional” request, but since it’s the government asking, critics believe travelers will fear consequences if they ignore it. People who are traveling from a country where a visa is required, such as India or China, get a security vetting when they apply for a visa at a U.S. consulate, so this proposal doesn’t apply to them. In a little twist of irony, some critics said U.S. President Obama’s proposal for foreign travelers is so bad, it must have been hatched by Donald Trump.

Submission + - What NASA could teach Tesla about the limits of autopilot (scientificamerican.com)

DirkDaring writes: Tesla's autopilot along with Uber, Google and others has gotten seemingly weekly attention in the news for cars which drive by themselves. But another rather large organization has already been down this path for a very long time — NASA. They found that the more foolproof the automation’s performance becomes the harder it is for an on-the-loop supervisor (or driver) is to monitor it, which is the opposite of what Tesla is aiming their autopilot to be.

Submission + - The Epi-Pen price battle hits Congress (cnn.com) 2

Applehu Akbar writes: The recent exorbitant increase in the price of the Epi-Pen injector for epinephrine, a compound that has been generic for years, has now turned into civil war in the US Senate. One senator's daughter relies on Epi-Pen, while another senator's daughter is CEO of Mylan, the single company that is licensed to sell these injectors in the US.

On the worldwide market there is no monopoly on these devices. Manufacturers include Amedra Pharmaceuticals LLC, ALK Abello, Sanofi SA, and Lincoln Medical Ltd, Itelliject Inc, Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corp, Hospira Inc, Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd and Antares Pharma Inc. Is it finally time to allow Americans to go online and fill their prescriptions on the world market?

Submission + - SPAM: Seriously, don't drop your Galaxy Note 7

An anonymous reader writes: There’s nothing worse than the seemingly frozen moment after you’ve dropped your phone and have to gingerly pick it up off the floor, as you stare grimly at the face-down device and wonder whether or not your screen survived the landing this time.

That Schrödinger-esque moment is apparently going to be even more harrowing for Galaxy Note 7 users, with Samsung announcing that it will cost $270 to replace a shattered display. Apparently, huge 5.7-inch seamless curved Gorilla Glass 5 screens don’t come cheap.

5.7-INCH SEAMLESS CURVED GORILLA GLASS 5 SCREENS DON’T COME CHEAP

This kind of cost isn’t unheard of, with new screens for the similarly curved Galaxy S7 Edge also going for $270, but it’s a hefty price to pay, especially when compared with Apple (where the most expensive iPhone screen, for the 6S Plus, goes for $150) or HTC’s Uh Oh program which offers free broken screen repairs in the first year after buying.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Stolen NSA hacking tools reportedly on sale for $8,000 (bgr.com)

alir1272 writes: It’s been a rough week for the NSA, to say the least. Last week, a group of hackers collectively known as The Shadow Brokers allegedly stole and released a treasure trove of NSA hacking tools and exploits. What’s more, the group promised to release even more weapons from the NSA’s cyber arsenal for the right price.

While the initial leak was met with skepticism, researchers and security experts who examined the leak subsequently confirmed that the leaked exploits were very much real. “It definitely looks like a toolkit used by the NSA,” French computer researcher Matt Suiche said after taking a look at the code.

Submission + - Microsoft Buys AI-Powered Scheduling App Genee

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft has announced that it has completed its acquisition of artificial intelligence-based meeting scheduling app Genee for an undisclosed amount. The app, which was launched in beta last year, uses natural language processing tools and decision-making algorithms to allow users to schedule appointments without having to consult a calendar. Prior to the acquisition, Genee supported scheduling across Facebook, Twitter, Skype, email, and via SMS. From September 1, Genee will close its own service and will officially join Microsoft, supposedly the Office 365 team. Microsoft believes the addition will help it ‘further [its] ambition to bring intelligence into every digital experience.’

Submission + - Anti-Minimum Wage App launched by Employment Policies Institute

TigerPlish writes: In an example of why it is imperative to question the funding of every single Think Tank and "Resarch Organization," CNN reports the "Employment Policies Institute" — a conservative think tank funded in DC by one Richard Berman — which lobbies against minimum wage hikes for the Restaurant, Hotel, Alcohol and Tobacco industries — has launched an iOS app called Wage Engage. According to another source:

Wage Engage allows business owners to track minimum wage legislation in states relevant to them, and to offer their opinion about the impact of such increases. "You have an asymmetric battle. You have organized labor groups who can devote their entire days to advocating for a higher minimum wage. Then you have small business owners who didn't have the time, or didn't know about [the legislation]. The app lets restaurant owners tell their story in a personal way," says Michael Saltsman, the group's research director.

Please be aware that this "Employment Policies Institute" has nothing to do with the "Economic Policies Institute," which is a liberal think tank, which I'm sure also has its own agenda not aligned with helping The People.

Submission + - We Are All Intuitive Physicists, Scientists Say (gizmodo.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Human beings are very good at acting on the fly: swerving to avoid an obstacle in the road, ducking to keep from being hit, or reflexively catching a fly ball. We can do this because the brain is constantly running simulations of the physics involved as we scan our environment, according to a new series of brain imaging studies.

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