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Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Which dataplan provider to use when traveling in the USA

An anonymous reader writes: I am visiting USA 3-4 times a year and I need a data service. I also need to keep my cell phone number, so swapping the SIM card in my phone is not an option. I have bought those 19.95$ phones in Best-Buy to get a local number, but those were voice only. So I have been thinking about getting a MiFi hotspot.

I have been looking at pre-paid plans from Verizon(only 700 LTE band for their pre-paid hotspot), AT&T, T-Mobile etc. perhaps to put in a MiFi hotspot or buy a hotspot from a provider, but have no idea which one to use, their reputation, real life coverage etc. It is clear that all data plans in the USA are really expensive, I get 100GB monthly traffic with my Scandinavian provider for the same price as 6-8 GB montly in the US, which I guess could be a problem with our Apple phones as they do not recognize a metered WiFi hotspot. But that is another issue.
I travel all over but most of the time outside the big cities and my experience from roaming with my own phone and the cheap local phone so far tells me that coverage fluctuates wildly depending on the operator.

Submission + - TV streaming in Scandinavia gearing up and hbo goes streaming only (variety.com)

An anonymous reader writes: For years people outside the US have been denied access to services such as Netflix, Hulu, HBO.
Getting access to fx. Netflix using VPN services has been so popular that most (print)newspapers and tech sites in denmark have had detailed articles about how to to get it working.

Now Netflix and HBO has announced their arrival in Scandinavia too so the local services with very limited content might finally get proper competition.
Unlike the US, HBO delivers streaming without the need for a cable subscription. Netflix CEO Reed Hastings made light of the competition in a post on his Facebook page: "Excited to see HBO join us in offering standalone streaming service in Scandinavia...what about the USA?"

Now we cross our fingers and hope we get the full package and not just limited access although it seems unlikely they will be able to work that into their current business model.


Submission + - Copyright trolls file copyright claims for videos made in iMovie (raoulpop.com)

An anonymous reader writes: I had a copyright claim on some of my youtube videos.
Now my videos were short trailers made using iMovie which featured my co-workers and the standard music from the iMovie templates.
These movie were something i made as a part of a teambuilding event so they are of really limited interest to other people.
So i started googleing to see if others have had the same problem and found that others have had the same problem.
I found what seems to be the best explanation to what happens here.

Submission + - Swedish teleco firms looking into block VoIP claiming losses in earnings (google.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Telia, a Swedish telecommunications company is now looking into possible solutions to block free VoIP services like Skype and Vibr, claiming the losses are beginning to take its toll on the total earnings. Critics are saying the companies have wrongly implemented outdated pricing models, the act could threaten net transparency and independance. In a new report from the EU body of European phone market, [url=http://www.erg.eu.int/whatsnew/index_en.htm]Berec[/url] , shows that more and more telecommunications companies will block their subscribers from using free services. The European Commission is investigating whether it is possible to prohibit the blocking of legal services online. (© AP)

Submission + - Microsoft SkyDrive 'Confuses Naked With Nude', Ar (bernardevans.co.uk)

Bender Unit 22 writes: Microsoft has an image police — but an arrest they have made may be mistaken. A blogger using its SkyDrive cloud storage service says it froze his account when it confused a famous work of art with pornography.
This has happened for some time as this (German) article (German) shows.
A small gallery with examples (some NSFW)


Submission + - Android Malware May Have Infected 5 Million Users (computerworld.com)

bonch writes: A massive Android malware campaign may be responsible for duping as many as 5 million users into downloading the Android.Counterclan infection from the Google Android Market. The trojan collects the user's personal information, modifies the home page, and displays unwanted advertisements. It is packaged in 13 different applications, some of which have been on the store for at least a month. Several of the malicious apps are still available on the Android Market as of 3 P.M. ET. Symantec has posted the full list of infected applications.

Submission + - New privacy laws could boost EU cloud industry (techworld.com)

sweetpea86 writes: Cloud providers based in the European market could turn the fear, uncertainty and doubt around data protection and the US Patriot Act to their advantage, according to Andy Burton, chairman of the Cloud Industry Forum. The only way that European companies can absolutely guarantee that their data doesn’t end up in the hands of US authorities is by choosing a provider that not only has a data centre within their jurisdiction, but is also owned by an organisation based in that jurisdiction.

