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Puzzle: Adverbs that do not end in "ly"

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  • I thought of a few on my own like "now" and "soon." See here [reference.com] and here [uvcs.uvic.ca].
  • "very," and I've got a ton more, but some of my work is in the linguistics business, so I won't ruin it for others by posting a large list.
    • Whereas an adverb is a modifier for a verb, wouldn't "very" become an ad-adverb? (Or an adjecverb? :)
      • very [reference.com]:

        very: adv.

        For the same reason "always" is an adverb.

        I was always running.
        I was very tired.

        They're clearly adverbs in context, even though they certainly don't end in ly.

        I believe that approximately 90% of words which end in -ly are adverbs. Right now, I can't think of any words ending in ly which aren't, but I just woke up and am pretty tired. Anyone want to help me out?

        • For the same reason "always" is an adverb.

          I was always running.
          I was very tired.

          They're clearly adverbs in context, even though they certainly don't end in ly.


          I don't understand. And adverb describes a verb. "Always" is not a description of "tired", nor is "very". "Always" merely mentions *when* the verb happened. and, "very" is intensity. So, they should be similar to adverbs, yet not quite actual adverbs.

          Right now, I can't think of any words ending in ly which aren't

          Really? A wordly person such a
          • No, adverbs don't describe verbs. They modify the behavior of verbs.

            I was swimming quickly.
            I was very tired.
            I will always need more sleep than I can get.

            etc.

            And ally's a great example of a word ending in ly which isn't an adverb.

            • No, adverbs don't describe verbs. They modify the behavior of verbs.

              So that's my mistake. Oh well. English is stoopid. :-)
  • quite too And "daily" is a word that ends in "ly" that isn't always an adverb.
  • ... as in 'he goes fast' ?
    • I always correct people who say that, by telling them "fast" is not an adverb. :) Therefore, it is "He goes quickly".
      • I always correct people who say that, by telling them "fast" is not an adverb. :)

        It is, actually. Just not in that context.

        From Dictionary.com [reference.com]:

        adv.

        faster, fastest

        1. In a secure manner; tightly: hold fast.
        2. To a sound degree; deeply: fast asleep.
        3. In a rapid manner; quickly.
        4. In quick succession: New ideas followed fast.
        5. Ahead of the correct or expected time: a watch that runs fast.
        6. In a dissipated, immoderate way: living fast.
        7. Archaic. Close by; near.

        I did not remember it correctly - on

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