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Submission + - CNET parent organization blocks review and award to Dish over legal dispute (cnn.com)

Coldeagle writes: It looks as if CNET's parent company, CBS, has laid down the law:

Just one day after CNet named the Dish "Hopper," a new TV recording system that's drawing rave reviews in the tech press, to an awards shortlist, the site's parent company stepped in and nixed the accolade. Because of a legal battle between CBS and Dish over the Hopper's ad-skipping technology, CBS laid down a ban: CNet won't be allowed to even review Dish products, much less give them awards.

Got to love modern day freedom of the press!

Science

Submission + - New Type of Clock Keeps Time by Weighing Atoms (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: A new type of clock keeps time by weighing the smallest bits of matter, physicists report. Compared with standard atomic clocks, which work differently, the new clock keeps lousy time. However, by connecting mass and time the technique could lead to a quantum-mechanical redefinition of the kilogram.
China

Submission + - Chinese Smartphone Invasion Begins (infoworld.com)

snydeq writes: "Tech giants Apple, Google, and Microsoft were no-shows at CES this week in Las Vegas, which worked out just fine for Chinese vendors looking to establish a name for themselves with U.S. consumers, InfoWorld reports. 'Telecom suppliers Huawei and ZTE, in particular, have set their sights on breaking into the U.S. market for smartphones and tablets. ... Whether these Chinese imports can take on the likes of Apple and Samsung remains to be seen, but as Wired quotes Jeff Lotman, the CEO of Global Icons, an agency that helps companies build and license their brands: "The thing that's amazing is these are huge companies, and they have a lot of power, but in the United States nobody has heard of them and they're having trouble gaining traction, but it's not impossible. Samsung was once known for making crappy, low-end phones and cheap TVs. Now they're seen as a top TV and smartphone brand."'"
Nintendo

Submission + - Nintendo Announces New Console: Wii U (reuters.com)

_xeno_ writes: Nintendo has announced the official name for what had been known as "Project Cafe:" the Wii U. It is an HD console, it remains backwards compatibility with the Wii (it's unclear if this includes GameCube software), and the controller does, in fact, have a touch screen on it. Nintendo demoed moving a game off the TV and play it solely on the Wii U controller.
Earth

Submission + - NASA finds family of habitable planets (networkworld.com) 1

coondoggie writes: NASA's star-gazing space telescope continues to find amazing proof that there are tons of habitable planets in space and we have only scratched the surface of what's out there. The space agency said today its Kepler space telescope spotted what it called its first Earth-size planet candidates and its first candidates in what it considers to be the habitable zone, a region where liquid water could exist on a planet's surface. Kepler also found six confirmed planets orbiting a sun-like star, Kepler-11. This is the largest group of transiting planets orbiting a single star yet discovered outside our solar system.
Android

Submission + - A Deeper Look Into Android 3.0

adeelarshad82 writes: Google is getting ready to show off Android 3.0 aka Honeycomb later today and it's definitely going to give iOS a run for its money. Google's new OS carries a completely overhauled user interface. Not only does the interface have deeper, darker colors to increase battery life but also the home screen now provides the ability to view multiple widget as well as the functionality of stacking items within a widget like pictures or videos. Along with the UI, Google has also improved the multitasking functionality. The existing method of accessing running or recently opened applications has been grown to display in-app screens instead of just the name of the app and an icon. One of the biggest differences between Honeycomb and other operating systems running on tablets is that, Honeycomb along with the apps running on it are optimzed for dual core processing. Natively, Android will run the garbage collector on one core and an app on another. However, the tools are there to utilize both cores for your app, and to benefit from the performance gains that will occur. To take a shot at Blackberry's market, Google has ensured that the tablet carries business features like password expiration and encrypted storage tools. Finally the OS adds support for legacy Bluetooth devices which is not available on most of the other tablets in the market today.
Apple

Submission + - Apple: Mac App Store hit 1M downloads in a day (networkworld.com)

alphadogg writes: Apple Friday said that more than 1 million apps were downloaded from the Mac App Store http://www.apple.com/mac/app-store/ on its first day.

The store launched Thursday at noon EST with more than 1,000 free and paid apps, and was available as part of Mac OS X 10.6.6 (a.k.a.,Snow Leopard) also released yesterday. The store leverages Apple’s iTunes app buying system that users are already so familiar with using for their iPhones and iPods, though requires a new app for access. Apple's own apps, along with those such as Angry Birds, have been among the most downloaded.

"We’re amazed at the incredible response the Mac App Store is getting," said Steve Jobs, Apple’s CEO. "Developers have done a great job bringing apps to the store and users are loving how easy and fun the Mac App Store is."

