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Submission + - Someone in North Korea is Hosting a Facebook Clone

Jason Koebler writes: Someone in North Korea appears to have created a Facebook clone, according to an internet analytics company that traced the site’s DNS to the notoriously isolated country. The social network is an off-the-shelf Facebook clone called dolphinPHP.
Dyn Analytics researcher Doug Madory said that “very few websites resolve to the North Korean address space, and this one does.”

Submission + - ISRO launches six Singaporean satellites

vasanth writes: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) successfully launched six Singapore satellites on Wednesday, the Indian space agency also tested the fourth stage of its PSLV rocket, the PSLV rocket is a four stage/engine rocket powered by solid and liquid fuel alternatively.

The test to restart the fourth stage of the PSLV rocket would help India in its future launches while attempting to launch multiple satellites in different orbits. Restarting a rocket engine soon after it is shut off is a critical technology that has to be mastered. Once a rocket engine is activated, then the heat generated is very high. The trick is to cool it down in the space and to restart it at a short gap.

With the latest, India has launched a total of 57 foreign satellites for 20 countries, the Wednesday’s launch earned India 26 million euros.

TeLEOS-1 the primary satellite is the first Singapore commercial earth observation satellite. It was launched into a low Earth orbit for "remote sensing" applications. The satellites will orbit around the equator and gather data that will benefit those in the equatorial region. The satellites was put into a 550 kms circular orbit inclined at 15 degrees to the equator.

The next three satellite launches using the Indian PSLV rocket would be navigation satellites, they would be followed by some multiple satellite launches for other countries.

Submission + - Dark matter found in Milky Way's core (sciencemag.org)

sciencehabit writes: A team of researchers that the measured speeds and calculated speeds of stars near the center of our galaxy don't agree. This suggests that there is dark matter in the Milky Way's core that is affecting the motion of these suns. The researchers hope their studies will help narrow down searches for the nature of dark matter as well as aid the understanding of galaxy formation.

, demonstrating that dark matter does indeed play a role in the inner galaxy. The researchers hope their studies will help narrow down searches for the nature of dark matter as well as aid the understanding of galaxy formation.

Submission + - Court releases DOJ memo justifying drone strike on US citizen

An anonymous reader writes: The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on Monday released a secret 2010 Justice Department memo justifying the killing of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S citizen killed in a drone strike in 2011. The court released the document as part of a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed by The New York Times and the American Civil Liberties Union to make the document public. Then-acting Assistant Attorney General David Barron, in the partially redacted 41-page memo, outlines the justification of the drone strike in Yemen to take out al-Awlaki, an alleged operational leader of al Qaeda.

Submission + - US releases memo justifying drone strike on American citizen (theverge.com) 1

schwit1 writes: Under orders from a US appeals court, the Obama administration has released a memo justifying the killing of American citizens with a targeted "drone strike." The memo presents a case for killing Anwar al-Awlaki, an al-Qaeda propagandist who was killed in Yemen in 2011. The strike on al-Awlaki has been widely debated since then, especially after a separate attack inadvertently killed al-Awlaki's 16-year-old son Abdulrahman. Now, thanks to a Freedom of Information Act request made by the ACLU and others, it's possible to read both the court's reasoning and the 30-page legal debate on whether he and others could be killed without due process under the CIA's drone program.

Submission + - Teacher Goes Back To Classroom After Being Removed For Science Fair Project

As_I_Please writes: In a followup to a previous story, Greg Schiller, a high school biology and psychology teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District, returned to his classroom this past Monday after two months of suspension. The suspension came after complaints that two of his students built allegedly dangerous science fair projects: a pneumatic marshmallow launcher and a coil gun capable of launching a metal projectile several feet.

In addition to students being deprived of a qualified teacher for two months with just a week before AP exams, the school's fencing team was without a coach and could not compete in competitions, and the teacher's union was without their representative during contract negotiations.

The school district has not announced whether it will pursue any other disciplinary action.

