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Submission + - AT&T offers LTE just to cap users who use it (xda-developers.com) 1

realized writes: We have all heard of soft caps put on by cell phone carriers. AT&T, Verizon and others alike have all said that they will (and have already started to), “throttle” users in the top 5% of data usage. With LTE starting to be deployed to multiple markets now this seems to be more of a problem. AT&T and Verizon are selling LTE phones and once users realize they can watch movies, download games, etc without lag on the new technology, are overnight getting capped. At LTE Speeds of 30-50MB/sec it’s very easy to hit the “soft cap” in place. The cap, according to some XDA members, seems to be anywhere from 4gb to 8gb/month. What is the point of offering LTE if you aren’t able to handle the small percentage of users that have LTE devices in those areas? Is this a bandwidth problem or a licensing problem with the wireless spectrum? Is 4, 6, or even 10 gb/month really abuse?
Medicine

Researchers Zero In On Protein That Destroys HIV 216

Julie188 writes with this excerpt from a Loyola University news release: "Using a $225,000 microscope, researchers have identified the key components of a protein called TRIM5a that destroys HIV in rhesus monkeys. The finding could lead to new TRIM5a-based treatments that would knock out HIV in humans, said senior researcher Edward M. Campbell, PhD, of Loyola University Health System."
Piracy

Uwe Boll, Other Filmmakers Sue Thousands of Movie Pirates 284

linzeal writes "Directors whose films have done poorly at the box office are increasingly being solicited by high-powered law firms to file lawsuits with offers of settlement. This practice, which the EFF has been calling extortive and 'mafia-like', has resulted in courts starting to rule in favor of the consumer, and in some cases throwing out the lawsuits. This is all fine and dandy, however, when you are considered the world's worst director and you largely finance films through your own holding company. At that point, the rhetoric and ridicule gets ratcheted up rather quickly."

Comment Re: here$ the new$ (Score 2, Interesting) 127

Did you also think that food stores pay off the stealing users from their own pockets, and don't increase prices to get it back from users?

A food store, like any other store, sets the price of the food it sells to the point that brings it the most profit. Rising the price will decrease, not increase, profits. So yes, it pays for any stolen items out of its own pockets, since it has no other options.

I wish people stopped perpetuating the PR-invented myth that companies are somehow impervious to fines because they can simply get more money from their customers to cover it. They can't, because if they could, they'd already be doing so. Any company blaming a price increase to fines, theft or anything like that is flat out lying.

Submission + - CRIA Faces $60 Billion Law Suite

jvillain writes: The Canadian Recording Industry Association faces a law suite for 60 Billion dollars for wilful infringement.

These numbers may sound outrageous, yet they are based on the same rules that led the recording industry to claim a single file sharer is liable for millions in damages.

Since these exact same companies are currently in the middle of trying to force the Canadian Government to bring in a DMCA for Canada it will be interesting to see how they try to spin this. I guess they were right after all about flagrant copy right issues happening in Canada.

Submission + - Canadian record labels face copyright charges. (thestar.com) 1

codesmith.ca writes: From Michael Geist's Blog. It seems the estate of Chet Baker filed a lawsuit back in October '08 against several major record labels in Canada for copyright infringement. To whit: using his work on compilation CD's and not getting permission beforehand, and not paying royalties for the use. It seems the companies can put the use of the recording on a 'we'll get around to it' list and (maybe) settle up later.

It's reported that there's better than $50 million (CDN) already owning to all artists on the list, but with the law involved, that value could be as high as $60 billion. (emphasis mine) due to the $20000 per song infringement charges.

To quote one commentor: That is some seriously delicious irony on this dreary Monday morning

Security

Botnets As "eWMDs" 172

John Kelly writes "The current issue of Policy Review has a paper by an American computer scientist and the recent Permanent Undersecretary of Defense for Estonia. Drawing on the Estonian cyber attacks a year and a half ago, as well as other recent examples, they argue that botnets are the major problem. They propose that botnets should be designated as 'eWMDs' — electronic weapons of mass destruction. The paper also proposes a list of reforms that would help to limit the scale and impact of future botnet attacks, beginning with defining and outlawing spam, internationally." Many of the proposed solutions are common-sensical and won't be news to this audience, but it is interesting to see the botnet threat painted in such stark terms for readers of the Hoover Institution's Policy Review. For a more comprehensive overview of cyber-security threats, listen to NPR's interview with security experts on the occasion of the release of a new report, "Securing Cyberspace for the 44th Presidency," which recommends creating a cyber-security czar reporting to the President.

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