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United Kingdom

Submission + - Light pollution 'saturates' UK's night skies (

An anonymous reader writes: Half of the UK's population cannot see many stars because the night skies are "saturated" with light pollution, campaigners have warned. Study participants were instructed to pick a clear night to count the number of stars in the constellation of Orion. Fewer than 1 in 10 said they could see between 21 and 30 stars, and just 2% of people had truly dark skies, seeing 31 or more stars. Emma Marrington, a rural policy campaigner for the CPRE, says: "...this isn't just about a spectacular view of the stars; light pollution can also disrupt wildlife and affect people's sleeping patterns."

Submission + - Niceness May Largely Be Determined by DNA

An anonymous reader writes: Human kindness has traditionally been regarded as something people learn through experience, but scientists have discovered that some people are actually born with genes that predispose them towards niceness. Past research found that levels of oxytocin and vasopressin hormones influence how people treat one another, especially in close relationships.

Submission + - Why humans have pretty much stopped evolving ( 2

Kidipede writes: "Never thought of this before, but Ian Tattersall explains that organisms can evolve quickly only in small isolated groups with a limited gene pool, so that a mutation can really take hold. In huge gene pools like modern cities, mutations are quickly muted by the dominance of the older DNA and evolutionary change becomes nearly impossible. It's not the main point of the story, but it's a good point."

Submission + - Why is /. turning into a pile of crap? Where do we go next? (

An anonymous reader writes: Recently the headlines and summaries have been so far of base that it is now quite imaginable that /. will quickly lose its following. Is /. intentionally trying to kill itself? This AC, and an 11 year follower of /. would like to ask the community: where are we all heading once the exodus kicks off? Is there an adequate replacement for /. ?

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