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A Universal Turing Machine In 100 Punchcards Screenshot-sm 48

New submitter theclockworkcomputer writes "100 years ago tomorrow, Alan Turing was born. To celebrate, I wrote a Universal Turing Machine in 100 Punchcards. I've uploaded a video to explain a small part of the read head (the Jacquard). One needle is shown out of a total of 28. As this is about a program for a Turing Machine and not about a Turing Machine itself, I hope to be excused from the requirement of infinite tape."
Idle

Submission + - Life-sized Tamiya Radio Control Car (hobbymedia.it)

Modellismo writes: "The German garage, 'The Bug Box', created a full size replica of one of the most famous RC Cars of the 80s: the Tamiya Wild Willy. They even made a huge replica of the old Acoms radio to add an additional geek touch to this masterpiece.

Two years ago the same team created the 1/1th scale Tamiya Sand Scorcher that have been exhibited by Tamiya at the Nuremberg SpielwarenMesse 2010 (the World biggest toy fair)."

Government

Submission + - 'Nuclear free' city grants waiver for HP (computerworld.com)

dcblogs writes: The City of Takoma Park, Md. this week granted a waiver to its public library to allow it to use some new HP hardware, whose products are otherwise banned under its “nuclear free zone” ordinance. That law, adopted in 1983 one month after the Cold War-era movie “The Day After” was aired, prohibits the city from buying equipment from any company connected to U.S. nuclear weapons production. The library bought new Linux-based, x86 systems from a Canadian vendor and didn’t realize the vendor was using HP hardware. The hardware arrived in April and was unused until the Takoma Park city council granted it a waiver this week. The city’s list of banned contractors was developed in 2004 by a now inactive group, Nuclear Free America, and hasn’t been updated since.
Science

Submission + - Baltic Sea UFO Not a UFO at All (oceanexplorer.se)

Kilzfire writes: "Treasure hunters last year on June 11th doing sonar scans uncovered what looked to be a UFO at the bottom of the Baltic Sea. On the 15th of June this year they are reporting that the circle found at the bottom of the sea is comprised of mushroom cap shaped stones all interconnected. This circle of stone mushroom caps is 60 meters(196 feet) in length and about the same in diameter. World renown geologists are stating that this is no naturally occurring geological phenomenon. More scientists are relating that if it is a man made structure it is likely as old or older than the last ice age which is around 12,000 years ago."
Education

Grad Student Wins Alan Alda's Flame Challenge 161

eldavojohn writes "Scientists have long been criticized of their inability to communicate complex ideas adequately to the rest of society. Similar to his questions on PBS' Scientific American Frontiers, actor Alan Alda wrote to the journal Science with a proposition called The Flame Challenge (PDF). Contestants would have to explain a flame to an eleven-year-old kid, and the entries would be judged by thousands of children across the country. The winner of The Flame Challenge is quantum physics grad student Ben Ames, whose animated video covers concepts like pyrolysis, chemiluminescence, oxidation and incandescence boiled into a humorous video, complete with song. Now they are asking children age 10-12 to suggest the next question for the Flame Challenge. Kids out there, what would you like scientists to explain?"
Android

Submission + - Facial Recognition To Be Used In San Francisco Bars (techfleece.com)

TheGift73 writes: "Bars in San Francisco are going to start to use Facial Recognition software that will stream in real-time the male to female ratios of patrons. The app is currently servicing Chicago, Austin, Bloomington, Gainesville, and Madison with SF going live last Friday.

The software is made by an Austin, Texas based night-life startup called SceneTap and will give users of the free app, the ability to see what the the current ambience of the bar/club is like as well as the average age of the clients."

Hardware

Submission + - Future smartphone cameras to see through walls (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A team at the University of Texas in Dallas have managed to create a terahertz band imaging chip manufactured using CMOS. It's a major breakthrough as it means we could all one day be carrying around smartphones with cameras that can see through walls. It also means doctors could use their phones as portable X-ray units, as well as for a range of other medical tests. We can check out what's in a wall before drilling into it, and manufacturers can test products for faults by taking a picture of their insides.
Privacy

Submission + - Europe agrees to send airline passenger data to US (computerworlduk.com) 1

Qedward writes: The European Parliament has approved the controversial data transfer agreement, the bilateral PNR (passenger name register), with the US which requires European airlines to pass on passenger information, including name, contact details, payment data, itinerary, email and phone numbers to the Department of Homeland Security.

