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Comment Re:Ummmm..... (Score 1) 366

The claim is that if we exist in a reality that can be simulated accurately, it is pure hubris to assume that we are the top tier attempting to perform such a simulation.

I think it's funny how you people call it "hubris" whenever other people stay within the limits of what they know. You sound just like the people who are sure there are intelligent aliens on other planets somewhere out in the mind-boggling vastness of the universe. The rest of us say "I don't know," but you say you know (despite utter lack of evidence) and accuse us of hubris.

I don't think that word means what you think it means.

Comment Re:Good (Score 2) 516

We need a government we can trust.

Voters say otherwise. I'm hearing that over half of voters distrust Trump and over half distrusted Clinton too. Didn't these two get about 97% of the vote?

We don't need government we trust; in fact, we prefer government that we think is constantly lying to us. If you don't seem dishonest, we don't want you.

Comment Re:I am curious if people think this is good or ba (Score 2) 164

what's the problem with setting the same rules for everybody ????

People don't all want the same things. Non-uniform rules means they don't have to pretend to agree on things they don't agree on. Diversity is good; tyranny is bad.

I want the same rules for everybody on our planet.

Let me guess: do you want their values forcefully imposed on you, or your values forcefully imposed on them?

Comment Re:I used to think he seemed reasonable (Score 2) 91

The alternative to providing a DRM option in the web standard is Flash/Silverlight, or something similar, can you explain how what he endorsed is any worse?

That is one of the alternatives.

Another alternative, which is even better, is in HTML5 right now: the audio and video tags. No DRM, pure functionality. 100% win. Don't use DRM, and your content gets to comply with standards, so you have the largest customer base possible. That maximizes revenue. Every deviation from this approach, should be viewed in terms of how much revenue you trade away, exchange for .. uh .. whatever-the-fuck it is, that media producers get by reducing the number of customers who can buy their product.

Yet another alternative approach would be to have an actual DRM standard, such as rot13. Since everyone would be able to implement it and it wouldn't require any weird hardware or proprietary trade secrets, you'd get maximum compatibility across all platforms and devices; it'd be just as good as not having DRM at all. Everyone wins. Had he endorsed this compromise, people wouldn't be flaming him.

Comment Re:You can't have it both ways. (Score 1) 91

However, the internet has shown that this does not happen.

Only because we're not doing it right. The problem with using billions of monkeys, is that you're required to keep the monkeys isolated from one another, in order to have their typing remain random. If the monkeys are able to read one another's typing, they will form patterns together. They'll learn, invent culture (i.e. spread memes), trade typing duties for sexual favors, cheat by photocopying previously-typed pages, etc. All these things remove much of the entropy needed to eventually recreate Shakespeare. They start working on problems of their own, seperate from the Recreate Shakespeare project. Or even if they remain loyal to the project's goals, the learning will guide them into local optima, when what we need them to do is continue to type randomly, all in parallel.

This is why I propose using simulated virtual monkeys, each in their own sandbox. The monkeys need to remain isolated and free of anything which might incentivize non-random typing. With simulated monkeys, we can do this!

(BTW, it would only be fair to point out that a competing research team claims they have found a faster and more efficient means of recreating the works of Shakespeare, using a key-reference system where using the title of the work, it is looked up in a memory bank and read out. This all sounds too complated to me, though, so I'm sticking with the simulated monkeys.)

Comment new politics (Score 2) 397

Good thing we won't see the new inflation rate for a several more months, and pollution's latency has always been a classic.

Maybe this is good idea for a political platform: don't worry about conservative/liberal principles; just look for fast indicators that you can increase at the expense of slow ones. Right and left will become obsolete labels, and debates will be between short-termers and long-termers.

Comment Try our new unit of measure (Score 1) 167

While that number may seem high, consider that it costs (more or less) $9.99 a month to stream tens of thousands of songs, as opposed to dropping $10-15 on a single album to own it, either physically or digitally.

I think I see the problem here, and might know just what you need. Here at Cajun Hell Enterprises, we have developed a proprietary unit of measure which fits your case perfectly.

We call it "Dollar" (TM). Instead of counting arbitrary "units" and then defining various other sub-unit types as being equivalent to a fraction of a unit in proportion to their revenue, we just measure the revenue itself. We can them combine measurements of these dollars from various sources, into a total for the time period in question, using a special arithmetic operator developed just for this task.

If you think you already have Dollars, please contact our sales department.

Comment Re:Bandaid (Score 1) 469

The root problem is TANSTAAFL. Everyone (quite reasonably and understandably) wants more for less. But as a whole, or on average, they can't have it.

Realtime traffic databases offer a short-term advantage, where you can come out ahead . . . until enough people know about it, until those who bear the costs of the new traffic patterns react, etc. Like the traffic itself, lunch seeks an equilibrium, and it ain't free.

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