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Submission + - Cloud Migration and Portability: What VMware and AWS Aren't Telling You (rightscale.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A few days ago Amazon announced its new AWS Management Portal for vCenter, which allows VMware users to manage AWS workloads from vCenter and to import VMware golden images to AWS using its VM Import utility. VMware responded with a “Don’t Be Fooled” blog, noting that AWS provided “no easy way to move workloads back to one of your data centers, or to another cloud provider.” The blog went on to suggest that VMware was a better option for cloud migration and portability. The hard truth: migrating an existing virtualized application to a cloud, while definitely possible and often a very smart option, is not a push-button affair — no matter what VM import or image translation tool might exist.

Submission + - Evolving With a Little Help From Our Friends (simonsfoundation.org)

An anonymous reader writes: You could call it Seth Bordenstein’s “Frankenstein” moment. A little over a year ago, Bordenstein, a biologist at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee, and his then-graduate student, Robert Brucker, mated two incompatible species of wasp in the lab, creating a hardy hybrid that lived when most others died.

Normally, when members of two related species of parasitic wasps in the genus Nasonia, N. giraulti and N. longicornis, mate with their more distant relative N. vitripennis, the hybrid offspring die. Until recently, no one could figure out exactly why, but it was clear that this was one of the major barriers dividing the species. But when Bordenstein and Brucker treated the wasps with antibiotics, eliminating the millions of microbes that lived on their bodies, they found that many of the hybrid offspring unexpectedly could survive and thrive. By stripping off the wasps’ microbiomes — the microbial community inhabiting the insects — Bordenstein and Brucker had brought a totally new hybrid wasp to life.

The findings, published in Science in July 2013, highlight a surprising idea in biology: that symbiosis — a long-term, stable and often beneficial interaction between organisms — could drive two populations apart, the first step in the development of new species.

Piracy

Submission + - Google looks to cut funds to illegal sites (telegraph.co.uk)

rbrandis writes: Google is in discussions with payment companies including Visa, Mastercard and PayPal to put illegal download websites out of existence by cutting off their funding. If Google goes ahead with the radical move, it would not mark the first time that illegal websites have been diminished or driven out of business by having a block put on their source of cash.

Submission + - Why hasn't 3D taken off for the web?

clockwise_music writes: "With HTML5 we're closer to the point where a browser can do almost everything that a native app can do. The final frontier is 3D, but WebGL isn't even part of the HTML5 standard, Microsoft refuse to support it, Apple want to push their native apps and it's not supported in the Android mobile browser. Flash used to be an option but Adobe have dropped mobile support. To reach most people you'd have to learn Javascript, WebGL and Three.js/Scene.js for Chrome/Firefox, then you'd have to learn actionscript + flash for the microsofties, then learn objective c for the apple fanboyz, then learn Java to write a native app for Android. Phew!

When will 3D finally become available for all? Do you think it's inevitable or will it never see the light of day?"
Network

Submission + - New "chemical internet" is able to compute chemical reactions

daftna writes: Living on Earth has a story about a chemist who has made software to map the almost infinite number of possible chemical reactions: "Imagine a huge network, but instead of computers connected by nodes, we have molecules connected by reactions. And this information has been created not by me ... but by every chemist that ever lived." The network is a sort of a chemical search engine that has a new way of analyzing chemistry and finding optimal synthetic pathways out of the trillions of possibilities one would normally have to find by trial and error. Instead, "What we can do, having all the collective knowledge ever created in chemistry [is] train the computer to extract certain patterns automatically and these patterns are then based not on our individual experience but on the experiences of everything that was used to train the computer — meaning every single reaction ever performed." He calls it "Chematica" and details of the system are published in the journal Angewandte Chemie
Transportation

Submission + - High School Students Build a 300 MPG Car (allcarselectric.com) 2

thecarchik writes: A group of high school students from the DeLaSalle School in Kansas City, Mo., have set out to build an electric car aimed at setting a new world record for efficiency. Working closely with engineers from Bridgestone Americas' Technical Center in Akron, Ohio, the students have just concluded tests on their electric car at the tire company’s Texas Proving Grounds and believe they have already set a new record. Test runs reported efficiency levels that would be the equivalent of more than 300 mpg and the team are now petitioning Guinness World Records to consider the accomplishments as a new world record.
Hardware

