Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Comment OS Support? (Score 2) 56

I feel silly for asking this because I assume the answer is none, but does it support any OSes other than Windows? The 'deeply integrated' comments pretty much assure it doesn't, but I need to ask. I do recall when Skype was a useful tool worth paying for regardless of OS used but those days are long gone. SIGH.

Comment Re:Will create problems (Score 3, Insightful) 378

You might want to think about what you just said, or read the blurb of an article you are commenting on. It specifically states "Major Linux distributions" which are not what tend to support ancient, embedded, long life, or related non-consumer/non-traditional server workloads. In short there are tons, hundreds likely of distros that will cater to 32-bit and even 8/16-bit hardware because that is all that is needed for the job they do.

Go look at Linaro's work, it isn't technically a distro but is supports some pretty 'craptacular' hardware, at least by modern user perspectives. How long do you think your router can live with 'only' 32b SoCs? Do you think DDWRT will get a massive boost from 64b code? How about your dishwasher? There are distros that cater to all those markets and they are not moving to 64-bit only.

In short nothing will change for 99.(big number) of users, those that need 8/16/32b code will still have distros to do it. Anyone wanting to run those distros as a modern desktop or server, well, enjoy it but I am not a masochist so I won't be joining you. For every one else, carry on, you won't notice anything but better wares and cheaper devices.

Comment MAFIAA (Score 1) 316

When the RIAA started their jihad against technology and user rights, I said I would stop funding the industry until it settled. It settled, users lost, and I choose not to fund an industry that actively attacks my rights. I have enough CDs and if I buy any more, usually local or indy artists, I make sure they are not part of the MAFIAA. If they are, they don't get my money and I don't get their music but I also don't fund the evil ones.

So far it hasn't killed me, you can choose not to consume the shit that hurts you.

Comment Re: Stopped reading after... (Score 1) 106

Actually no, the ME is off as far as user facing features are concerned, but if it is fully off, good luck booting your PC. The MS is always on, and contrary to Intel's public stance, when you buy a SKU with it disabled/no BIOS for it loaded/fused off (depending on whom you talk to, I have gotten all three many times), it is still there, still functional, and still not under your control.

In short 'off' means the user facing and user accessible parts are no longer user accessible, not what most people still consider off. Intel refuses to talk about or publicly document what features are there and what are still active in each of these modes. I have asked them for this information and they said no. I have been digging on the ME for literally years, and have a fair idea of what it can do and can't do in both states.

And I am scared sh*tless by what I found.

Comment Re:USSA (Score 4, Informative) 284

This is done in the US with all printers, copiers, and just about anything else that can produce digital output. They are all watermarked with the printer info, time and date, plus likely other stuff encoded in (usually) yellow dots all over the page. The EFF had a decryption project for it, not sure how it ended up but the landing page is here:

https://www.eff.org/issues/pri...

Comment Re:Deduplication anyone (Score 1) 284

Dedupe is usually done at a block level, no a file level for this specific reason. Encryption, compression, and the like will cause headaches for the hypothetical one byte changes, but that is probably a solved problem by now. I have not kept up with the minutia of dedupe lately but for an outfit the size of Google, it would probably be worth it to decompress the files for dedupe. No clue if they do though, but it is not a huge technical challenge.

Comment New concept there... (Score 1) 284

Gee, almost like the government would have a legal and legitimate (search) warrant that Google et al would likely be happy to comply with. If the government uses it's powers correctly and within the letter of the law, not to mention the spirit, why shouldn't Google et al comply? It is only when they overstep and do BLATANTLY illegal things is when they tech companies push back.

My reading of this would be the government getting a search warrant for the provider in question, and a fully legal one at that. Legal warrants override privacy concerns, that is the point, no? If the laws won't allow a search of users, a warrant naming 'does 1-x' could do the same, at least from my limited legal knowledge.

                -Charlie

HP

HP To Jettison Up To 30,000 Jobs As Part of Spinoff 273

An anonymous reader writes: Hewlett-Packard says its upcoming spinoff of its technology divisions focused on software, consulting and data analysis will eliminate up to 30,000 jobs. The cuts announced Tuesday will be within the newly formed Hewlett Packard Enterprise, which is splitting from the Palo Alto, California company's personal computer and printing operation. "The new reductions amount to about 10 percent of the new company's workforce, and will save about $2.7 billion in annual operating costs." The split is scheduled to be completed by the end of next month. "The head of the group, Mike Nefkens, outlined a plan under which it is cutting jobs in what he called 'high-cost countries' and moving them to low-cost countries. He said that by the end of HP Enterprise’s fiscal year 2018, only 40 percent of the group’s work force will be located in high-cost countries."

Comment You mean like the one Qualcomm has now? (Score 1) 30

Wow, a research project that uses Ultrasound to scan fingerprints in 3D? This would be amazing if Qualcomm didn't have a near production version (Likely showing up in phones early next year around CES) that they were showing off at MWC months ago. I played with it here, it works, it does '3D', it scans beneath the surface, it is ultrasound based, etc etc. It also does other neat tricks that they aren't making public.

http://semiaccurate.com/2015/0...

So why is this 'new' one all the rage again?

              -Charlie

Comment Why Thunderbolt? (Score 3, Interesting) 123

Why would you want Thunderbolt again? It is a badly broken (IE doesn't actually do what is promised like channel bonding and a few other things that are sort of fixed in VERY recent silicon), costs far too much, forces the use of painfully expensive active cables, and only passes PCIe or video. This last bit is problematic because if you want any functionality on the other end of the cable, you need to add full controllers there too, think expensive and wasteful of power. In essence you are hot-plugging controllers with the cable, and while it works in theory....

TB is a badly broken spec from day one, it was meant as a control point for Intel to force the use of it's silicon in phones.mobile by replacing USB with something only it could provide. Needless to say the market saw through this and didn't adopt it in droves, sans the few that drank from the Intel money hose. The second the hose was shut off, so was the design wins.

The main reason that USB3 had such a slow start was because Intel was desperate to kill it to promote TB. Since Intel had control over the USB3 cert process, things went might slow for technical minutia that would easily pass by previous spec certs. Coincidence? Nope.

TB is a bad idea on technical, cost, lock-in, and many many other reasons, not working correctly ever being a key one there. Delivered silicon is a joke, there is and always will be one supplier, and progress is glacial. USB3.1 on the other hand beats it like a drum in every regard other than single channel throughput.

Why do I want to pay for this in my next laptop again?

                  -Charlie

Slashdot Top Deals

Never trust anyone who says money is no object.

Working...