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Medicine

Submission + - New anatomical structure discovered and described in human spine (utexas.edu)

mkortsha writes: Researchers at The University of California, San Francisco have discovered a new anatomical feature of the human spine. Using micro-CT imaging technology the scientists were able to clearly image the presence of a secondary endplate layer in some spinal specimens. The double layer appears to provide additional support to the spinal endplate, which may help protect the vertebral body in case of endplate damage.
Science

Submission + - Humans smell in Stereo (nature.com)

Xemu writes: "Humans can locate an odour source thanks to a feature called stereo sniffing, says researchers in an article just published in Nature Communications. To further enhance odorant location capabilties, mammals combine serial sampling with bilateral nasal cues. Much like your average teenager in a dark basement would locate that smelly sock. Blocking one nostril makes it harder."
Android

Submission + - OUYA Android Game Console Available In June (wsj.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The WSJ reports that OUYA, the $100 Android-based gaming console, will reach retail availability in June. The makers have partnered with Amazon, Best Buy, GameStop, and Target for distributing the devices. The console will come with a controller (which has the traditional thumbsticks, D-pad, buttons, and triggers as well as a built-in touchpad), and additional controllers will be sold for $50. OUYA CDEo Julie Uhrman said, 'For the last year or two years all we’ve been hearing is that the consoles are dead. The reason is there isn’t new, innovative intellectual property. It’s expensive to develop on it. You’re seeing a major shift of games being developed on the television. Our viewpoint has always been that console gaming isn’t dead, the way we think about it hasn’t changed. We’re bringing the best screen and the best device to interact with that by creating a platform that is open.' There was a recent 'Game Jam' to create game prototypes for the console; you can browse the 166 entries.
Google

Submission + - Google Redesigns Image Search - Raises Copyright and SEO Concerns (blogspot.ca)

An anonymous reader writes: Google has recently announced changes to its image search. The search provides larger views of the images with direct links to the full-sized source image. Although this new layout is being praised by some for its beauty and intuitiveness, it has raised concerns amongst image copyright holders and webmasters. Large images can now easily be seen and downloaded directly from the Google image search results without sending visitors to the hosting website. Webmasters have expressed concerns about a decrease in traffic and an increase in bandwidth usage since this change was rolled out. Some have set up a petition requesting Google remove the direct links to the images.
GNU is Not Unix

Submission + - Fedora 18 for ARM-based Devices Released Officially (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: Fedora 18 "Spherical Cow" has been officially released for ARM-based devices within a month of being released for x86 and x64 hardware. The newly released ARM version of the operating system has been made available in the form of pre-built images for the hardware platforms such as Versatile Express (QEMU), Trimslice (Tegra), Pandaboard (OMAP4), GuruPlug (Kirkwood), and Beagleboard (OMAP3). Announcing the release Fedora noted that these pre-built images can be written directly to any type of storage media used today such as SD card, USB or SATA drive and can booted right away without the need for any extra configuration.
Medicine

Submission + - Cells From Fetus End Up In Mothers' Brains (singularityhub.com)

kkleiner writes: "It has been known for some time that, during pregnancy, fetal cells end up circulating within the mother’s bloodstream. A relatively new discovery, however, is that these fetal cells don’t just remain in the blood stream they travel to organs such as the heart or brain and stay there. What’s fascinating about these fetal cells is that they resemble pluripotent stem cells – they have the ability to become heart or brain cells. What this means functionally is still uncertain. But the potential for these so-called fetal microchimeric cells to incorporate and actually help repair maternal tissue is a new and exciting area of medical research."
Twitter

Submission + - The World's Tweets Light Up the Globe in Stunning Live Visualization (wired.com)

anavictoriasaavedra writes: It’s simple, but lovely. Web designer Franck Ernewein‘s real-time Twitter visualization, Tweetping, drops a bright pixel at the location of every tweet in the world, starting as soon as you open the page. The result is a constantly changing image that grows to look like a nighttime satellite shot, bright spots swarming over the most developed areas.
Your Rights Online

Submission + - PG County MD considers copyright ownership of student and teacher works (washingtonpost.com) 1

schwit1 writes: A proposal by the Prince George’s County Board of Education to copyright work created by staff and students for school could mean that a picture drawn by a first-grader, a lesson plan developed by a teacher or an app created by a teen would belong to the school system, not the individual.

It’s not unusual for a company to hold the rights to an employee’s work, copyright policy experts said. But the Prince George’s policy goes a step further by saying that work created for the school by employees during their own time and using their own materials is the school system’s property.

Space

Submission + - Multiple minds smooths your ship's path (newscientist.com)

FatLittleMonkey writes: My mind to your mind... my thoughts to your thoughts... Researchers at the University of Essex have shown that combining the output from two non-invasive "brain-computer interfaces", computer-interpreted EEG signals, led to a much clearer signal of the subjects' intention than the output from a single subject. To test this idea, they had two subjects try to steer a simulated space-ship at a target planet, by thinking of one of eight possible directions. While a single user could achieve 67% accuracy, this jumped to 90% when two minds were combined. Researchers believe the technique also compensates for individual lapses in attention, and thus may have applications in real-world space missions.
Hardware

Submission + - Magnetic transistor could cut power consumption and make chips reprogrammable (nature.com)

ananyo writes: "Transistors, the simple switches at the heart of all modern electronics, generally use a tiny voltage to toggle between ‘on’ and ‘off’. The voltage approach is highly reliable and easy to miniaturize, but has its disadvantages. First, keeping the voltage on requires power, which drives up the energy consumption of the microchip. Second, transistors must be hard-wired into the chips and can’t be reconfigured, which means computers need dedicated circuitry for all their functions.
Now, researchers have made a type of transistor that can be switched with magnetism. The device could cut the power consumption of computers, cell phones and other electronics — and allow chips themselves to be 'reprogrammed'' (abstract)."

Submission + - In Calculator Arms Race, Casio Fires Back: Color Touchscreen ClassPad (cemetech.net) 2

KermMartian writes: "In what seems to be an accelerating arms race for graphing calculator supremacy between Texas Instruments and Casio, the underdog Casio has fired a return salvo to the recently-announced TI-84 Plus C Silver Edition. The new ClassPad fx-CP400 has a massive color touchscreen and a Matlab-esque CAS. Though not accepted on the SAT/ACT, will such a powerful device gain a strong following among engineers and professionals?"

Submission + - Color-Screen TI-84 Plus Calculator Leaked (cemetech.net) 1

KermMartian writes: "It has been nearly two decades since Texas Instruments released the TI-82 graphing calculator, and as the TI-83, TI-83+, and TI-84+ were created in the intervening years, these 6MHz machines have only become more absurdly retro, complete with 96x64-pixel monochome LCDs and a $120 price tag. However, a student member of a popular graphing calculator hacking site has leaked pictures and details about a new color-screen TI-84+ calculator, verified to be coming soon from Texas Instruments. With the lukewarm reception to TI's Nspire line, it seems to be an attempt to compete with Casio's popular color-screen Prizm calculator. Imagine the graphs (and games!) on this new 320x240 canvas."
Science

Submission + - Study: You Can Learn New Things in Your Sleep (medicaldaily.com)

bbianca127 writes: Researchers studied classical conditioning in 55 study participants while sleeping or awake. According to the article, "Classical conditioning teaches a person or animal to associate one stimulus with another." The researchers paired tones with scents; when they played a tone, they would let out a particular scent while the participants were sleeping. They found that the participants would make the association between the tones and scents even while awake.

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