Apple Releases IOS 4.3 Beta To Developers 101

m2pc writes "Apple has just released iOS 4.3 beta to developers. New features include: Developer access to AirPlay API, Four and Five-finger gestures, and the return of the hardware orientation lock for iPad, a feature that upset many when Apple suddenly removed this feature with no software option to re-enable it. Also interesting to note is the lack of mention of the Mobile Hotspot feature rumored to be included in 4.3 for all iOS devices by the Verizon announcement yesterday."

Submission + - OpenBSD less secure than is commonly thought?

An anonymous reader writes: From an interesting DistroWatch article: OpenBSD is considered one of the most secure operating systems on the market, with all its code scrutinised for potential flaws and vulnerabilities. Or at least that's what the developers like to tell us. But can we really trust it? In an article entitled "The insecurity of OpenBSD", a blogger raises some doubts and highlights some of the possible problems with OpenBSD. The argument is largely in favor of the MAC controls being required to be secure, and provides a different perspective than has been presented in the past. A well-researched and referenced article that exposes some of the claims made by OpenBSD proponents. It is followed by over 100 comments which are also worth reading. Original source here

Submission + - Phone and Text bans on drivers shown ineffective

shmG writes: As state legislators across the United States enact laws that ban phoning and texting while driving, a new study is showing no reductions in crashes after hand-held phone bans take effect.

Comparing insurance claims for crash damage in 4 US jurisdictions before and after such bans, The Highway Loss Data Institute (HLDI) researchers find claim rates are comparable with nearby jurisdictions without such bans.

Submission + - Nav4All navigation shut down by Navteq (nav4all.nl)

lzandman writes: One of the largest provider of free mobile navigation solutions, Dutch company Nav4All, is forced to shut down its business in three days because map provider Navteq has revoked its license "in a totally unexpected manner". Navteq is a 100% Nokia subsidiary and as you may know Nokia is currently launching its own free mobile navigation software. That's a nice way to end competition...
GNU is Not Unix

Denmark Chooses OpenDocument Format 198

Seahawk was one of several readers to write in with news of Denmark's decision to embrace ODF. "On Friday morning Denmark decided to choose ODF over Microsoft's OOXML. For now the decision is only effective for governmental institutions, but regions and municipalities will most likely follow some time in the future. The decision has unfolded over a period of four years, and many open source advocates were fearing the worst, but it looks like the minister finally caved in and listened to what a lot of people were saying." While in transition away from Microsoft Office formats, the Danes may find use for this new OpenOffice integration guide (sent in by reader AdeleWard).

Australia Bans Small Breasts In Adult Films Screenshot-sm 8

mariushm writes "The Australian Sex Party (ASP) said Wednesday that the Australian Classification Board (ACB) is now banning depictions of small-breasted women in adult publications and films. It comes just a week after it was found that material with depictions of females ejaculating during orgasm are now Refused Classification and Australian Customs directed to confiscate it. The National Classification Code dictates that anything that describes or depicts a person who is, or appears to be, a child under 18 (whether the person is engaged in sexual activity or not) in a way that is likely to cause offense to a reasonable adult is Refused Classification." First they crack down on cartoon porn, and now this. It must be arbitrary sex law week in Australia.

Canon Files For DSLR Iris Registration Patent 273

An anonymous reader writes "Canon has filed for a patent for using iris watermarking (as in the iris of your eye) to take photographer's copyright protection to the next level. You set up the camera to capture an image of your eye through the viewfinder. Once captured, this biological reference is embedded as metadata into every photo you take. Canon claims this will help with copyright infringement of photos online."

Hubble Finds a Galaxy 12.8 Billion Years Old 134

I Don't Believe in Imaginary Property writes "Hubble's Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) has discovered the 12.8B year old galaxy now known as A1689-zD1. Using gravitational lensing of the massive Abell 1689 cluster of galaxies, they were able to find a surprisingly bright young galaxy from only 700 million years after the Big Bang, during the cosmic 'dark ages.' Researchers are itching to study the object with the upcoming Atacama Large Millimeter Array (to go online in 2012) and James Webb Space Telescope (to launch in 2013)."

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