Under the new agreement, PNR data will be "depersonalised" after six months and would be moved into a "dormant database" after five years. However the information would still be held for a further 15 years before being fully "anonymised".

The PNR data will be stored in the US's Automated Targeting System (ATS). ATS is used to improve the collection, use, analysis, and dissemination of information that is gathered for the primary purpose of targeting, identifying, and preventing potential terrorists and terrorist weapons from entering the US...

Facebook

House Kills Effort To Stop Workplace Requests For Facebook Passwords 275

An anonymous reader writes "House Republicans today defeated an amendment introduced yesterday that would have banned employers demanding access to Facebook accounts. While the practice isn't widespread, it has caused a big brouhaha after reports surfaced that some organizations were requiring workers to hand over Facebook passwords as a condition of keeping their current job or getting hired for a new one."
Wireless Networking

Submission + - IETF attendees reengineer their hotel's Wi-Fi net (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: What happens when a bunch of IETF super nerds show up in Paris for a major conference and discover their hotel's Wi-Fi network has imploded? They give it an Extreme Wi-Fi Makeover. Members of the Internet Engineering Task Force, who gathered for the outfit’s 83rd meeting this week in France, discovered earlier this week as they arrived at the toney Hotel Concorde Lafayette that the Wi-Fi was flakey and became flakier still as scores more attendees arrived and tried to connect, and the wired net was having issues of its own. Working behind the scenes, a team of IETF attendees negotiated with the hotel and were granted access to the wireless network, and began rigging up all sorts of fixes, which even included taping a Nexus S phone to a ceiling and turning off the radios on numerous access points to reduce noise.

Submission + - Redheads Feel Pain Differently Than the Rest of Us (sciencenordic.com)

schwit1 writes: If you think redheads are inherently different, well, you'd be right; they're better than you. In fact, they have a higher pain threshold than most of us, and can handle spicier food, too.

It turns out that gingers are less sensitive to stinging pain in the skin, according to researchers who injected capsicum, the active ingredient in chilies, into the arms of patients. Professor Lars Arendt-Nielsen, one of the researchers, said:

        "Our tests showed that redheads are less sensitive to this particular type of pain. They react less to pressure close to the injected area, or to a pinprick. They seem to be a bit better protected, and that is a really interesting finding."

The finding also means redheads can handle spicier food, reports Science Nordic. It lends some scientific weight to previous suggestions that gingers have a different pain response to the rest of, which were even investigated by Myth Busters.

All of which points to the fact that there is a ginger gene that brings with it these subtle differences. Proof, if you needed it, that gingers aren't just different; they're better.

The Media

Rob Malda (CmdrTaco) Joins the Washington Post 232

kodiaktau writes "Slashdot founder and long time cat herder Rob Malda joins the Washington Post per an announcement today. According to the press release, he will be the Chief Strategist and Editor-at-Large working for WaPo Labs." Rob has a more detailed description of the job on his blog: "Don Graham is trying to accomplish something that is a bit of a cliche these days: A startup inside an established corporation. A group that can exist at a nexus between newspapers, websites, cable networks, and TV stations and think about the big picture and the future without the normal burdens associated with a business operating at a large scale. ... They are actively iterating and experimenting in many directions, with strong support from the top of the organization. ... Washington Post executive editor Marcus Brauchli assures me that I'll also be working with the newsroom where I can contribute words, ideas, and tools that will improve the experience of the journalists doing work that I personally believe transcends the bottom line."
Hardware

Submission + - Blizzard is selling old World of Warcraft servers (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Blizzard Entertainment has found a sure fire way to raise a lot of money for charity. The developer has decided to sell off around 350 retired HP p-Class server blades on eBay to the highest bidder. Each one has spent time helping to keep World of Warcraft online, and there’s a good chance if you’re a long-time player of the MMO you’ve set foot on one of these blades.

Blizzard is classing the servers as having been honorably discharged from service and has turned them into collectors’ items. Each one has a plaque stating the WoW realm name it served along with the month and year of its active duty. There is also a description of why the blade servers are so important to the game, and the signatures of the World of Warcraft team have been included at the bottom.

Submission + - Student wins case against high school prayer banne (examiner.com) 1

dcherk writes: A student has won her lawsuit against Rhode Island’s Cranston High School West. The school MUST separate Church and State and stop prayer, since tradition does not trump the constitution.

From the court's ruling: 'While all agree that some traditions should be honored, others must be put to rest as our national values and notions of tolerance and diversity evolve. At any rate, no amount of history and tradition can cure a constitutional infraction.'

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