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Submission + - Why Comcast will Vehemently Fight a DOJ Investigation (broadbandconvergent.com)

broadbandconvergent writes: "If your company becomes a huge dominate market player in both broadband and content delivery, scrutiny will come your way, like it or not. Comcast (NASDAQ: CMCSA) has been so successful in building both a content and delivery system to such a mass audience; it’s beginning to look like former monopolies which grew unwanted investigations and break-ups in the 1980’s. Remember AT&T and the DOJ anti-trust decision to split the monopoly into smaller regional companies?"
Verizon

Submission + - Verizon Wireless Goes Ahead With "Bucket" Data Plans (usatoday.com)

CanHasDIY writes: Previously, it was reported that Verizon was considering eliminating their current data plan scheme, as well as the grandfathered unlimited plans, in favor of a new 'bucket' plan in which up to 10 devices would share a data allotment. Verizon officially acknowledged it today, called the "Share Everything" plan, which will go into effect as of June 28, 2012;
according to USA Today:

Under the new pricing plan, a smartphone customer opting for the cheapest data bucket, 1 gigabyte, will pay $90 before taxes and fees ($40 for phone access and $50 for 1 GB). Customers can add a basic phone, laptop and tablet to share data for $30, $20 and $10, respectively.

Those of us still grandfathered into the unlimted plan will be forced to either sign up for Share Everything, or one of the tiered pricing plans currently in effect.

Technology

Submission + - Using infrared cameras to find tastiness of beef (examiner.com)

JoshuaInNippon writes: Might we one day be able to use our cell phone cameras to pick out the best piece of meat on display at the market? Some Japanese seem to hope so. A team of scientists are using infrared camera technology to try and determine the tastiest slices of high-grade Japanese beef. The researchers believe that the levels of Oleic acid found within the beef strongly affect the beef's tenderness, smell, and overall taste. The camera's infrared rays can be tuned to pick out the Oleic acid levels through a whole slab, a process that would be impossible to do with the human eye. While the accuracy is still relatively low, a test tasting this month resulted in only 60% of participants preferring beef that was believed to have had a higher level of Oleic acid, the researchers hope to fine tune the process for market testing by next year.
Education

Ocean-Crossing Dragonflies Discovered 95

grrlscientist writes "While living and working as a marine biologist in Maldives, Charles Anderson noticed sudden explosions of dragonflies at certain times of year. He explains how he carefully tracked the path of a plain, little dragonfly called the Globe Skimmer, Pantala flavescens, only to discover that it had the longest migratory journey of any insect in the world."
Intel

Linux Foundation To Host Intel's Moblin Project 30

gustavopuy writes with news that Intel will be transferring control of Moblin, its Linux-based OS for mobile devices, to the Linux Foundation. Quoting Ars Technica: "We spoke with Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, who told us that the Linux Foundation offers a vendor-neutral setting for advancing the Moblin project. He believes that such an environment will help stimulate third-party involvement in the process of building the platform and could also encourage broader adoption. ... Zemlin explained that the Linux Foundation's stewardship of the project will empower third-party contributors to expand the platform beyond its Intel-specific roots. He assures me that Intel sees value in making Moblin open to everyone — including companies that are leveraging Linux on competing processors, such as those based on the ARM architecture."
Encryption

Quantum Computing Not an Imminent Threat To Public Encryption 119

Bruce Schneier's latest blog entry points out an interesting analysis of how quantum computing will affect public encryption. The author takes a look at some of the mathematics involved with using a quantum computer to run a factoring algorithm, and makes some reasonable assumptions about the technological constraints faced by the developers of the technology. He concludes that while quantum computing could be a threat to modern encryption, it is not the dire emergency some researchers suggest.
Programming

The P.G. Wodehouse Method of Refactoring 133

covertbadger notes a developer's blog entry on a novel way of judging progress in refactoring code. "Software quality tools can never completely replace the gut instinct of a developer — you might have massive test coverage, but that won't help with subjective measures such as code smells. With Wodehouse-style refactoring, we can now easily keep track of which code we are happy with, and which code we remain deeply suspicious of."

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