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Submission + - Worst Mass Shooting in U.S. History (cnn.com) 17

An anonymous reader writes: From CNN:

"Fifty people were killed inside Pulse, a gay nightclub, Orlando Police Chief John Mina and other officials said Sunday morning, just hours after a shooter opened fire in the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. At least 53 more people were injured, Mina said. Police have shot and killed the gunman, he told reporters.

The shooter is not from the Orlando area, Mina said. He has been identified as Omar Saddiqui Mateen, 29, of Fort Pierce, about 120 miles southeast of Orlando, two law enforcement officials tell CNN.
Orlando authorities said they consider the violence an act of domestic terror. The FBI is involved. While investigators are exploring all angles, they "have suggestions the individual has leanings towards (Islamic terrorism), but right now we can't say definitely," said Ron Hopper, assistant special agent in charge of the FBI's Orlando bureau."

Submission + - Apple Has First Earnings Decline In More Than A Decade (go.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apple has announced its first-ever decline in revenue in the past 13 years as its iPhone sales have slowed down. Apple posted quarterly revenue of $50.6 billion and quarterly net income of $10.5 billion. Last year, the company posted revenue of $58 billion and net income of $13.6 billion. The reason Apple has been so successful is because of the iPhone, which was first released in 2007. What goes up must come down — and we're starting to see that now. The success of the iPhone is starting plateau and ultimately decrease now that consumers are finding less of a reason to upgrade to the latest and greatest smartphone. Apple CEO Tim Cook pointed to weakening currencies worldwide as one of the obstacles the company would face as iPhone sales were up less than 1 percent year-over-year last quarter. Gene Munster, managing director and senior research analyst at Piper Jaffray, told ABC News, "This has been anticipated for three months now. The reason is nothing [that] is wrong with the iPhone." Munster said this is not worrisome to Apple and that iPhone sales will likely increase by the end of the year when the next iPhone(s) is released.

Submission + - How Jenkins is building up a world of Continuous Integration (sdtimes.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It's been a long road for the Jenkins Project, but its growth reflects the growth of Continuous Integration and Deployment. Today, Jenkins is maintained by more than 600 contributors, and when it comes to CI/CD, it's by far the most popular. The most recent major change of Jenkins is Jenkins 2.0: pipelines to production. The Jenkins project is an enabler of more than just CI, it's an enabler for DevOps as a whole, said Sacha Labourey, CEO and founder of CloudBees, and as soon as people expand the scope to have a more CI approach, Jenkins expands to DevOps and to QA.

Submission + - Things Sysadmins and Developers Would Change About One Another

Esther Schindler writes: Even in the best of organizations, the development and operations departments have friction. Each has its own goals, metrics for success, and team culture. Plus, ops is in the business of making things predictable and unchanging, while developers are in the business of changing everything. Those opposing priorities make it harder for dev and ops to communicate freely. Despite the industry’s ongoing efforts to bring the communities together, developers continue to grumble about ops, who simultaneously grumble about devs.

Grumbling doesn’t help to resolve the tension (or desire to throttle someone). Understanding does. So both developers and sysadmins were asked to imagine that they were granted a single wish: You have the power to give your company’s [ops team | development team] an understanding of one thing — just one thing — that currently irks you. What spell would you cast with that magic wand?

The results are in two articles: 3 Way Ops Can Help Devs: A Developer Perspective and 3 Ways Devs Can Help Ops: An Operations Perspective. Maybe it's not surprising that the shared component is: Listen to each other more. Share what you're up to, and what the goal is. (Kumbaya optional.)

But maybe some of the specifics can help you grok where the other folks are coming from. For instance:

As a developer named John writes, “Software development sometimes needs to be allowed to bend the rules/regulations in order to operate efficiently/quickly. Too many times, the rules (e.g., who has access, when, what can be installed, etc.) cause ridiculous delays in cycle time for development or support.”

and

A classic example is when developers assume always-on connectivity. “The network is not a static monolith that never changes,” one ops staffer noted. “We’re planning a data center network upgrade. It will require disconnecting every server and reconnecting them to the new switches.” That could cause some apps to think the entire world has ended and crash in an untidy heap.

Would you have included different magic spells?

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