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Submission + - Google charging OEMs licensing fees for Play Store (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google has begun charging OEMs for access to its proprietary Play Store applications for Android though the reported amount is as low as 75c per device. Between charging OEMs for Google Play apps, showing ads within these apps (Search, Maps and GMail) and profiling users with the data it collects this does show that Google is willing to leverage their stranglehold on the mobile market to control and monetize wherever it can. Add that these proprietary applications and the proprietary Google Play Services are the primary areas for Android innovation and development and you end up with an operating system that is less and less "free" in the freedom and cost senses of the word.

Submission + - Jury: Newegg infringes Spangenberg patent, must pay $2.3 million (arstechnica.com) 1

qwerdf writes: Newegg, an online retailer that has made a name for itself fighting the non-practicing patent holders sometimes called "patent trolls," sits on the losing end of a lawsuit tonight. An eight-person jury came back shortly after 7:00pm and found that the company infringed all four asserted claims of a patent owned by TQP Development, a company owned by patent enforcement expert Erich Spangenberg.
Security

Submission + - PayPal security holes expose customer card data, personal details (scmagazine.com.au)

mask.of.sanity writes: Dangerous website flaws have been discovered in PayPal that grant attackers access to customer credit card data, account balances and purchase histories.

The holes still exist. One was publicly disclosed after a failed effort in July to responsibly disclose them under PayPal's bug bounty program.

PayPal is working to close the holes.

Apple

Submission + - User Tracking Back on iOS6 (sophos.com)

connor4312 writes: Apple got caught with its hand in the cookie jar when privacy experts protested the use of a universal device identifier, or UDID, to track the online preferences of iPhone and iPad users. Enough is enough, right? Well, maybe not. It looks like device tracking is back with iOS 6, courtesy of a new tracking technology: IDFA, or identifier for advertisers.
Software

Submission + - Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal available today (geek.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The six month cycle that Canonical adheres to for Ubuntu releases has come around again today. Ubuntu 12.10 ‘Quantal Quetzal‘ has been released. There's a whole range of new features and updates, but here's the most important:

- WebApps — treats online services as if they are desktop apps (Gmail, Twitter, Facebook)
- Online Services — control logins to all your services from a single window and get them integrated into search results (e.g. GDocs for file searches)
- Dash Preview — right click any icon, get a detailed preview of what it is
- Linux kernel 3.5.4, GNOME 3.6, Nautilus 3.4, latest Unity
- No more Unity 2D, fallback is the Gallium llvmpipe software rasterizer
- Default apps (Firefox 16.01, Thunderbird 16.01, LibreOffice 3.6.2, Totem, Shotwell, Rythmbox)
- Full disc encryption available during install
- Single, 800MB distribution for all architectures

Download should appear today at some point.

Apple

Submission + - Apple blocks Dropbox-based apps (pcpro.co.uk)

Barence writes: "Apple is rejecting apps that use the new Dropbox SDK because they inadvertently allow users to buy extra online storage without Apple taking a cut.

Online storage service Dropbox is commonly used by iOS developers as a way of allowing users to share files created within their apps to other devices.

Dropbox's latest SDK has incurred the wrath of Apple, because users who don't have the Dropbox app installed on their iPhone/iPad are instead pushed to Dropbox's website via the Safari browser. Here, they can click a link to the desktop version of the service, which allows them to buy extra Dropbox storage without Apple taking its usual 30% cut.

"Apple should reject all web browser apps because they can take you to a page that lets you purchase stuff," writes one infuriated developer. "Go Apple! Crack down on all commerce!""

Spam

Submission + - California Appeals Court Rules that Anonymous Domain Name Service Is Illegal. (wordpress.com) 1

www.sorehands.com writes: "Last week, a California Court of Appeals upheld the trial court decision awarding Dan Balsam $7,000.00 in damages and $81,900 in attorney fees and costs.

The court found that the Defendants use of Godaddy's Domains by Proxy service for the domain names in the headers was sufficient to make the headers deceptive where there was no other identifier in the from lines to identify Trancos as the sender was illegal as a matter of law. In a past case, I successfully argued that these types of domain name anonymity service makes the provider of the service liable as the owner of the domain name.

This case also endorsed the ruling in Hypertouch v. Valueclick, which found that the California law is not preempted by the I-CAN-SPAM Act."

Privacy

Submission + - PayPal Revises Privacy Policy, User Agreement Policy 1

wiedzmin writes: PayPal announced that they are following Google's suit in changing of both its privacy and user agreement policies, adding tweaks to its customer identification program and the way they collect and store its customers’ personal information. The changes will take effect on April 1st and will include the use of session cookies, persistent cookies, flash cookies and pixel tags for user tracking. Additionally, PayPal will reserve the right to limit, suspend or outright cancel any account if date of birth, taxpayer identification number, driver’s license or “other identifying documents” are not provided upon request, for "account verification" purposes. Other ridiculous provisions include their right to demand IRS form 1099-K from customers who receive more that 200 payments a year, and employ all tracking mechanisms on their mobile applications across all platforms.
Classic Games (Games)

Lost Online Games From the Pre-Web Era 186

harrymcc writes "Long before the Web came along, people were playing online games — on BBSes, on services such as Prodigy and CompuServe, and elsewhere. Gaming historian Benj Edwards has rounded up a dozen RPGs, MUDs, and other fascinating curiosities from the 1970s, 1980s, and early 1990s — and the cool part is: they're all playable on the Web today." What old games were good enough for you to watch them scroll by on your 300 baud modem?
Social Networks

Why the Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted 305

An anonymous reader writes "Social media is ill-suited to promoting real social change, argues Malcolm Gladwell in this article from The New Yorker magazine. He deftly debunks conventional wisdom surrounding the impact of Twitter, Facebook and other social media in driving systemic social change, comparing them to the organizational strategies of the 1960s civil rights movement. For example, the Montgomery bus boycott, he argues, was successful because it was driven by the disciplined and hierarchically organized NAACP. In contrast, a loose, social-media style network wouldn't have sustained the year long campaign. He concludes that social media promote social 'weak ties' which are not strong enough to motivate people to take big risks, such as imprisonment or attack, for social change."
Image

UK Teen Banned From US Over Obscene Obama Email Screenshot-sm 555

British teenager Luke Angel has been banned from the US for sending an email to the White House calling President Obama an obscenity. The 17-year-old says he was drunk when he sent the mail and doesn't understand what the big deal is. "I don't remember exactly what I wrote as I was drunk. But I think I called Barack Obama a p***k. It was silly -- the sort of thing you do when you're a teenager and have had a few," he said. The FBI contacted local police who in turn confronted Luke and let him know that the US Department of Homeland Security didn't think his email was funny. "The police came and took my picture and told me I was banned from America forever. I don't really care but my parents aren't very happy," Angel said.
Privacy

Submission + - Facebook data harvesting is quite easy (skullsecurity.org)

An anonymous reader writes: A Security consultant made a simple proof of concept script that gathered data of over 100 million users from Facebook http://www.skullsecurity.org/blog/?p=887 ( names and their profile ID ) , This with enough bandwidth ( say a botnet ) could be made to get friends and friends of friends information, public profile data, Among others and was published too in a BBC article at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-10796584. The torrent with the data is freely available for download.

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