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Submission + - NVidia announces fastest ever GPU yet (parityportal.com)

hypnosec writes: NVidia has announced a new Kepler based Quadro K6000 GPU which it claims is the fastest and most capable GPU ever built till date. The Quadro K6000 replaces the Quadro 6000 and the specifications of the new GPU are just too good to be true. The K6000 packs 12GB of blazing-fast DDR5 graphics memory along with a whopping 2,880 streaming multiprocessor cores, ultra-low latency video I/O and support for large-scale visualizations. With all this GPU has the ability to drive four simultaneous 4K displays.
Facebook

Submission + - British researchers "gamify" cancer cure search (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: "Scientists from Cancer Research UK are working with Amazon, Facebook and Google to design and develop a mobile game aimed at speeding up the search for new cancer drugs. The first step is for 40 computer programmers, gamers, graphic designers and other specialists to take part in a weekend "GameJam" to turn the charity's raw genetic data into a game format, with a working title of GeneRun.

"We're making great progress in understanding the genetic reasons cancer develops. But the clues to why some drugs will work and some won't are held in data that needs to be analysed by the human eye — and this could take years," said Carlos Caldas at Cancer Research UK's Cambridge Institute. "By harnessing the collective power of citizen scientists we'll accelerate the discovery of new ways to diagnose and treat cancer much more precisely.""

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Development Overview for Executive Stakeholders

An anonymous reader writes: I work for a midsize content management solutions provider and have been tasked with providing more visibility into the dev team's progress as we prepare to launch some new products. We track Engineering progress in Jira, but obviously there's a lot of low-level detail that the execs don't get (nor care about). We need a way to have all our dev progress updated into a high level overview focused solely on features and time release dates. Currently, I have to prepare excel spreadsheets that provide this insight. It's both inefficient and a time waster. Any suggestions?
Robotics

Submission + - BigDog grabs, lifts, and throws cinder blocks with its new arm (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: Boston Dynamics' BigDog may have already been replaced by the beefier LS3, but that doesn't mean it's totally obsolete. Today the company unveiled a version of the quadruped equipped with an arm where a head (or tail) would go. As can be seen in a slightly disquieting video, it's powerful enough to lift and toss a heavy cinder block. Key to this work, funded by the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, is that BigDog uses the dynamic forces of its whole body to help it throw the cinder block. It begins by taking several steps to the side before quickly accelerating as it swings its arm, temporarily launching itself into the air in the process. This approach is similar to the way an athlete winds up before throwing a discus, for example, and greatly enhances the robot's throwing power. Since few robots are as capable as BigDog when it comes to balance, it's an excellent platform to test these sorts of strenuous actions.
Space

Submission + - NASA discovers third radiation belt circling earth (india.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Washington: NASA's Van Allen Probes, which was launched on Aug. 30, 2012, to study two giant belts of radiation that surround Earth, has shown scientists something that would require rewriting textbooks. Just three days after its launch, the scientists on the mission made a decision to turn on the Relativistic Electron Proton Telescope (REPT) early in order that its observations would overlap with another mission called SAMPEX (Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer), that was soon going to de-orbit and re-enter Earth's atmosphere... Then something happened no one had ever seen before: the particles settled into a new configuration, showing an extra, third belt extending out into space.

ZU

Microsoft

Submission + - Emulator lets Windows RT run x86 apps (pcpro.co.uk)

nk497 writes: "A developer has created a way to emulate x86 software on Windows RT, Microsoft's tablet OS designed for machines powered by ARM processors. According to a post by the converter's creator on the XDA Developers forum, the tool "emulates x86 instructions and passes Windows API calls to the WinRT kernel with necessary modifications". The tool is only in beta and is of course completely unofficial, requiring the device to be unlocked to allow side-loaded apps, but offers a glimpse into how ARM-based devices such as Microsoft's Surface RT could gain additional software tools originally designed for the desktop."
Government

Submission + - Homeland Security Stole Michael Arrington's Boat (uncrunched.com) 2

An anonymous reader writes: Michael Arrington, founder of TechCrunch, lives near Seattle and bought a boat there. He ordered it from a company based near him, but across the border in Canada. Yesterday, the company tried to deliver it to him, and it had to clear customs. An agent for the Department of Homeland Security asked him to sign a form. The form contained information about the bought, including its cost. The price was correct, but it was in U.S. dollars rather than Canadian dollars. Since the form contained legal warnings about making sure everything on it is true and accurate, Arrington suggested to the agent that they correct the error. She responded by seizing the boat. 'As in, demanded that we get off the boat, demanded the keys and took physical control of it. What struck me the most about the situation is how excited she got about seizing the boat. Like she was just itching for something like this to happen. This was a very happy day for her. ... A person with a gun and a government badge asked me to swear in writing that a lie was true today. And when I didn’t do what she wanted she simply took my boat and asked me to leave.'
EU

Submission + - EU to spend 1 billion euro on graphene and brain research

jandersen writes: The EU is going to spend 100 million per year over the next 10 years to boost research and interdisciplinary cooperation by launching two flagship projects in March:

