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Comment Re:Huh? (Score 1) 203

"A century ago, there would be a battle that wiped out the next village, you'd never even hear about it."

Huh? Maybe in the remote parts of Africa or some other place that was still stuck in the stone age. Maybe. In the parts of the worlds actually living in the (early) 20th century not so much.

I think there's some truth to this, in that not even that long ago when something awful happened far away it may have gotten printed in a larger newspaper but even then the details were spartan, often delayed by days or weeks (depending on how far back we're talking).

Do you honestly not grasp the difference between "next village" and "far away"? (Not to mention failing to grasp the standards of mass media that existed as early as the mid/late 19th century.)

Comment Re:Huh? (Score 1) 203

When will computer geeks grasp that most of the human race actually enjoys the company of others and that there are actual economic reasons why people cluster?

That's exactly what Kurzweil DID agree with. He said we've crowded into cities because we want to crowd. But it has downsides.

Um, no. Very few people want to crowd, because crowding is quite frankly uncomfortable. We put up with it because the benefits far exceed the downsides.

His contention is that as we improve communications and physical delivery of goods, we can have the economic benefits and companionship benefits of clustering without actually clustering.

Only if one is the stereotypical computer geek who doesn't actually enjoy the physical company of another. (And who doesn't grasp that 'crowding' delivers far more than economic and communications benefits.)

Comment Huh? (Score 4, Interesting) 203

"A century ago, there would be a battle that wiped out the next village, you'd never even hear about it."

Huh? Maybe in the remote parts of Africa or some other place that was still stuck in the stone age. Maybe. In the parts of the worlds actually living in the (early) 20th century not so much.

""We're only crowded because we've crowded ourselves into cities. Try taking a train trip across the United States, or Europe or Asia or anywhere in the world. Ninety-nine percent of the land is not used... we don't want to use it because you don't want to be out in the boondocks if you don't have people to work and play with. That's already changing now that we have some level of virtual communication..."

Not in the US, or most of Europe, or a good chunk of Asia. Not used for housing or urban sprawl isn't the same as not used. And no, it's actually changing much - communication isn't the only issue, access to stuff (physical goods) is also important, as is access to experiences. And neither have markedly changed if you live in the actual boondocks. (I find most people who live in big cities have little idea what conditions are like outside of the metro area.)

When will computer geeks grasp that most of the human race actually enjoys the company of others and that there are actual economic reasons why people cluster?

Comment Re:Pokemon Go to rake in nearly $13 Billion (Score 1) 79

Fireworks have been around in the US for a couple hundred years too - not once has the two week period leading up to a July 4th been extrapolated to annual sales directly.

Since you lack reading comprehension, I'll point out that I agreed with you in my original reply.
 

But to imagine that even 10% of the vast majority of bandwagon jumpers are going to continue the game

I'll repeat myself since you seem to have failed to grasp my point the first time - Pokemon Go players are, by and large, not bandwagon jumpers going from game to system to fad with each change in the wind. Pokemon Go is a new thing in the gaming world - who knows where it will go?

Comment Re:Pokemon Go to rake in nearly $13 Billion (Score 2) 79

Of course, this may be a bit like looking at the June 20-July 4 numbers for firework vendors in the US and extrapolating that to how much they'll make over a whole year by multiplying that number by 26. This windfall only happens if the game sustains it's frenzy for 24 months. This isn't a normally mobile crowd, and the next big game (or new Xbox/PS) is always right around the corner. I'm not sure that's really a likely scenario.

A twenty year old franchise, one with a steady history of money making games, movies, and various kinds of collectible... I wouldn't be in such a hurry to write it off. Not to mention, a good number of these players come from outside the "fad gamer" demographic. They didn't come from the Last Big Thing and they are unlikely to depart for the Next Big Thing. We're pretty much in entirely new territory here.
 
While the currently numbers are, as you correctly point out, unsustainable... Pokemon Go isn't going anywhere anytime soon.

Comment Re:Wait a minute (Score 1) 115

600,000 computers? How big do they think the U.S. Navy is anyway? That's almost two computers for every active duty service member. That's over 2,000 computers per ship.

0.o
 
There's more to the Navy than ships... there's hundreds of shore facilities and commands. In the same way, there's also untold number of DoD and DoN civilian employees and contractors at those facilities and commands.

Comment Re:Nothing more than a scrapyard (Score 1) 103

Didn't they announce the flight in early October would be the first reuse?

No. They announced the first re-use would be in "September or October", but no flight or customer has been specifically identified. And it's worth noting that originally the first re-use would be in "May or June" (of 2016).

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