Not surprising: Hackers are already boasting http://www.informationweek.com/news/security/attacks/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=229000289&subSection=News about finding their way into the Mac App Store as well.

Submission + - College Students Lack Scientific Literacy

An anonymous reader writes: Most college students in the United States do not grasp the scientific basis of the carbon cycle – an essential skill in understanding the causes and consequences of climate change, according to research published in the January issue of BioScience. The study, whose authors include several current and former researchers from Michigan State University, calls for a new way of teaching – and, ultimately, comprehending – fundamental scientific principles such as the conservation of matter.

Submission + - The Snap-Together Data Center (datacenterknowledge.com)

1sockchuck writes: A new UK data center has applied the benefits of data center containers to a more sophisticated modular design that may prove more appealing to enterprise customers. The Merlin data center features factory-built modules that snap together to create server rooms of about 2,750 square feet that look like standard data centers. This building-block approach to containers is being advanced by companies like Blade Room and DataPod, which each offer custom modules for power, cooling and even man-traps.
Businesses

Submission + - Facebook's Revenues Leaked (reuters.com)

eldavojohn writes: Think that Goldman Sachs spent too much on Facebook with the $450 million investment? Well, a very wealthy customer of theirs decided to leak Facebook's financials today after receiving it over lunch: 'during the first nine months of 2010, Facebook generated $1.2 billion in revenue. Net income at the firm was $355 million. The financial statements were not audited and offered little detail about how Facebook generates it revenue, said the source, who did not want to be identified because he had signed a non-disclosure agreement.' Expanding this nine month period to a year yields $1.6 billion in revenue and under half a billion in income. Given that, should Facebook be valuated at $50 billion?

Submission + - RIAA Accounting: How Labels Avoid Paying Musicians (techdirt.com) 1

An anonymous reader writes: Last week, Slashdot posted Techdirt's story about "Hollywood Accounting" which showed how movies like Harry Potter still officially "lose" money with some simple accounting tricks. This week, Techdirt is taking on RIAA accounting, and showing why most musicians (even multi-platinum recording stars) may never see a dime from their album sales. The major labels basically give you a loan, but then demand the first 63% of any dollar you make, get to automatically increase the size of the "loan" by simply adding in all sorts of crazy expenses (did the exec bring in pizza at the recording session? that gets added on), and then tries to get the loan repaid out of what meager pittance they've left for you. Oh, and after all of that, the record label still owns the copyrights. The average musician on a major record deal "gets" about $23 per $1,000 made... and that $23 still never gets paid because it has to go to "recouping" the loan... even though the label is taking $630 out of that $1,000, and not counting it towards the advance. Remember all this the next time a record label says they're trying to protect musicians' revenue.
Patents

Submission + - Qualcomm to Pay Broadcom $891 Million in Settlemen (pcmag.com)

adeelarshad82 writes: "Wireless chip supplier Qualcomm Inc agreed to pay smaller rival Broadcom Corp $891 million over four years to settle long-standing and increasingly bitter legal battles over technology patents. The settlement will result in the dismissal of all litigation between the companies, including patent infringement claims Broadcom brought against Qualcomm at the International Trade Commission and a court in Santa Ana, California."
The Courts

Submission + - California ban on violent video games thowen out

ba_hiker writes: the SF Chronicle is reporting that the federal court of appeals has ruled that the California law against violent video games is unconstitutional.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/02/20/BAI9161PAJ.DTL&feed=rss.bayarea
saying the state was trying to interfere with free speech and had failed to show that simulated mayhem damages young people.
Data Storage

Submission + - SanDisk To Sell 120GB SSD for $250 (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: "SanDisk announced at CES that it's launching a third generation of its 2.5-in solid state disk drives, and it's positioning the technology as a replacement for aging hardware in corporations. While users may not be ready to rip and replace thousands of HDDs — copy over data and reinstall the OS — in order to extend the life of laptops, the drives seem to mark a tipping point in the pricing of flash drives, where the average joe can now afford the technology. The new notebook drives come in 60, 120 and 250GB capacities, and offer very respectable sustained read write rates of 200MB/sec and 140MB/sec, respectively. SanDisk also announced new 1.8-in SSDs for netbooks with 8GB, 16GB, 32GB and 64GB capacities."
Earth

Submission + - Are biofuels still economically feasible?

thefickler writes: With falling gas prices, and the end of capitalism as we know it (otherwise known as the credit crisis), the biofuels industry is not looking as viable as it once was. Indeed biofuel production has fallen well short of expectations, with biofuel companies closing down or reducing production capacity. It appears that the industry's only hope is government support.

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