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Comment Re:easy. (Score 1) 842

My coding philosophy has always been to keep the code as simple as possible. Especially after being the victim of so many over engineered pieces of programming.

When I first left Uni I went to a big defence contracting company and went from graduate programmer to work area lead in 8 weeks, as much out of circumstance as capability (ie there was no one else to take the position of that work area lead). I did good work, and just as importantly (as I was told my management during my work review) by being a happy person and having good morale that brushed off onto others. No matter what stress we were under I just went around be happy and relaxed laughing and whatnot. At other jobs people have also commented on how it was nice having someone around that wasn't acting all stressed out during the crunch times.

Happy and helpful. Thats what I have always been at my jobs, and it works.
Businesses

What the Top US Companies Pay In Taxes 658

theodp writes "If you've ever wondered how it's possible that you pay more to the IRS than General Electric, Forbes has an explanation. You, my friend, do not have the tax benefit of overseas operations. Microsoft, for example, has its overseas subsidiaries license software to its US parent company in return for handsome royalties that get taxed at lower overseas rates. Exxon limits its tax pain with the help of 20 wholly owned subsidiaries domiciled in the Bahamas, Bermuda, and the Cayman Islands that shelter cash flow from operations in the likes of Angola, Azerbaijan, and Abu Dhabi. As a result, of the $15B it paid in income taxes last year, Exxon paid none of it to Uncle Sam, and has tens of billions in earnings permanently reinvested overseas. Likewise, GE has $84B in overseas income parked indefinitely outside the US. Now quit your carping and get back to filling out that 1040!"
Medicine

Depression May Provide Cognitive Advantages 512

Hugh Pickens writes "Paul W. Andrews and J. Anderson Thomson, Jr. argue in Scientific American that although depression is considered a mental disorder, depression may in fact be a mental adaptation which provides real benefits. This is not to say that depression is not a problem. Depressed people often have trouble performing everyday activities, they can't concentrate on their work, they tend to socially isolate themselves, they are lethargic, and they often lose the ability to take pleasure from such activities such as eating and sex. So what could be so useful about depression? 'Depressed people often think intensely about their problems,' write the authors. 'These thoughts are called ruminations; they are persistent and depressed people have difficulty thinking about anything else. Numerous studies have also shown that this thinking style is often highly analytical. They dwell on a complex problem, breaking it down into smaller components, which are considered one at a time.' Various studies have found that people in depressed mood states are better at solving social dilemmas and there is evidence that people who get more depressed while they are working on complex problems in an intelligence test tend to score higher on the test (PDF). 'When one considers all the evidence, depression seems less like a disorder where the brain is operating in a haphazard way, or malfunctioning. Instead, depression seems more like the vertebrate eye — an intricate, highly organized piece of machinery that performs a specific function.'"
Media

CoS Bigwig Likens Wikipedia Ban to Nazis' Yellow Star Decree 567

We mentioned on Thursday that Wikipedia has banned edits originating from certain IP addresses belonging to the Church of Scientology; reader newtley writes now that Scientology leader (CEO and Chairman of the Board of the linked, but legally separate, Religious Technology Center) David Miscavige calls the ban "a 'despicable hate crime,' and asks, 'What's next, will Scientologists have to wear yellow, six-pointed stars on our clothing?' During World War II, Hitler forced Jewish men, women and children to wear a a yellow cloth star bearing the word Jude to brand them in the streets of Europe, and in the Nazi death camps."
Movies

Submission + - The last of Uwe Boll?

SatanicPuppy writes: "According to Reuters, Uwe Boll, the German director the critics love to hate, will return to low-budget filmmaking now that his latest and biggest production, the $70 million fantasy epic "In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale," bombed at the North American box office. The tax shelter loopholes that funded the previous films have been banned in Germany, making further large budget films unlikely."
Windows

Submission + - Windows Home Server corrupts files (computerworld.com)

crustymonkey writes: "From the article:

Microsoft Corp. has warned Windows Home Server users not to edit files stored on their backup systems with several of its programs, including Vista Photo Gallery and Office's OneNote and Outlook, as well as files generated by popular finance software such as Quicken and QuickBooks.
Don't back up you files to Windows Home Server as recommended by Microsoft themselves according to this article. I'm not exactly what the point is in having a home server if you can't backup files on it."

Windows

Submission + - HFS+ For Windows (bizzeh.com) 2

Bizzeh writes: "their are one or to ways that i know of to access HFS+ (Mac OS) partitions in windows (e.g. MacDrive, HFSExplorer), but in general, they are terrible. are their any GOOD file system drivers for HFS+ for windows (2k/xp/vista), prefairably free ones?"

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