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Submission + - SPAM: Parsing JSON is a Minefield

Ardisson writes: Here is a test of several JSON parsers with a custom test suite of 300+ files, in which there's no two parsers that exhibit the very same behaviour.

JSON is not a data format you can rely on blindly. I've demonstrated this by showing that the standard definition is spread out over at least six different documents (section 1), that the latest and most complete document, RFC-7159, is imprecise and contradictory (section 2), and by crafting test files that out of over 30 parsers, no two parsers parsed the same set of documents the same way (section 4).

The test results matrix is particularly telling.
Link to Original Source

Privacy

Submission + - iPhone Privacy Issues (seriot.ch)

Ardisson writes: Swiss iPhone developer Nicolas Seriot presented last night a talk on iPhone Privacy in Geneva. He showed how a malicious application could harvest personal data on a non jailbroken iPhone and without using private APIs. It turns out that the email accounts, the keyboard cache content and the wifi connection logs are fully accessible. The talk puts up several recommandations. There is also a demo project on github http://github.com/nst/spyphone/.
The Courts

Oregon Judge Says RIAA Made 'Honest Mistake,' Allows Subpoena 175

NewYorkCountryLawyer writes "In Arista v. Does 1-17, the RIAA's case targeting students at the University of Oregon, the Oregon Attorney General's motion to quash the RIAA's subpoena — pending for about a year — has reached a perplexing conclusion. The Court agreed with the University that the subpoena, as worded, imposed an undue burden on the University by requiring it to produce 'sufficient information to identify alleged infringers,' which would have required the University to 'conduct an investigation,' but then allowed the RIAA to subpoena the identities of 'persons associated by dorm room occupancy or username with the 17 IP addresses listed' even though those people may be completely innocent. In his 8-page decision (PDF), the Judge also 'presumed' the RIAA lawyers' misrepresentations were an 'honest mistake,' made no reference at all to the fact, pointed out by the Attorney General, that the RIAA investigators (Safenet, formerly MediaSentry) were not licensed, rejected all of the AG's privacy arguments under both state and federal law, and rejected the AG's request for discovery into the RIAA's investigative tactics."

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