Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Biotech

Submission + - In-Vitro Muscle Cells. It's What's For Dinner (reuters.com)

wanzeo writes: Within the last decade, many of us have experienced the encroachment of ethics into our mealtime. Phrases such as vegetarian, vegan, organic, bST, GMO, etc. have become part of common grocery store advertising. The most recent addition to the list of ethically charged food is in-vitro meat, or meat that was cultured in a petri dish, and was never part of a live animal. The project has been brought to fruition by Mark Post, a biologist at the University of Maastricht in the Netherlands. Grown using animal stem-cells on a nutrient medium, the nearly see-through strips of muscle would need to be stacked nearly 3,000 times to approach the thickness of a burger. The practice promises to be more humane, sustainable, and efficient than conventional meats, with one analysis suggesting it would, "use 35 to 60 percent less energy, emit 80 to 95 percent less greenhouse gas and use around 98 percent less land". In a world where nearly half of all crop production is used to feed livestock, a move towards artificial meat may be inevitable.
Networking

Submission + - TDP: The Darknet Plan (arstechnica.com)

gabrielpark writes: "A group of Internet activists gathered last week in an Internet Relay Chat (IRC) channel to begin planning an ambitious project—they hope to overcome electronic surveillance and censorship by creating a whole new Internet. The group, which coordinates its efforts through the Reddit social networking site, calls its endeavor The Darknet Project (TDP). (I thought it was "The Darknet PLAN", but whatever...)"
Security

Submission + - Massive DNS Cache Poisoning Hits Brazil (net-security.org) 1

Orome1 writes: A massive DNS cache poisoning attack attempting to infect users trying to access popular websites is currently under way in Brazil, according to Kaspersky Lab expert Fabio Assolini. Brazil has some big ISPs. Official statistics suggest the country has 73 million computers connected to the Internet, and the major ISPs average 3 or 4 million customers each. If a cybercriminal can change the DNS cache in just one server, the number of potential victims is huge. And that is exactly what has been happening during last week. Users trying to reach Google, YouTube, Facebook and other popular global and local sites were being faced with pop-up windows telling them to install "Google Defence" and similar thematic software or Java applet in order to be able to access the wanted site.
Canada

Submission + - Why Copyright Reform Is Not the Cure for What Ails (youtube.com)

An anonymous reader writes: This weekend, Michael Geist delivered a keynote address at the Nova Scotia Music Week conference. The talk — Why Copyright Reform Is Not the Cure for What Ails the Music Industry (YouTube, Blip.tv) — offers a complete takedown of the industry's talking points on lost sales and the impact of peer-to-peer file sharing while explaining why the implications of the proposed Canadian DMCA for statutory damages, ISP liability, and digital locks.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: spoof an email bounce? 2

An anonymous reader writes: One cool feature I used on kMail years ago was the ability to generate a spoofed email bounce for any given message I had received, which claimed delivery failed because of an unknown recipient. While this doesn't exactly align with expected behaviour from a mail client, it was a useful way of easily getting off mailing lists (automated, or manually created by freaky acquaintances!).

This is something I really miss, so I'm wondering if there are any mail clients for Windows that provide similar functionality?

Submission + - Could crowd-sourced democracy be made to work? (google.com) 1

maccallr writes: The Occupy Movement is getting everyone talking about how to fix the world's economic (and social, environmental...) problems. It is even trialling new forms of "open" democracy. Trouble is, it's easy to criticise the physical occupiers for being unrepresentative of the general population — and much of their debating time is spent on practical rather than policy issues. Well-meaning but naive occupiers could be susceptible to exploitation by the political establishment and vested interests. In the UK, virtual occupiers are using Google Moderator to propose and debate policy in the comfort of their homes (where, presumably, it is easier to find out stuff you didn't know). Could something like this be done on a massive scale (national or global) to reach consensus on what needs to be done? How do you maximise participation by "normal folk" on complex issues? What level of participation could be considered quorate? How do you deal with block votes? What can we learn from e-petitions and Iceland's crowd-sourced constitution? Is the "Occupy" branding appropriate? What other pitfalls are there? Or are existing models of democracy and dictatorship fit for purpose?
Canada

Submission + - One Millionth Tower High-Rise Documentary Takes Fo (wired.com)

theweatherelectric writes: One Millionth Tower is a documentary about the high-rise apartment residential areas of Toronto. The documentary is presented using an interesting combination of HTML5, WebGL, Popcorn.js, and three.js. From the article: 'The movie, which makes its online premiere above, was carefully crafted to be watched on the internet. It uses interactive tools to illustrate the Toronto residents’ ideas about how to improve the decaying high-rise in which they live. Powered entirely by HTML5 and open source JavaScript libraries, One Millionth Tower is loaded with photos and information from all over the web, and exists in an online environment that is about as close to three-dimensional as something on a flat screen can get.'
Idle

Submission + - Guru Tries to Kill Man Via Magic on Live TV &F (timesonline.co.uk)

Lord Xenu writes: "When Pandit Surender Sharma, a famous Indian guru, made a boast about being able to kill people with his mind on live TV, someone actually took him up on the offer and asked him to prove it by killing him. After doing all kinds of things like chanting mantras and waving a knife around for hours, the guru was forced to admit defeat when his victim somehow avoided dying from laughter. It's not subtitled, but you can see the video on YouTube (part 2 | part 3) if you want to see it for yourself."
Medicine

Method To Repair Damaged Adult Nerves Discovered 128

An anonymous reader writes "Researchers have discovered a promising method to regrow damaged nerves in adults. Brain and spinal-cord injuries typically leave people with permanent impairment because the injured nerve fibers (axons) cannot regrow. A study from Harvard and Carleton University, published in the December 10 issue of the journal Neuron, shows that axons can regenerate vigorously in a mouse model when a gene that suppresses natural growth factors is deleted. Here is the journal article (subscription required to view more than the abstract)."
Google

Submission + - Googles free sat-nav

CptnHarlock writes: CNBC and BBC report that as Google steps into yet another market shares in conventional GPS devices fell hard today after the search giant unveiled its free Google Maps Navigation sat-nav application for mobile devices on wednsday. Tom-tom fell 13% and Garmin 18%. When the Motorola Droid arrives and other "Swiss Army knife" smartphones follow — will conventional standalone GPS devices go away? Will they go without a fight or will they try to sue their way back into our hearts (or wallets)?

Slashdot Top Deals

"Trust me. I know what I'm doing." -- Sledge Hammer

Working...