Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Get HideMyAss! VPN, PC Mag's Top 10 VPNs of 2016 for 55% off for a Limited Time ×

Submission + - Apple knew of iCloud brute-force vulnerability since March

blottsie writes: Apple knew as early as March 2014 of a security hole that left the personal data of iCloud users vulnerable, according to leaked emails between the company and a noted security researcher.

In a March 26 email, security researcher Ibrahim Balic tells an Apple official that he’s successfully bypassed a security feature designed to prevent “brute-force” attacks. Balic goes on to explain to Apple that he was able to try over 20,000 passwords combinations on any account.

Submission + - Every Drone Mission the FBI Admits to Flying (vice.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The FBI insists that it uses drone technology to conduct surveillance in “very limited circumstances.” What those particular circumstances are remain a mystery, particularly since the Bureau refuses to identify instances where agents deployed unmanned aerial vehicles, even as far back as 2006.

In a letter to Senator Ron Paul last July, the FBI indicated that it had used drones a total of ten times since late 2006—eight criminal cases and two national security cases—and had authorized drone deployments in three additional cases, but did not actually fly them. The sole specific case where the FBI is willing to confirm using a drone was in February 2013, as surveillance support for a child kidnapping case in Alabama.

New documents obtained by MuckRock as part of the Drone Census flesh out the timeline of FBI drone deployments in detail that was previously unavailable. While heavily redacted—censors deemed even basic facts that were already public about the Alabama case to be too sensitive for release, apparently—these flight orders, after action reviews and mission reports contain new details of FBI drone flights.

Submission + - Slashdot's own "Nobots" is now in print!

mcgrew writes: Nobots isn't a Dice Holdings book, it's a slashdot book. The first chapter written was a response to a comment in a slashdot story way back in 2009. Quite a few chapters were typed directly into slashdot's journal entry. A few were posted before a book became apparent and all of them garnered comments that improved the story, and it became a book. Your book.

Right now you can only get it here, which I hope to change because of problems with the cover, the ISBN, and the bar code.

The crude first drafts of its chapters are here at slashdot already, and the final polished versions will be posted in my site weekly starting next Saturday. Chapter 1 is here. Chapter 2 will be posted Saturday.

The final book is about twice as long as the draft. It's a CC license, free to read, only the printed versions cost. Enjoy!

Submission + - Facebook lets beheading clips return to social network (bbc.co.uk)

another random user writes: Facebook is allowing videos showing people being decapitated to be posted and shared on its site once again.


The social network had placed a temporary ban on the material in May following complaints that the clips could cause long-term psychological damage.


The US firm now believes its users should be free to watch and condemn, but not celebrate, such videos. One suicide prevention charity criticised the move.


"It only takes seconds of exposure to such graphic material to leave a permanent trace — particularly in a young person's mind," said Dr Arthur Cassidy, a former psychologist who runs a branch of the Yellow Ribbon Program in Northern Ireland. "The more graphic and colourful the material is, the more psychologically destructive it becomes."


Decapitation videos are available elsewhere on the net — including on Google's YouTube — but critics have raised concern that Facebook's news feeds and other sharing functions mean it is particularly adept at spreading such material.

Submission + - Protesters Are Dodging Sudan's Internet Shutdown with a Phone-Powered Crowdmap (vice.com)

Lasrick writes: Motherboard's Africa correspondent, Amanda Sperber, has a great piece just posted on how protestors in Sudan are getting around the government's shutdown of the internet. Good read: 'Since Wednesday afternoon, Sudan's internet has been sporadically shut off amid a fifth day of protests against President Omar al Bashir’s regime. Despite the attempt to cut off communications and limit organization and reporting on the ground, a group of tech-savvy people based in Khartoum have developed a map for recording key data about the protests that's powered by cell networks. '

Submission + - The Chromochord: Biotech's First Musical Instrument Plays Proteins Like A Piano (scientificamerican.com)

Josiah Zayner writes: The Chromochord allows a musician to vibrate proteins quantum mechanically with light just like they would a piano string. The basis of the Chromochord is the engineered Light-Oxygen-Voltage protein domain from Avena sativa(Oat). Absorption of light causes the chromophore in the protein to undergo a quantum mechanical energy transition that reversibly changes the absorption spectra and whose measurement modulates the pitch of notes being played. Josiah Zayner, the inventor of the Chromochord, has been working with the composer Francisco Castillo Trigueros to create complex musical compositions based on this protein nanotechnology.

Submission + - Bradley Manning Sentenced to 35 Years (firedoglake.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: After a long and protracted trial, Judge Denise Lind has handed down a sentence in the Bradley Manning case: 35 years and a dishonorable discharge. Manning initially faced a maximum sentence of 135 years, which was reduced to 90 years when Manning was found not guilty of Espionage Act offenses and certain other charged were merged. He has already served over 1000 days in prison, and his sentence will be reduced by 1,274 days.

