Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×
Blackberry

Submission + - The new BlackBerry debacle (bgr.com)

redkemper writes: We all know BlackBerry is collapsing in America, so the new Kantar Worldpanel data showing its market share slipping below 2% in the United States is no shocker. Research In Motion’s performance in its second major market — the United Kingdom — is also pretty much as expected. Its UK market share slipped from 19% to 8% between the three months ending in October 2011 and the autumn of 2012. But what really pops out in the new Kantar data is BlackBerry’s performance in Brazil and the Mediterranean region, two crucially important markets for RIM...
Iphone

Submission + - An American-Made iPhone Won't Happen Now, Or Ever (vice.com)

pigrabbitbear writes: "A hot iPhone rumor made its way around the Internet on Thursday. It wasn’t an Apple rumor, though. It was a Foxconn rumor. And it wasn’t about a worker riot or suicide pacts, it was a rumor that a new Foxconn plant in the U.S. would lead to an American-made iPhone.

According to a Digitimes report, Foxconn is planning on opening up plants in the United States. Foxconn makes a lot of stuff, but as it’s one of Apple primary manufacturing partners, lots of people jumped to the salacious conclusion that a U.S.-based Foxconn factory could finally produce an American-made iPhone.

Foxconn denied the Digitimes report today. A company spokeswoman told CNET that the company actually “already has multiple facilities based in the U.S.” but that “there are no current plans to expand our operations there at this time.” Foxconn doesn’t make iPhones in the existing factories, and they don’t plan to."

Microsoft

Submission + - New IE Zero-Day Being Exploited in the Wild (securityweek.com)

wiredmikey writes: A new zero-day vulnerability affecting Internet Explorer is being exploited in the wild, and affects IE 9 and earlier. The vulnerability, if exploited, would allow full remote code execution and enable an attacker to take over an affected system.

Security researcher Eric Romang discovered the vulnerability and exploit over the weekend while monitoring some infected servers said to be used by the alleged Nitro gang. To run the attack, a file named “exploit.html” is the entry point of the attack, which loads “Moh2010.swf”

According to analysis by VUPEN, the exploit takes advantage of a “use-after-free vulnerability” that affects the mshtml.dll component of Internet Explorer.

Rapid7 on Monday released an exploit module for Metaspolit which will let security teams and attackers alike test systems.

As mentioned, Romang's first found the new zero-day code on the same server that was initially used to spread the recent Java zero-day, making people think they if both codes were not created by the same group, they are at least related.

Internet Explorer users should be consider switching to other browsers, such as Chrome or Firefox for the time being.

From what has been seen so far, the in-the-wild exploit only targets IE 8 and 7 on Windows XP only.

NASA

Submission + - Possible Disintegrating Alien Planet Found by Kepler (space.com)

DevotedSkeptic writes: "From Space.com:

A potential alien planet that is so close to its parent star that it appears to be disintegrating from the scorching heat was recently found by a team of astronomers. The planetary candidate is only slightly larger than the planet Mercury, and researchers estimate that it is shedding so much material that it could completely disintegrate within 100 million years.

Astronomers at NASA and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) detected the tiny planet, which is located roughly 1,500 light-years away, using data from the planet-hunting Kepler mission. As the possible planet evaporates, researchers theorize that it is followed by a trail of dust and debris, similar to the tail of a comet.

The dusty planet circles its host star once every 15 hours, which indicates that the star, named KIC 12557548, likely heats the planet to blistering temperatures of about 3,600 degrees Fahrenheit (1,982 degrees Celsius). The researchers hypothesize that under these conditions, the planet's rocky material melts and evaporates, creating a trailing wind of gas and dust in space.

"We think this dust is made up of submicron-sized particles," study leader Saul Rappaport, a professor emeritus of physics at MIT, said in a statement. "It would be like looking through a Los Angeles smog.""

Businesses

Submission + - Nokia hits junk credit rating (ibtimes.co.uk) 1

arielCo writes: "Quoth the International Business Times UK, among other sources: 'Nokia has had its creditworthiness downgraded to junk status by ratings company Moody's Investors Service after the troubled Finnish communications giant announced thousands of jobs cuts and warned of second quarter losses that are likely to be worse than expected. [...] Moody's had already warned in April that Nokia faced a downgrade to Ba1 — junk status — from Baa3, with a negative outlook.'"

Submission + - Goldback revisited (arxiv.org) 1

donaggie03 writes: "Well, my fellow mathematicians, it's that time again. Agostino Prástaro, from the Univeristy of Rome, claims to have proven Goldbach's Conjecture. The 14 page paper,
  THE GOLDBACH’S CONJECTURE PROVED (link to pdf) is pre-published on Arxiv. Prástaro claims to have proven the conjecture through commutative algebra and algebraic topology:
Abstract. We give a direct proof of the Goldbach’s conjecture in number theory, formulated in the Euler’s form. The proof is also constructive, since it gives a criterion to find two prime numbers 1, such that their sum gives a fixed even number 2. (A prime number is an integer that can be divided only for itself other than for 1. In this paper we consider 1 as a prime num-ber.) The proof is obtained by recasting the problem in the framework of the Commutative Algebra and Algebraic Topology.
So is this a valid proof? Are there any glaring errors or has this conjecture finally been proven?"

PlayStation (Games)

BioShock 2's First DLC Already On Disc 466

An anonymous reader writes with this quote from 1Up: "Trouble is brewing in Rapture. The recently released Sinclair Solutions multiplayer pack for BioShock 2 is facing upset players over the revelation that the content is already on the disc, and the $5 premium is an unlock code. It started when users on the 2K Forums noticed that the content is incredibly small: 24KB on the PC, 103KB on the PlayStation 3, and 108KB on the Xbox 360. 2K Games responded with a post explaining that the decision was made in order to keep the player base intact, without splitting it between the haves and have-nots."
AMD

Submission + - AMD ATI Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 Edition Demo'ed (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: "AMD's ATI Eyefinity technology has been seen driving three or four screens on a few occasions in the past, but today Hot Hardware had the opportunity to do some hands-on testing of AMD's forthcoming Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6, now that the card and the requisite software are maturing. As you can see in the videos, at an insanely high resolution of 5760x2160, across six 22-inch Dell LCDs, the forthcoming Radeon HD 5870 Eyefinity 6 could even drive 4X anti-aliasing and 8X anisotropic filtering for high image quality, all at very playable frame rates."
Data Storage

Exploring Advanced Format Hard Drive Technology 165

MojoKid writes "Hard drive capacities are sometimes broken down by the number of platters and the size of each. The first 1TB drives, for example, used five 200GB platters; current-generation 1TB drives use two 500GB platters. These values, however, only refer to the accessible storage capacity, not the total size of the platter itself. Invisible to the end-user, additional capacity is used to store positional information and for ECC. The latest Advanced Format hard drive technology changes a hard drive's sector size from 512 bytes to 4096 bytes. This allows the ECC data to be stored more efficiently. Advanced Format drives emulate a 512 byte sector size, to keep backwards compatibility intact, by mapping eight logical 512 byte sectors to a single physical sector. Unfortunately, this creates a problem for Windows XP users. The good news is, Western Digital has already solved the problem and HotHardware offers some insight into the technology and how it performs."

Slashdot Top Deals

A committee is a group that keeps the minutes and loses hours. -- Milton Berle

Working...