Submission + - AMD Launches Radeon R7 260X, Radeon R9 270X, and Radeon R9 280X (hothardware.com)

MojoKid writes: AMD officially launched their Radeon R7 and R9 series graphics cards today, with three new midrange to high end boards. The Radeon R9 280X is built around AMD’s Tahiti GPU, which also powers the Radeon HD 7970. The R9 270X features the same GPU core as the Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition and the Radeon R7 260X is powered by AMD’s Bonaire GPU, which first arrived on the Radeon HD 7790. These new cards, however, have been tweaked and enhanced in a number of ways. The Radeon R7 260X sports higher engine and memory clocks than the HD 7790 and 260X’s default memory configuration is 2GB as well. The R9 270X’s clocks have been goosed up as well with a GPU clock that peaks at 1.05GHz and its memory clock has been increased to an effective 5.6Gbps. The Radeon R9 270X offers slightly higher compute performance but much more memory bandwidth--179.2GB/s vs. 153.6GB/s to be exact. Finally, the Radeon R9 280X isn’t clocked higher than AMD’s current flagship Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition. In fact, the R9 280X has a slightly lower peak engine clock, though memory bandwidth is similar. All told, AMD's new Radeons offer competitive performance to NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost, GeForce GTX 760 and GeForce GTX 770 cards but at significantly better price points.

Submission + - Pluto's 'Thick' Air Isn't Going Anywhere (discovery.com)

astroengine writes: When the proposition for NASA's New Horizons mission to Pluto was put forward, there was an air of urgency. The dwarf planet is moving away from the Sun in its eccentric orbit, so astronomers were concerned that the Pluonian atmosphere would freeze out and collapse onto the surface as fresh nitrogen-methane snow before they could get a spacecraft out there to observe it. But according to new research [arXiv], it appears there's little risk of a Pluto air freeze-out. From recent occultation measurements, it appears the atmosphere is becoming denser and more buoyant, meaning it will remain as an atmosphere all (Pluto) year 'round — 248 Earth years long.

Submission + - Fukushima nuclear worker accidentally toggles OFF cooling pumps @ #4 1

An anonymous reader writes: A TEPCO employee carelessly pressed a button shutting off cooling pumps that serve the spent fuel pool in reactor #4 — thankfully a backup kicked in before any critical consequences resulted. The question remains just how vulnerable to simple mistakes (such as a single button push) are these spent fuel pools, filled nearly to capacity as they are with over 12,000 spent fuel rods?

How probable is another major nuclear accident at the crippled Fukushima site?

Given this is one site out of hundreds, is human civilization gambling heavily on the "success" of such regulation cumulatively as these systems age and are tested in the real world?

Submission + - U.S. DOJ say they don't need warrants for e-mail, Facebook chats (cnet.com)

gannebraemorr writes: The U.S. Department of Justice and the FBI believe they don't need a search warrant to review Americans' e-mails, Facebook chats, Twitter direct messages, and other private files, internal documents reveal. Government documents obtained by the American Civil Liberties Union and provided to CNET show a split over electronic privacy rights within the Obama administration, with Justice Department prosecutors and investigators privately insisting they're not legally required to obtain search warrants for e-mail.

Submission + - Massive 17-Year Cicada Swarm Has Arrived on the East Coast

An anonymous reader writes: The swarm has officially arrived. After 17 years of lurking beneath the ground, cicadas are hatching and popping out of the dirt like six-legged daisies. Thousands of insects will infest yards all along the East Coast--so you'd better be ready. The brood, which is known as Magicicada Brood II, is emerging as the ground begins to thaw. They only begin to fight their way out of the dirt once the soil eight inches below the surface reaches a balmy 64 degrees.

Submission + - The Israel Lobby (youtube.com)

feynmanfan1 writes: "How much influence does Israel and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) have on U.S. foreign policy? See the analysis given by Colin Powell's former chief of staff and William and Mary professor Colonel Wilkerson in the VPRO Back-light documentary "The Israel Lobby." The documentary covers the book "The Israel Lobby and U.S. foreign Policy" by Harvard professor Stephen Walt and University of Chicago professor John Mearsheimer. AIPAC, the pro-Israel lobby has consistently been ranked as one of the top two most influential lobbies by congress, is it just me or is it messed up that a lobby representing a foreign country is arguably the most powerful lobby in the United States?"

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