Submission + - Researchers Send Data Without Battery, Transmitter (itworld.com)

itwbennett writes: Engineers at the University of Washington have developed a pair of devices that can exchange data at speeds of up to 10kbps over a distance of up to 1 meter — without batteries or transmitting any signals. The devices, which can communicate by reflecting or absorbing TV signals, could be useful in applications as varied as wearable devices or building sensors.

Submission + - UK ISP Filter Will Censor More Than Porn (ibtimes.com) 1

coolnumbr12 writes: The Open Rights Group spoke with several ISPs and found that in addition to pornography, users will also be required to opt in for any content tagged as violent material, extremist and terrorist related content, anorexia and eating disorder websites, suicide related websites, alcohol, smoking, web forums, esoteric material and web blocking circumvention tools. These will all be filtered by default, and the majority of users never change default settings with online services.

Submission + - Some Windows XP users just can't afford to upgrade (networkworld.com) 2

colinneagle writes: During a recent trip to an eye doctor, I noticed that she was still using Windows XP. After I suggested that she might need to upgrade soon, she said she couldn't because she couldn't afford the $10,000 fee involved with the specialty medical software that has been upgraded for Windows 7. Software written for medical professionals is not like mass market software. They have a limited market and can't make back their money in volume because there isn't the volume for an eye doctor's database product like there is for Office or Quicken.

With many expecting Microsoft's upcoming end-of-support for XP to cause a security nightmare of unsupported Windows devices in the wild, it seems a good time to ask how many users may fall into the category of wanting an upgrade, but being priced out by expensive but necessary third-party software. More importantly, can anything be done about it?

The Media

Submission + - Could Twitter Have Stopped the Media's Rush To War In Iraq Ten Years Ago?

Hugh Pickens writes writes: "On the tenth anniversary of the start of the US invasion of Iraq, Eric Boehlert writes that he wishes that Twitter had been around during the winter of 2002-2003 to provide a forum for critics to badger Beltway media insiders who abdicated their role as journalists and fell in line behind the Bush White House's march to war. "Twitter could have helped puncture the Beltway media bubble by providing news consumers with direct access to confront journalists during the run-up to the war," writes Boehlert. "And the pass-around nature of Twitter could have rescued forgotten or buried news stories and commentaries that ran against the let's-go-to-war narrative that engulfed so much of the mainstream press." For example, imagine how Twitter could have been used in real time on February 5, 2003, when Secretary of State Colin Powell made his infamous attack-Iraq presentation to the United Nations. At the time, Beltway pundits positively swooned over Powell's air-tight case for war. "But Twitter could have swarmed journalists with instant analysis about the obvious shortcoming. That kind of accurate, instant analysis of Powell's presentation was posted on blogs but ignored by a mainstream media enthralled by the White House's march to war." Ten years ago, Twitter could have also performed the task of making sure news stories that raised doubts about the war didn't fall through the cracks, as invariably happened back then. With swarms of users touting the reports, it would have been much more difficult for reporters and pundits to dismiss important events and findings. "Ignoring Twitter, and specifically ignoring what people are saying about your work on Twitter, isn't really an option the way turning a blind eye to anti-war bloggers may have been ten years ago," concludes Boehlert. "In other words, Twitter could have been the megaphone — the media equalizer — that war critics lacked ten years ago,""
Bitcoin

Submission + - World's First Bitcoin ATM (cnet.com)

bill_mcgonigle writes: "I just bought bitcoins from the World's first Bitcoin ATM at Liberty Forum. I created an account using an Android Bitcoin client, held up its QR code to the Raspberry Pi-based device's optical scanner, fed in a $20 Federal Reserve Note, and got back a confirmation QR code on its display (which I then scanned and checked the third-party confirmation URL). The machine can function on any wireless network and will soon be available for purchase by merchants, who can make a commission on customers' Bitcoin purchases."
Science

Submission + - Determinism and Its Enemies Are Still Waging War over the Soul of Science (vice.com)

derekmead writes: Wherever determinism appears, controversy attends, raising specters of days when colonialists, eugenicists, public health officials, and political idealists believed they could cure the human condition through manipulation and force. Understanding those fears helps shed light on the controversy surrounding a recent paper (PDF) published in the American Economic Review, entitled, “The ‘Out of Africa’ Hypothesis, Human Genetic Diversity, and Comparative Economic Development.” In it, economists Quamrul Ashraf and Oded Galor argue that the economic development of broad human populations correlate with their levels of genetic diversity—which is, in turn, pinned to the distance its inhabitants migrated from Africa thousands of years ago. Reaction has been swift and vehement.

An article signed by 18 academics in Current Anthropology accuses the researchers of “bad science”—“something false and undesirable” based on “weak data and methods” that “can become a justification for reactionary policy.” The paper attacks everything from its sources of population data to its methods for measuring genetic diversity, but the economists are standing by their methods. The quality of Ashraf and Galor's research notwithstanding, the debate illustrates just how tricky it's become to assert anything which says something about human development was in any way inevitable.

Slashdot Top Deals

Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler. -- Albert Einstein

Working...