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Comment Re:The elephants in the room (Score 1) 244

We would see the corruption on databases that weren't being shut down, just one day it was fine, the next it was corrupt.

Online archive requires *either* that users be proactive in doing so, or that as administrators you're just (by policy) ripping messages out of their mailbox and putting them somewhere else on an automated basis. The former is pretty difficult to convince folks to do, the latter would not be acceptable at pretty much any place I've ever worked (folks want to organize their mail "their way so they can find things easily") and automated tools changing that goes against how they use mail.

Comment Re:The elephants in the room (Score 1) 244

- Individual Mailboxes getting "too big" (FSVO "big") and Exchange performing badly with them
- Frequent corruption of the mailstore requiring repairs and usually resulting in the loss of n>0 messages

Those are two complaints I remember being most common from folks who've dealt with it.

Comment Re:Easy Fix (Score 4, Insightful) 353

It would, in fact, be a selling point.

We care so much about you that we're not going to cave in like our competitors whose phones you can buy.

Where it would become interesting is in how the carrier-stores (Verizon Store, Sprint Store, etc.) would choose to deal with it, since Apple would be unwilling to ship them product to sell in NY.

Comment Re:Big deal (Score 4, Informative) 140

Having been through a similar rodeo, it's just a matter of showing a different set of paperwork that shows "when orgA dissolved, all of its assets were transferred legally to orgB", at which point any representative of orgB has the same power over it because it's a transferred asset which just hasn't had some paperwork corrected at the registrar.

Comment I'm OK With This (Score 1) 555

I agree with the other commenter with regards to "expect pushback from the agencies saddled with it."

Absolutely.

But the only chance gun-owners are going to even come close to accepting this is if the kinks are so worked out of them that the people most at risk of going mano a mano with a perp who wants to take their gun are trusting their lives to a given tech. And that means agencies working those kinks out in the field and proving the validity of the tech under real world conditions.

Comment Re:Sue em. (Score 3, Insightful) 954

The question is was the statement credible. Ie. Was it.

{solemn voice}"Yes. I have a bomb."

Or was it:

{Laughter}"Yeah, dude. I totalllly have a bomb in there. Of course I do."

Considering that the TSA considers the second to be a reason to deny you air travel, even though no court in the world would consider it a credible admission of such, we have no way of knowing which of these two scenarios played out in the principal's office.

Comment Re:Use A Whitelist (Score 3, Insightful) 108

I'm an adult, and I rarely answer any number I don't recognize immediately. If it's important, they'll leave a voicemail and I'll call them right back at the number they provide.

But since 99.99% of the calls I receive from un-recognized numbers are horseshit robo-calls, no, I agree with commenter above: Why on earth would someone answer the phone any more?

Comment Re:All Robocalls should be illegal (Score 5, Insightful) 108

But they didn't "contact them from an offshore number". They contacted them from a number in Ohio. It says so right there on their Caller ID.

That's the trick, right? If the call-center is off-shore, the Caller ID can say whatever they want it to say, because they're not bound by the CNID spoofing rules.

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