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Comment Re:Opposite (Score 4, Interesting) 504

I was thinking that I won't be able to retire the way things are.

Nor I. But when I was 25 I thought I would retire at 55 (and actually all things remaining equal, my plan and habits would have enabled it). But all things do not remain equal. Unexpected, previously undesirable and sometimes unforeseeable things happen in life: wives, children, crashing economies, jobs constantly being shifted overseas, etc.

I guess this aspect of millennial thinking isn't new or scary. As with all of us, life will grind away hopes and dreams, no action is required from us.

Comment Re: How to copy? (Score 1) 169

It's not clear, but speculated that with chip and sign, it is entirely possible:
https://www.wired.com/2015/09/...

However, what has actually happened is that most fraudsters, who are as technically capable as your average script kiddie, have just found other ways of defrauding you rather than try to solve a hard technical problem. The most popular method now, and which I personally know many people have been facing, is opening a credit card in your name and using your potentially great credit score against you. This is ALSO because credit card companies are dropping the ball.

This is why we should not let idiots with MBA degrees use statistics to make decisions. "If I make this one change, I will fix 60% of the problem! I'm done!", and a month later the mole pops up another hole. So no doubt they will try to close this new hole, and the criminal element will look elsewhere, perhaps back at cracking EMV and it's known weaknesses, one of which has been identified:

http://blog.unibulmerchantserv...
(TL;DR: It's not guaranteed and work for some uses, but it's a crack in the wall)

Comment Re:That's the point... (Score 1) 148

When you're working 20 hours a day, 7 days a week, what do you do? If you can't trust the coworker to do the work, he needs to go and be replaced with someone who is going to share the workload with you. This is your job, it's the means by which you feed yourself and your family, it's not yearbook club. Deadbeats can't just hang out, they're soaking up resources that someone else may better utilize.

Comment Re:CCing is a legit intimidation technique (Score 2) 148

Or, if you are asking a peer who you do not manage and has his own tasks, to do something you ask, you CC the boss who will resolve priorities. Or, if you talked to the boss and he asked you to ask peer to do said thing, you CC the boss. Generally I expect the boss to be controlling resources and managing priorities, he really ought to be copied on a lot of mails. If that peer is doing exceptional work that he doesn't even have to do, CC'ing the boss is also the way of making sure the boss knows said person is doing really well, I also CC the boss on that sort of thing. I want good people to be incentivized to stay every bit as much as I want to help identify bad people who can be incentivized to leave.

I was nervous about people CCing the boss when I was fresh out of college, but I got over it the hard way. The consequence of NOT CC'ing the boss, in my experience, is people not delivering and the boss blaming ME, and asking why he wasn't CC'd. So now any time I am making a request that involves real work, and asking someone to stop doing what they're doing, I CC the boss.

Honestly the only person with a legitimate reason to complain about CC'ing the boss, is the boss. That has never happened.

Comment Re:Always pointing at hardware (Score 1) 168

if you're running a newer laptop and can't handle multiple spreadsheets, the problem isn't the hardware

I don't entirely disagree that a lot of problem is bloat in SW, it's out of control. However, many, many employers buy new laptops that are cheap but have lousy processors, inadequate memory, horrible video chips (i.e. Intel default) low res displays and small hard disks. That really is a HW problem.

The first thing I do is drop the engineer card, and find the process for getting a top of the line laptop (or best: desktop). So far I've never been rejected. However most employees cannot do that, and I can imagine their fustration since engineering in the corporate world is still 90% bullshit spreadsheets and word docs, 9% cleaning up management induced technical mess, and 1% actual design. I survive that 90% by having multiple spreadsheets, documents and browser tabs open at once, along with email that is always on (and using insane memory due to the 1000s of emails that come to me a week). I also use multiple displays, so that I can have many of these up at the same time, making cut'n'paste work a whole lot faster.

I do not know how the marketing dolts get by, but I always assumed someone handed them a basket and some wicker and told them quitting time is 5pm sharp.

Comment Get TED some oxygen (Score 1) 262

TED remains breathlessly naïve, and seems to want to relegate itself to those facebook posts by people who quote never heard of poets making meaningful comments about the feels.

Ideas are worth precisely shit. Ideas+execution shape the future. Execution is frequently heavily influenced by politicians who make the rules that govern the corporate and legal landscape in which your execution may take place, if it isn't strictly forbidden, construed as patent infringing (esp. by trolls), defunded by competitive interests or otherwise squashed, stolen or prevented.

Politicians are not the only problem, to be sure, access to capital required to execute is also a major issue, but one in which politicians are paid to play in less.

Comment Re:Maybe if you're single (Score 5, Insightful) 207

One reason I avoid working from home is that I trust my coworkers in the office to let me work more than I trust my wife and my kids to let me work.

Unfortunately, I trust them far LESS than my young children to leave me the hell alone. Instead it's either bug me at my cube, or if I find a place to hide, call a meeting and bug me there. I produce substantial documentation to ensure they don't need to bug me, but they don't read it, and bug me.

If I could work from home, I definitely would.

Comment Re:Simple math... (Score 5, Interesting) 339

Because we're idiots.

No we're not, we're just ignorant. The charismatic narcissists tell a good story, they tell us they can fix it, they tell us they understand what's wrong, they relate well to us to the point we think they also see what we see and they can fix it. That's politics, but these same people succeed in business to for the same reason, except they merely need to swindle a considerably smaller group of people.

The guy who tells the truth, that we have bad problems and they may not be entirely fixable, or that the middle class must necessarily bear the lions share of the tax burden, or that many of our perceived problems are more about not making the huge profits from WWII reparations that our parents benefitted from, and instead having huge debt from various police actions since then which we shouldered the costs for, that while there is a better way to live our country is largely ruled by a small group of wealthy self-interested pricks that we cannot effectively stop all at once, but must work collectively, both nationally and internationally to ensure they such people do not have a place on earth in the future.

Do you want to vote for that guy? He's probably right, but his story is depressing and he's telling us uncomfortable things.

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