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Submission + - Verizon Refuses To Brick the Samsung Note 7 (theverge.com)

caferace writes: According to this article at The Verge, Verizon has refused to push out the Samsung "No-Charge" update.

"...Today, Samsung announced an update to the Galaxy Note 7 that would stop the smartphone from charging, rendering it useless unless attached to a power charger. Verizon will not be taking part in this update because of the added risk this could pose to Galaxy Note 7 users that do not have another device to switch to. We will not push a software upgrade that will eliminate the ability for the Note 7 to work as a mobile device in the heart of the holiday travel season. We do not want to make it impossible to contact family, first responders or medical professionals in an emergency situation.."

Submission + - Red Hat Container Platform OpenShift Dedicated Launches On Google Cloud

An anonymous reader writes: Red Hat has announced the general availability of OpenShift Dedicated across Google Cloud Platform, bringing the open source container platform as a managed service to customers using Google’s cloud infrastructure. Google product manager Martin Buhr said that the move will help accelerate the adoption of Kubernetes, containers and cloud-native application patterns. Users will be able to access Google’s platform which is already optimised for container technologies. There will also be the added benefit of tapping into Google’s portfolio of products, including data analytics tools, machine learning, compute, network and storage services.

Submission + - Remarkable New Theory Says There's No Gravity (bigthink.com)

Jeff Socia writes: Gravity is something all of us are familiar with from our first childhood experiences. You drop something — it falls. And the way physicists have described gravity has also been pretty consistent — it’s considered one of the four main forces or “interactions” of nature and how it works has been described by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity all the way back in 1915.

But Professor Erik Verlinde, an expert in string theory from the University of Amsterdam and the Delta Institute of Theoretical Physics, thinks that gravity is not a fundamental force of nature because it's not always there. Instead it’s “emergent” — coming into existence from changes in microscopic bits of information in the structure of spacetime.

Submission + - 5-Year-Old Critical Linux Vulnerability Patched (threatpost.com)

msm1267 writes: A critical, local code-execution vulnerability in the Linux kernel was patched more than a week ago, continuing a run a serious security issues in the operating system, most of which have been hiding in the code for years.

Details on the vulnerability were published Tuesday by researcher Philip Pettersson, who said the vulnerable code was introduced in August 2011. A patch was pushed to the mainline Linux kernel Dec. 2, four days after it was privately disclosed. Pettersson has developed a proof-of-concept exploit specifically for Ubuntu distributions, but told Threatpost his attack could be ported to other distros with some changes.

The vulnerability is a race condition that was discovered in the af_packet implementation in the Linux kernel, and Pettersson said that a local attacker could exploit the bug to gain kernel code execution from unprivileged processes. He said the bug cannot be exploited remotely.

Submission + - Apache Zeppelin open-source analytics startup reveals new name, fresh funding (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: The team behind the Apache Zeppelin open-source notebook for big data analytics visualization has renamed itself ZEPL and announced $4.1M in Series A funding. ZEPL, which swears a certain professional football organization had nothing to do with it ditching its former name (NFLabs), is one of numerous companies smelling blood in the water around Tableau, the $3.5 billion business intelligence and analytics software vendor that has stumbled financially in recent quarters and seen its stock price plummet accordingly.

Submission + - Conexant and Amazon bring Alexa to Raspberry Pi with âAudioSmart 2-mic Deve (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: Much of Amazonâ(TM)s success with Echo and Alexa is thanks to third-party developers and hardware. Today, Conexant and Amazon announce the AudioSmart 2-mic Development Kit. This add-on for the Raspberry Pi should enable easier development of devices using Amazonâ(TM)s Alexa voice technology. This could ultimately lead to further growth and adoption of the Alexa voice assistant.

Submission + - Korora 25 'Gurgle' Fedora-based Linux distribution now available for download (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: If you want to use Fedora but do not want to spend time manually installing packages and repos, there is a solid alternative — Korora. Despite the funny-sounding name, it is a great way to experience Fedora in a more user-friendly way. Today, version 25, code-named 'Gurgle', becomes available for release.