- The Human Brain Project: Aims "to develop a large-scale ICT infrastructure for the specific purpose of understanding the brain and its diseases, and of translating this knowledge into new computing technology." Basically, they want to build a working computer model of a human brain. (http://www.humanbrainproject.eu/in_brief.html)

- The Graphene Flagship: Aims "to take graphene and related layered materials from academic laboratories to society, revolutionize multiple industries and create economic growth and new jobs in Europe." (http://www.graphene-flagship.eu/GF/index.php)

How cool is that? For more info, see http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/ict/programme/fet/flagship/home_en.html — but be warned: this is EU, and understanding the whole setup is fiendishly complicated.
Government

Submission + - Important companies absent from new cybersecurity partnership with government (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Interesting to see both Intel and AMD collaborate on security, but where are companies like HP, Cisco, Microsoft, Google, etc.?

"Five U.S. technology companies, including top weapons maker Lockheed Martin Corp and chip maker Intel, plan to team up to tackle 'grand challenges' in cyberspace amid growing concerns about computer security. The non-profit research consortium, to be known as the Cyber Security Research Alliance (CSRA), will also include Advanced Micro Devices, Honeywell International and EMC Corp's RSA Security division as founding members. The consortium will coordinate industry research and work closely with government to develop 'break-through technologies' to improve cybersecurity, said its president Lee Holcomb, a senior executive at Lockheed's information systems and global solutions division.

Science

Submission + - The bleeding edge of self-healing skin-like materials (bbc.com)

concealment writes: "Nancy Sottos, an engineer at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been developing a novel approach that borrows from human physiology. Inspired by human skin, Sottos creates plastics that “bleed” when cut and can heal themselves over and over again. Her work is paving the way for new materials that can respond and react to all sorts of environmental stresses. At a mundane level, this could cut down on costly maintenance and inspections, but perhaps more importantly it could also help prevent catastrophic – and potentially deadly — failures.

When made-made structures fail, they often do so spectacularly—with, say, a bridge collapsing under the weight of rush hour traffic. But such dramatic breakdowns often have much smaller, humbler beginnings. “When a material fails, oftentimes it’s not a big catastrophic event that starts it,” Sottos says. “In most materials, a damage event starts at a very small crack.” The crack grows slowly, unnoticed, untilbam! Bridge collapse. “The goal of a self healing material is to try to prevent that,” Sottos says, “to keep those small cracks from growing.”"

Submission + - Anonymous' WikiLeaks like Project Tyler to Launch in December (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: A hacker, who claims to be a member of the hacking collective Anonymous, has revealed that the hacktivist group is working on a Wikileaks like service dubbed Tyler and that it will be launched on December 21. Anonymous’ member revealed that the service will be decentralized and will be based on peer-to-peer service unlike Wikileaks thus making Tyler rather immune to closure and raids. The site will serve as a haven for whistle blowers where they can publish classified documents and information. The hacker said in an emailed interview “Tyler will be P2P encrypted software, in which every function of a disclosure platform will be handled and shared by everyone who downloads and deploys the software.”
The Military

Submission + - X-51a test results released (gizmag.com)

cylonlover writes: The United States Air Force (USAF) has released the results of last August’s third test of the X-51a Waverider, which resulted in the crash of the unmanned scramjet demonstrator. At a press teleconference featuring the Program Manager for Air Force Research Laboratory, Charles Brink, it was confirmed that a malfunctioning fin was the cause of the crash. However, engineers are confident of correcting the fault in time for the fourth test flight scheduled for (Northern Hemisphere) late spring or early summer of next year.
Medicine

Submission + - Teenager Loses Stomach After Drinking Liquid Nitrogen Cocktail

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "Liquid nitrogen, which has a boiling point of -196C, is becoming increasingly common at top restaurants as a method for instantly freezing food and drinks, or creating an impressive cloud of vapor or fog when exposed to air. Now BBC reports that a teenager has had emergency surgery to remove her stomach after drinking a cocktail containing liquid nitrogen. "This girl is the victim of an irresponsible alcohol industry that's now competing on gimmicks," says Doctor John Ashton, director of public health for Cumbria. "Alcohol itself is a very dangerous thing if improperly handled and liquid nitrogen is a toxic chemical. It destroys human tissue." If swallowed, liquid nitrogen can cause cold burns to the mouth, throat and stomach, killing the tissue. As the frozen vapor hits the stomach it rapidly warms, releasing large volumes of air which can burst the stomach. Doctors performed emergency surgery to remove Gaby Scanlon's stomach, an operation known as a total gastrectomy where the stomach is cut out and the remaining two tubes, the oesophagus and the small bowel, are connected. Science writer and fellow at the Royal Society of Chemistry John Emsley thinks the liquefied gas is safe in the hands of top chefs, and trained bartenders may be able to use it to create "sensational effects", but says there needs to be a very strong warning not to play with it. "It can be a bit of a novelty in the hands of experts, but it would be a different territory in the hands of the general public. If you put your finger in liquid nitrogen, it would go rock solid and fall off.""

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