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Submission + - Text Analyser Reveals Emotional 'Temperature' of Novels and Fairy Tales (medium.com)

KentuckyFC writes: Stories are a powerful channel for communicating emotions. But while they have been studied in detail by generations of critics, there is little in the way of objective tools for analysing and comparing their emotional content. That looks set to change thanks to one data mining researcher who has applied the process of sentiment analysis to novels and fairy tales that have been digitised on Project Gutenburg and the Google Books Corpus. The results show the density of emotions in different parts of a story and how the emotional 'temperature' changes throughout the tale. For example, this guy has used the technique to compare the emotional content of the entire collection of the Brothers Grimm fairy tales to reveal that the darkest story is a tale called Gambling Hansel ; clearly a lesson to us all.

Submission + - SPAM: Chrome Browser Now Directly Opens Microsoft Office Documents

An anonymous reader writes: Chrome browser (Windows and Mac versions) now has features built in to allow users to open Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint files directly in the browser. These features, including the sandboxing for security reasons, are taken directly from Chrome OS.
Link to Original Source

Submission + - First Bitcoin ATM arrives in San Diego (10news.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The first ever Bitcoin ATM has arrived in San Diego. 10News reports that BitcoinATM CEO Evan Rose, a San Diegan, said, "Basically allowing people to buy Bitcoins with cash, cash Bitcoins out right on the spot."

Submission + - NRC Report Links Climate Change to National Security (nytimes.com)

WOOFYGOOFY writes: The NY Times and Voice Of America amongst others are reporting on a study by the U.S. National Research Council which was released Friday linking global climate change to national security.

http://www.voanews.com/content/climate-change-security/1543127.html

http://chronicle.com/article/US-Urged-to-Step-Up-Research /135724/

The report which was developed at the request of the C.I.A. characterizes the threats posed by climate change
as "similar to and in many cases greater than those posed by terrorist attacks."

http://www.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=14682&page=1

If the effect of unaddressed climate change is the functional equivalent of terrorist attacks on the nation, does the Executive Branch, as a matter of national security, have a duty and a right to begin to act unilaterally against climate change irrespective of what Congress currently believes?

Patents

Submission + - Samsung: Android's Multitouch Not as Good as Apple's (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: "Hoping to avoid a sales ban in the Netherlands, Samsung has said that Android's multitouch software doesn't work as well as Apple's. Samsung lawyer Bas Berghuis van Woortman said that while Apple's technology is a 'very nice invention,' the Android system is harder for developers to use. Arguing the bizarre counterpoint, Apple's lawyer Theo Blomme told judge Peter Blok, that the Android multitouch isn't inferior and does so infringe on Apple's patent: 'They suggest that they have a lesser solution, but that is simply not true,' said Blomme."
The Military

Submission + - DARPA's Robo-Cheetah Is Now Faster Than Usain Bolt (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "The Boston Dynamics Cheetah just clocked a 28.3 miles per hour sprint on a treadmill, and it’s heading outdoors soon. At that speed, it could edge out the world’s fastest man, Usain Bolt in a dead sprint. (Bolt peaked at 27.78 miles per hour in his world record setting 100 meter dash back in 2009.) "To be fair, keep in mind that the Cheetah robot runs on a treadmill without wind drag and has an off-board power supply that it does not carry,” admitted Boston Dynamics in a press release. “So Bolt is still the superior athlete.” Nevertheless, the team hopes to drop these implements and have a freestanding speed bot by early next year. They’re calling that model the WildCat."
China

Submission + - China arrested a CIA spy (latimes.com)

Taco Cowboy writes: A 38-year-old Chinese national, who was a secretary to Qiu Jin, the deputy minister of state security, is alleged to have been recruited and trained by the CIA and was arrested by the Chinese authority sometime this year

It was reported that the man was approached by the CIA while he was a student studying in the USA

To "cement" the relationship, the CIA arranged a classic "honey trap", where the guy was photographed with a woman in a compromising setting in a Hong Kong apartment. And with that, the guy is coerced into spying for the CIA

