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Government

Some WikiLeaks Contributions To Public Discourse 299

Hugh Pickens writes "The EFF argues that regardless of the heated debate over the propriety of the actions of WikiLeaks, some of the cables have contributed significantly to public and political conversations around the world. The Guardian reported on a cable describing an incident in Afghanistan in which employees of DynCorp, a US military contractor, hired a 'dancing boy,' an under-aged boy dressed as a woman, who dances for a gathering of men and is then prostituted — an incident that contributed important information to the debate over the use of private military contractors. A cable released by WikiLeaks showed that Pfizer allegedly sought to blackmail a Nigerian regulator to stop a lawsuit against drug trials on children. A WikiLeaks revelation that the United States used bullying tactics to attempt to push Spain into adopting copyright laws even more stringent than those in the US came just in time to save Spain from the kind of misguided copyright laws that cripple innovation and facilitate online censorship. An article by the NY Times analyzed cables released which indicated the US is having difficulties in fulfilling Obama's promise to close the Guantánamo Bay detention camp and is now considering incentives in return for other countries accepting detainees, including a one-on-one meeting with Obama or assistance with the IMF. 'These examples make clear that WikiLeaks has brought much-needed light to government operations and private actions,' writes Rainey Reitman, 'which, while veiled in secrecy, profoundly affect the lives of people around the world and can play an important role in a democracy that chooses its leaders.'"
Censorship

Submission + - Bing Requiring Strict SafeSearch in Arab Countries 9

D-Fly writes: Well, here's another nail in Bing's coffin as far as I am concerned. They've introduced regional preferences that are not changeable when you are traveling. I am in North Africa right now, in one of the Arab countries, and Bing's preferences are not allowing me to turn off Safe Searching. The preferences page says "Your country or region requires a strict Bing SafeSearch setting, which filters out results that might return adult content." Even people who don't use search engines to look for adult content often turn off "Safe Searching" since it can block material that isn't pornographic. But Microsoft won't give people here that option. Google on the other hand still permits "Safe Search" to be switched off.

BMP screen shots attached.

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