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Comment Re: Now we have investment spam as news (Score 1) 253

"He's a firm believer in the underlying tech and the blockchain as a source of value in itself"

Hm, therein lies perhaps some of the difference between him and me. I was enamoured with the tech early but when I saw the problem of ever increasing blockchain sizes and the pretty much unsustainable quantity of bytes that needs to be shuffled around once the number of transactions increases to anything even approaching a globally accepted scale, and when I wrote a white paper proposing some mechanisms for mitigating this that went completely ignored by the bitcoin developers, I decided that the whole thing, while a great idea in principle, was going to collapse under the weight of the mostly intractible problem of bandwidth.

I still think it's not likely to succeed in the long term, but man was it a clever idea.

Comment Re: Now we have investment spam as news (Score 1) 253

How brave was he in holding onto the bitcoins? I bought mine at $30 but got too nervous when they hit $600 and cashed out. I only had about three so it's not like it was a huge windfall. But if I had 1000 bought at 25 cents apiece ... man I am not sure I would have had the guts to stay in past even $10.

Comment Re:I think you're mistaken about gold (Score 1) 253

What do you say to the fundamental criticism that deflation decreases incentive to work? If I have a huge nugget of gold, there is little or no more being mined out of the ground, and the size of the economy is increasing, then effectively all I will need to do to live comfortably is shave off smaller and smaller pieces of gold each year to pay for my needs.

Deflation seems like it helps people who have already accumulated wealth. Inflation seems like it helps people who have not accumulated wealth.

I'm in preference of the latter.

Comment Re:I didn't follow you logic... (Score 2) 414

I don't really have a position on this debate, but this is patently false:

"For the record, Christianity has an equally terrifying concept: That God punishes the faithful for the sins of the unfaithful, thus making the sinner an existent threat to the Christian (and indeed, him/herself and all mankind). We see this in Sodom & Gomorrah and the Floods."

I'm not a Christian nor a Muslim, but there is no way that God punishing sinners is as terrifying a concept as men believing they are commanded by God to punish sinners.

In the former case, the worst that can happen is that we attribute natural disasters to God's will.

In the latter case, we have people blowing themselves up to kill other people.

There is a real difference there.

Comment Re:Hateful posts on Slashdot (or elsewhere) (Score 1) 2837

That was a really great read, thanks.

Although I didn't like the outcome of this election, and in fact felt quite sick inside for a while, I have come to accept it and I've decided to try to nurture some hope that things won't be as bad as I thought they would be.

The responses to this particular Slashdot article are probably the best and most interesting I've ever read on Slashdot. And I've been here a *long* *time*.

Comment Re:Not me (Score 2) 535

I can fix everything that comes my way in Linux with enough time and effort. I can go all the way down to modifying kernel source and recompiling if necessary.

The thing is, I don't want to spend my time doing that. There was a time in the 90's when that was fun because it was a liberating feeling of having a level of control not afforded by other operating systems. But pretty quickly, it became a chore, when I had to keep fixing the same sorts of problems over and over again.

I agree that not being able to fix low level problems is a drawback of Windows and Mac OS X; however; major problems occur (on Mac OS X at least, Windows definitely is still quite a bit flakier) so rarely that the tradeoff is very, very worth it ... for me.

Comment Re:Not me (Score 1) 535

I agree with you, Windows 10 is an abomination. It forces me to reboot on its schedule when it has updates to perform (it's literally told me "I'm going to reboot your computer in 1 hour to install updates), and I've missed/not noticed dialogs and had the thing just reboot itself on my while I was in the middle of work, which was lost. It also spends a significant part of my network bandwidth continuously loading updates.

I'd say every three or four reboots, it goes into a lengthy update process that takes minutes.

An operating system that forcefully reboots itself, without user control, and that takes minutes to boot up a significant percentage of the time, is in my opinion, fundamentally broken. I loathe Windows 10. I only use it because it's required on my VR PC at the moment, and probably always will be, because let's face it, Apple doesn't do a good job keeping up with high end graphics hardware (at a reasonable price), and Linux is completely hopeless when it comes to being an OS for the masses.

Comment Not me (Score 5, Informative) 535

So I've been a Linux user since 1994, and it's been my primary development environment, and provided me a job, for 20+ years now, and for that I'm very thankful. I love developing on Linux.

That being said, I owned a succession of Linux laptops that never worked entirely correctly before I got my retina macbook pro in 2012. I'd say 25% of system updates to my Linux distro would break something, maybe a wireless driver would get flaky, maybe X11 would crap out in some new or unusual way, maybe the battery life would be bad because some kind of battery optimization would stop working. There were ALWAYS problems, it was like living with a finicky collector's automobile that you're spending as much time tinkering with to keep it running as you are actually driving it. A major source of problems with Linux was always sleep and hibernate modes, which were clunky to engage, slow to suspend and resume, and, if they worked, almost always had caveats (I don't know how many scripts I wrote that would switch to a virtual console away from X before suspend and then back again after resume, because X would so often just die if you suspended while it controlled the display).

Maybe things have improved, but I doubt it. On the other hand, this 2012 macbook pro has been a complete pleasure to use. EVERYTHING works correctly, I have never had a single problem of any kind with it. Tons of little details all work seamlessly together. I can close the lid and the thing sleeps, open it, and it wakes up. Never had a graphics problem or a driver problem of any kind.

Of course I know this is because the deck is stacked in favor of Apple, who own the entire stack from hardware through operating system and up through most software. But I don't care. Because it just works, and works so well.

That being said, I am very disappointed with the newest iteration of the macbook pro and I don't think I'll be buying one despite having assumed that I would, leading up to the actual announcement. I will just chug along with this 2012 rMBP. I will NOT switch back to Linux. I'll take a correctly functioning slower and older laptop over a fast and new machine filled with quirks and bugs.

Comment Re:I don't like my Tesla Model X (Score 1) 144

What kind of stupidity does it take to not be able to tell the difference between humor and trolling? Who are the idiots on this site nowadays that downvote posts as "troll" just because they are too dumb to understand or appreciate them, or just don't agree with them?

Yeah I'm an old timer. I don't come to this site that often any more. But even more troubling than the slide to mediocrity of the story editing and selection (which happened in the mid-2000's by the way, and unfortunately never improved), is the increasing stupidity of the Slashdot readership. Or perhaps it's really just a part of the overall trend of this new generation not being able to handle any viewpoint they don't agree with without furious downvoting.

Comment Re: Product placement (Score 0) 236

It may be more entertaining than men's soccer, if you're into soccer (I'm not), but it's hard for me to get past the fact that the best women's teams in the world (the ones that win the world cups and olympics and such) can be easily beaten by their own national under-17 boy's teams.

I don't know why exactly, but knowing that the people I am watching are only competitive in the sport because of gender segregation, takes some of the excitement away for me.

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...though his invention worked superbly -- his theory was a crock of sewage from beginning to end. -- Vernor Vinge, "The Peace War"

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