Submission + - Bluetooth 5 is here (betanews.com) 1

BrianFagioli writes: Today, the Bluetooth Special Interest Group announces the official adoption of the previously-announced Bluetooth 5. In other words, it is officially the next major version of the technology, which will eventually be found in many consumer devices.

So, will you start to see Bluetooth 5 devices and dongles with faster speeds and longer range in stores tomorrow? Nope — sorry, folks. Consumers will have to wait until 2017. The Bluetooth SIG says devices should become available between February and June next year.

Submission + - Union of Concerned Scientists Pens open letter to President-Elect Trump

PvtVoid writes: The Union of Concerned Scientists has released an open letter to President-Elect Trump on science and public policy, outlining five items essential to sound science in the United States, stating that "... scientists should, without fear of reprisal or retaliation, have the freedom and responsibility to:

— conduct their work without political or private-sector interference.

— candidly communicate their findings to Congress, the public, and their scientific peers publish their work and participate meaningfully in the scientific community.

— disclose misrepresentation, censorship, and other abuses of science.

— ensure that scientific and technical information coming from the government is accurate."

The letter has been signed so far by more than 8,000 scientists.

Submission + - Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' BETA Ubuntu-based operating system now available for do (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: Feeling fatigued by Windows 10 and its constant updates and privacy concerns? Can't afford one of those beautiful new MacBook Pro laptops? Don't forget, Linux-based desktop operating systems are just a free download away, folks!

If you do decide to jump on the open source bandwagon, a good place to start is Linux Mint. Both the Mate and Cinnamon desktop environments should prove familiar to Windows converts, and since it is based on Ubuntu, there is a ton of compatible packages. Today, the first beta of Linux Mint 18.1 'Serena' becomes available for download.

Submission + - In Era Of Fake News, Should Scholars Be Trained to Fight Online Trolls? (edsurge.com)

jyosim writes: There's plenty of fake news and conspiracy theories on Reddit—the kind of material that appears to be eroding political discourse. Yet one professor at the University of California at Davis plans to send her graduate students into the popular online forum this week to teach them to bring more-accurate scientific information to the public. With the election of Donald Trump, who has Tweeted that he does not accept the scientific consensus around climate change, and an apparent increase in the influence of fake news, she adds, there is even greater pressure on scientists “to reach out to new audiences and talk to people about why we need scientists in our life and why we need evidence” to back up policy decisions.
Now more than 1,300 scientists moderate the r/Science subreddit to block out climate deniers and others making arguments not backed by facts.

  “There are people who actually strategize on how to disrupt legitimate news that is contrary to their agenda,” says Nathan Allen, moderator for r/Science. “They do things like badger people that they disagree with.”

One tactic has come to be known as sea lioning. That’s when opponents of a scientist’s work pepper them with seemingly polite but insincere questions demanding evidence for every point they make, as a way to throw them off point or exhaust them. “It’s culturally censoring people,” he adds. “The amount of energy it takes to respond to each point is just overwhelming. A lot of scientists just aren’t up for the fight.”

Submission + - Matt Taibbi: 'Washington Post' 'Blacklist' Story Is Shameful and Disgusting (rollingstone.com)

MyFirstNameIsPaul writes: From the article:

Most high school papers wouldn't touch sources like these. But in November 2016, both the president-elect of the United States and the Washington Post are equally at ease with this sort of sourcing.

Even worse, the Post apparently never contacted any of the outlets on the "list" before they ran their story. Yves Smith at Naked Capitalism says she was never contacted. Chris Hedges of Truthdig, who was part of a group that won the Pulitzer Prize for The New York Times once upon a time, said the same. "We were named," he tells me. "I was not contacted."

Hedges says the Post piece was an "updated form of Red-Baiting."

"This attack signals an open war on the independent press," he says. "Those who do not spew the official line will be increasingly demonized in corporate echo chambers such as the Post or CNN as useful idiots or fifth columnists."


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