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Submission + - Github removes hosting of downloadable binaries (github.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Apparently open source software is no longer meant for the 99% of population that knows what a zip file is but not how to compile from source — at least, according to Github. The previously existing option to upload precompiled binaries has been removed — from now on everyone is on their own regarding hosting of binaries if they have any interest in their software being actually used be mere mortals.

Submission + - Guatemala judge orders McAfee released (google.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A lawyer for John McAfee said Tuesday a judge has ordered the software company founder released from a Guatemalan detention center where he has been fighting being returned to Belize.
Hardware

Submission + - Raspberry Pi's $25 Model A Hits Production Line (paritynews.com)

hypnosec writes: The Raspberry Pi Foundation has announced that the cheaper variant of the Raspberry Pi – Model A, has entered production phase. Model A of the credit-card sized computer has been stripped off its Ethernet port and a USB port thus leaving just one USB port. This model comes with 256MB RAM but, as it is less complex compared to its predecessor it will consume lesser power thus opening up quite a few new usage scenarios. The Foundation has posted the first image of the $25 Model A on its site and noted “We’re anticipating that those of you who buy the Model A will be using it for different applications from Model B owners.”

Submission + - Syrian Malware Servers Survive, Then Die (slashdot.org)

Nerval's Lobster writes: "A massive outage knocked Syria’s Internet offline Nov. 29—with the exception of five servers implicated in serving malware earlier this year. But the next day, those five servers went dark as well. Internet analytics firm Renesys suggested late Nov. 29 that those five servers were likely offshore. “Now, there are a few Syrian networks that are still connected to the Internet, still reachable by traceroutes, and indeed still hosting Syrian content,” the company wrote in a blog post. “These are five networks that use Syrian-registered IP space, but the originator of the routes is actually Tata Communications. These are potentially offshore, rather than domestic, and perhaps not subject to whatever killswitch was thrown today within Syria.” By the morning of Nov. 30, those five servers went offline. “The last 5 networks belonging to Syria, a set of smaller netblocks previously advertised by Tata Communications, have been torn down and are no longer routed,” Renesys wrote."

Submission + - 4E6th Comment (slashdot.org)

An anonymous reader writes: Slashdot recorded it's 4 millionth comment sometime during the last 24 hours. Anyone else notice?

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