Wireless Networking

Submission + - Your Neighbor's WiFi Wants You to Vote for Romney

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Megan Garber writes that wireless routers have become the lawn signs of the digital age particularly in large apartment buildings, where almost every unit has a unique wifi network that will be detected in turn by all the other unique wifi networks, SSIDs can be a cheeky, geeky way to broadcast messages to your immediate neighbors. Most of us keep it simple with "275_Elm_Street," "Apt23," or "my_network" but some get more creative with names like: "Apt112IHaveYourMail," "PrettyFlyForAWiFi," or "WeCanHearYouHavingSex" — a great way to freak out your annoying neighbors without hiding in their bushes or peeping in their windows late at night. Now the team at OpenSignalMaps, which maintains a database of geolocated wifi access points, analyzed the data they've collected about wireless routers to see whether wifi names are "being used to fly political colors" and have found, globally, 1,140 results for "Obama" and an additional six for "Romney" — an indication not necessarily of Romney's popularity relative to the president's, but of the attention that four years as president can confer. "There's something uniquely contemporary and incredibly old-school about that kind of broadcasting: It's messaging meant only for your immediate neighbors," writes Garber "It's both intimate and isolating, both invasive and impersonal, both omnipresent and invisible, both passive and aggressive." Which makes them a good metaphor for political discourse as it looks in the US today with its particular mix of intimacy and impersonality. "The politicized network names are like lawn signs for people who don't have lawns.""
Idle

Submission + - Toddler's iPad Tantrum Gets Him Kicked Off Plane 3

theodp writes: A three-year-old boy on an Alaska Airlines flight to St. Martin Island from Seattle threw such severe conniptions after his iPad was taken away before takeoff that he and his family were removed from the plane. Alaska Airlines said this was a judgment call on the captain's part — the boy reportedly wouldn't sit upright and wouldn't keep his seatbelt on. No word if the little tyke tweeted his disgust with how the airline deprived him of his iPad rights, a la Alec Baldwin.
Privacy

Submission + - SK Communications Facing $31 Billion Payout for Massive Privacy Breach 1

An anonymous reader writes: Taiwanese news portal 'informationsecurity.com.tw' is reporting that SK Communications, a South Korean telecommunications provider and owner of the Nate and Cyworld social networking sites, may be facing a $31 billion USD damages payout for its failure to prevent a massive hack that compromised the personal details of over 35 million users.

In July 2011 sophisticated hackers, later linked to the RSA breach and a number of other high profile intrusions, used a compromised third-party update server and trojaned software update to infiltrate the SK Communications computer network. The hackers maintained their access for multiple weeks, ultimately siphoning off sensitive user data including usernames, passwords, addresses, phone numbers, and Resident Registration Numbers (a Social Security number equivalent).

Despite the sophistication of the attack, a judge recently determined that SK Communications was at fault for failing to adequately protect the user data, awarding 1 million won (approximately $885 USD) in damages to just one affected user. If subsequent class action is similarly successful SK Communications could be facing a total payout of $31 billion USD.

Given that the same hackers successfully targeted security firm RSA (albeit with a simplistic socially engineered email) is it reasonable to expect that SK Communications could have defended itself against such a well planned and executed attack?
Hardware

Submission + - Former MakerBot COO creates the world's first $500 3D printer (geek.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: At first glance Sam Cervantes and his latest invention may seem questionable, but after spending some time talking with him I’m sure what he’s showing off is legit. Cervantes and his team are working on the first $500 3D printer, a device known as the Solidoodle. At the risk of sounding cliche, what you’re witnessing in the video is truly game-changing; the Solidoodle is a significant step towards making 3D printing accessible to the average consumer.
Space

Submission + - Huge Spirals Found on Mars—Evidence of New Lava Type? (nationalgeographic.com)

fishmike writes: "Hundreds of large spirals have been discovered on Mars, and scientists think the coiled features are evidence of a type of lava flow never before seen on the red planet.

If so, the spirals would suggest that volcanoes—not ice floes, as other experts believe—shaped an unusual area near the red planet's equator."

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