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Submission + - Minority Report is now real: AEG sues before crime (hollywoodreporter.com)

Caledfwlch writes: In a Minority Reportesque situation AEG, following a similar situation from the Bravado International Group of UMG, was sued concert bootleggers before they bootleg. "Just because the Mile High Music Festival this weekend in Denver hasn't happened yet, and just because the bootleggers haven't yet set up shop, doesn't mean that hundreds of individuals haven't already been sued", all as John and Jane Does with names to be filled in later. They asked "a federal court in Colorado to order the US Marshal, local and state police, off duty officers, and AEG agents to seize and impound bootlegged merchandise."

Submission + - Study that 99.7% of torrents are "illegal" flawed (torrentfreak.com) 1

Caledfwlch writes: techdirt, and others, point to an analysis by TorrentFreak of the recent report by Internet Commerce Security Laboratory (ICSL) of Australia that only 0.3% of torrents contain legal content. One of the data points was that the movie The Incredible Hulk was the number one seeded torrent "the fact that the release is nearly two years old should have sounded some alarm bells. It appears that the researchers have pulled data from a bogus tracker, and it wouldn’t be a big surprise if all the torrents in their top 10 are actually fake.". The study had been widely picked up a couple of days ago by the media, here, at ArsTechnica, and others.
Patents

Submission + - US BPAI: abstract software code is not patentable (groklaw.net)

Caledfwlch writes: Seems like sanity may be trying to prevail from the Bilski decision. The US Board of Patents Appeals and Interferences (BPAI) has rejected a software patent application from HP saying that "abstract software code" is not patentable, stating "The unpatentability of abstract ideas was confirmed by the U.S. Supreme Court in Bilski v. Kappos"

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