Please create an account to participate in the Slashdot moderation system

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Comment Re:Numbers (Score 1) 426

I have been thinking along similar lines, not nearly so clearly as OP. As to where, declare it by fiat based on population. A new person enters society - a new potential stream of wealth is added to the national budget. Death would need to be a factor in the budget but not sure how under this idea - something like fiat currency is devalued by the UBI value (not their earned addition though) of the person, but spread out over a generation of time.

Comment administrative churn (Score 1) 530

While I agree with his position, the method is (IMHO) wrong. What Elon is requesting is that the government take away from fossil fuel subsidies by a post-facto tax on awarded monies. The inefficiencies of administrative churn will impose a longer time to balancing energy subsidies. A more straight forward solution would be to simply mandate that the sum of all non-renewable energy subsides on a per joule basis be strictly less than the aggregate renewable energy subsidies with a monotonically decreasing non-renewable to renewable subsidy ratio over time. Let the administration have control of the ratio co-factor in order to satisfy the pork belly constituencies.

Of course nothing like this will ever happen as governments do not like reasonable solutions and will always look to laws that only create an appearance of solving the problem so that future

Submission + - Elon Musk confirms Tesla Model 3 will have Ludicrous Mode (bgr.com)

anderzole writes: During Tesla’s Model 3 unveiling this past March, Elon Musk confidently boasted, “At Tesla, we don’t make slow cars.” And true to form, Tesla over the past few years has demonstrated a near obsession with speed. First, Tesla introduced Insane Mode, a feature which lets a dual-motor Model S P85D go from 0-60 in just 3.2 seconds. Pushing the envelope even further, Tesla last year introduced a Ludicrous Mode which lets a Model S go from 0 to 60 in just 2.8 seconds.

Even Tesla’s crossover SUV – the Model X – is no slouch in the speed department as it can go from 0 to 60 in just 3.2 seconds when in Ludicrous Mode.

Now if you’re one of the 400,000 Model 3 subscribers and are wondering if the Model 3 will have an upgrade option for speed enthusiasts, Elon Musk answered your prayers over the weekend. Responding to a question on Twitter, Musk confirmed for the first time that the Model 3 will, in fact, come with a Ludicrous Mode option.

During the Model 3 unveiling, Musk said that the entry level Model 3 will be able to go fro 0-60 in less than seconds. On a tricked out Model 3 with Ludicrous Mode enabled, some rumors have claimed that Tesla’s EV for the masses will be able to go from 0-60 in under 4 seconds.

Submission + - Computational Photography Shows Hi-Res Mars And "lost" Beagle 2 (i-programmer.info)

mikejuk writes: Computational photographic is amazing, but sometimes you have to wonder if it is actually useful and not just amusing. Proving that it is, researchers have found a way to extract high-resolution images from multiple low-resolution images of the Martian surface. These are good enough almost to see the lost Beagle 2 lander clearly.
The technique was applied to photos from the HiRISE camera on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter 300km above the red planet's surface. These low-resolution images provide a view of objects as small as 25cm. but by combining eight repeat passes over Gusev Crater, where the Spirit rover left tracks, the resolution could be increased to 5cm. The processing time was in the order of 24 hours for a 2048x1024 tile. Because of the time it takes a full HiRISE image hasn't been processed as yet. This should become possible when the program extended to make use of a GPU.
The method was applied to the proposed crash site of the Beagle 2 lander. In case you have forgotten, the Beagle 2 was a novel lander designed to test for life which should have transmitted a signal on Christmas day 2003, but was never heard from. A possible crash site was spotted twelve years later as a bright dot in a HiRISE image. The constructed higher resolution version starts to show the characteristic shape of the space craft.

Submission + - The government wants your fingerprint to unlock your phone (latimes.com)

schwit1 writes: As the world watched the FBI spar with Apple this winter in an attempt to hack into a San Bernardino shooter's iPhone, federal officials were quietly waging a different encryption battle in a Los Angeles courtroom.

There, authorities obtained a search warrant compelling the girlfriend of an alleged Armenian gang member to press her finger against an iPhone that had been seized from a Glendale home. The phone contained Apple's fingerprint identification system for unlocking, and prosecutors wanted access to the data inside it.

It marked a rare time that prosecutors have demanded a person provide a fingerprint to open a computer, but experts expect such cases to become more common as cracking digital security becomes a larger part of law enforcement work.

The Glendale case and others like it are forcing courts to address a basic question: How far can the government go to obtain biometric markers such as fingerprints and hair?

Comment This is not security (Score 4, Insightful) 144

In the majority of cases if you are interacting with the boot process then you have physical access to the machine. So unless GRUB is managing disk encryption you have access regardless of the password in GRUB. This is security theater, not real security and breaking it is not accomplishing anything significant.

Next Story.

Comment As simple as possible... (Score 1) 160

Or just maybe - research tends to be focused on highly complex topics that require extremely specific definitions afforded only by obscure terminology. Often the ability express these concepts in a manner graspable by an average level vocabulary is difficult - bordering on impossible. Not to mention that the time required to come up with an adequately simple representation is often not given due to the pressure to publish the next idea.

"Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler" - A. Einstein
"I would have written a shorter letter, but I did not have the time" B. Pascal

Submission + - Rice Professor Predicts Humans Out Of Work In 30 Years (singularityhub.com) 1

kkleiner writes: Rice University professor Moshe Vardi has been evaluating technological progress in computer science and artificial intelligence and has recently concluded that robots will replace most, if not all, human labor by 2045, putting millions out of work. The issue is whether AI enables humans to do more or less. But perhaps the real question about technological unemployment of labor isn't "How will people do nothing?" but "What kind of work will they do instead?"

Submission + - NASA mission to find exoplanets grinds to a halt (nature.com)

ananyo writes: Just over four years after it was launched into orbit, NASA's Kepler space telescope has broken down. On 12 May, after tilting in an unexpected direction, it entered a protective safe mode and stopped collecting data. Efforts to get the spacecraft going again failed when a wheel critical for pointing the telescope refused to spin.
NASA isn't ready to give up on the mission, which launched in 2009 and was extended last year to 2016. Running on thrusters, Kepler has the fuel to stay in orbit for months or perhaps years as engineers try to fix the problem from 40 million miles away. But with two of its four reaction wheels now out of commission — the first stopped working last July — the spacecraft's search for planets around other stars is clearly in trouble.

Slashdot Top Deals

God help those who do not help themselves. -- Wilson Mizner

Working...