Submission + - Chips that flow with probabilities, not bits (technologyreview.com)

holy_calamity writes: "Boston company Lyric Semiconductor has taken the wraps off a microchip designed for statistical calculations that eschews digital logic. It's still made from silicon transistors. But they are arranged gates that compute with analogue signals representing probabilities, not binary bits. That makes it easier to implement calculations of probabilities, says the company, which has a chip for correcting errors in flash memory claimed to be 30 times smaller than a digital logic-based equivalent."
Science

Submission + - P != NP - or does it?

Coz writes: Vinay Deolalikar of HP published a "proof" last week that P != NP — one of the Holy Grails of computational theory. Since then, there have been several lively discussions on whether, and how, the proof holds up, and even the NY Times has weighted in — although their emphasis is on how fast the review has been, in the degree to which technologies have been employed to generate deeper insight and allow more people to examine such things faster.

Submission + - Rocket Thrusters Used to Treat Sewage (gizmag.com)

Zothecula writes: Rocket engines are generally not thought of as being environmentally-friendly, but thanks to a newly-developed process, we may someday see them neutralizing the emissions from wastewater treatment plants. The same process would also see those plants generating their own power, thus meaning they would be both energy-neutral and emissions-free. Developed by two engineers at Stanford University, the system starts with the formation of nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane gas — something that treatment plants traditionally try to avoid.

Submission + - Servers That Generate Their Own Electricity (datacenterknowledge.com)

1sockchuck writes: What if your web server could generate its own power? A small New York company has developed prototypes of servers and switches that use waste heat from the devices to generate electricity using thermoelectric effects. A growing number of data center operators are finding ways to harness the heat generated by racks of servers, but most choose to use waste heat to warm nearby offices or other parts of the data center. Applied Methodologies Inc. has taken a different approach, seeking to convert the waste heat back into small amounts of electricity that can be aggregated to power equipment within the data center.
Intel

Submission + - Intel launches Montvale Itanium chip

Sobaz writes: Intel announced today its line of Itanium products for high-end computing servers. Codename Montvale, originally due in 2006, the launch of Montvale has been held up until now. Like Montecito, the new Itanium chip is based on a manufacturing process with circuitry dimensions of 90 nanometers, ships in seven iterations consisting of six dual-core chips and a single-core chip. There are 3 new features over the current Itanium line.

1. Core level lock-step- improves the data integrity by eliminating undetected errors in the core 2. A power management feature known as demand based switching (DBS) 3. An increase in the front side bus (FSB) performance by up to 667MHz
Java

Submission + - Lost faith in unit testing...

An anonymous reader writes: I am currently working in a small team of 4 developpers (including myself) and we are developping a transactionnal web application using JSF and EJBs. For a few months now, we've been trying to integrate unit testing in our development cycle, but my faith in unit teting is growing smaller every day. I know its a good thing, but maybe its just not well suited for our kind of development. At first, we were doing the whole packang, including mocking every know and then for ejbs, even database (using hsqldb in memory replication of the real db). Now we focus more on testing the JSF backing beans, but I'm feeling we invest way too much in writing unit tests for what we get in return. The fact that most of the team is junior is also hurting us a lot, since writing good unit tests is directly related to programming experience in my opinion. Any thoughts? Experiences in similar projects with unit testing? Please convince me back that unit testing is a good thing!
Sci-Fi

Submission + - British army tests invisible invisble tank

SK writes: "The Ministry of Defense has unveiled a new technology that can make tanks invisible. They carried out secret trials recently and have stated that the invisible tank would be ready for service by 2012.The technology involves using cameras and projectors to beam images of the surrounding landscape onto a tank. As a result, anyone looking in the direction of the vehicle only sees what is beyond it and not the tank itself."

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Fools ignore complexity. Pragmatists suffer it. Some can avoid it. Geniuses remove it. -- Perlis's Programming Proverb #58, SIGPLAN Notices, Sept. 1982

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