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Submission + - Ad technology company claims ad blockers are "breaking the Internet" (telegraph.co.uk)

whoever57 writes: London, UK based ad technology company Oriel has published a claim that ad blockers break web applications in ways other than merely not displaying ads. They show examples such as airline sites that will not allow check-in because of the effects of an ad blocker. The original report is here. The CEO of Oriel is quoted saying that he discovered this accidentally when attempting to check into a flight, which raises the question: why would the CEO of an ad technology company use an ad blocker?

Submission + - Researcher Seeks Help Finding Developers of App Exposing 198,000 Users (csoonline.com)

itwbennett writes: Researcher Chris Vickery has previously discovered database misconfiguration issues leading to exposure of sensitive information on 1,700 kids whose parents used the uKnowKids.com monitoring service, user accounts of millions of Hello Kitty fans, millions of voter records, and personal information of millions of MacKeeper users, among others. Now, he is trying to find the owners of a database containing 190,000 records, including email addresses, usernames and hashed passwords, that is sitting open in the public. 'The exposed records are connected to an iPhone application called Kinotopic,' writes CSO Online's Steve Ragan. But Vickery has been unable to contact them. 'I have tried to get in touch with the Kinotopic developers in several ways. All were unsuccessful,' Vickery wrote in a blog post explaining the situation.

Submission + - How Amazon Shames Warehouse Workers for Alleged Theft (bloomberg.com)

Fudge Factor 3000 writes: Using Orwellian methods, Amazon has put up flatscreen TVs in its warehouses to discourage theft amongst its employees. These TVs show clips of alleged on-the-job thefts. To keep the thieves anonymous, they are masked by a silhouette stamped with the word "terminated" with the particulars of their theft also displayed. Theft is a serious concern for Amazon because of the low pay and high-turnover of their workers. The simpler solution may be to pay workers a satisfactory wage so that they are less likely to steal. However, most workers claim that these tactics are just to let them know that they are being watched. Sweatshops don't just exist in Asia, they are also present right here in the USA.
Technology

China Moving To Restrict Neodymium Supply 477

GuyFawkes writes with this quote from the Independent: "Britain and other Western countries risk running out of supplies of certain highly sought-after rare metals that are vital to a host of green technologies, amid growing evidence that China, which has a monopoly on global production, is set to choke off exports of valuable compounds. Failure to secure alternative long-term sources of rare earth elements (REEs) would affect the manufacturing and development of low-carbon technology, which relies on the unique properties of the 17 metals to mass-produce eco-friendly innovations such as wind turbines and low-energy light bulbs. China, whose mines account for 97 per cent of global supplies, is trying to ensure that all raw REE materials are processed within its borders. During the past seven years it has reduced by 40 per cent the amount of rare earths available for export."

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