Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Books

Asimov Estate Authorizes New I, Robot Books 426

daria42 writes "In a move guaranteed to annoy long-term science fiction fans, the estate of legendary science fiction author Isaac Asimov, who passed away in 1992, has authorized a trilogy of sequels to his beloved I, Robot short story series, to be written by relatively unknown fantasy author Mickey Zucker Reichert. The move is already garnering opposition online. 'Isaac Asimov died forty years after they were first written. If he had wanted to follow them up, he would have. The author's intentions need to be respected here,' writes sci-fi/fantasy book site Keeping the Door."

Comment Re:Nice excuse (Score 1) 181

This is like the worst excuse ever. How can they release a software product and not have the source code?? It's not like you can compile flow charts into usable software before you finish writing the code. If the code compiles fine, it's just a matter of publishing it (you don't even have to make it pretty). Any takes on the matter?

Cellphones

Game Development On Android 211

Gamasutra is running an article about the state of game development on Android. The author explains some of the strengths and weaknesses of the platform, and makes comparisons to development on the iPhone. Quoting: "While iPhone apps are written in Objective C, the Android SDK uses relatively more programmer-friendly Java. The iPhone store charges developers $99 a year to distribute their apps, while Android has a one-time $25 fee for developers. And the review process for iPhone apps grows increasingly lengthy — sometimes weeks or more — and it's somewhat arcane. Android apps go live as soon as the developer hits the publish button. Google handles the review process post-hoc, and is much more lax in terms of content. ... For now, if a developer decides to implement a game exclusively for a particular smartphone platform, and the choice is between the iPhone and Android, the tradeoff is between trying to get noticed in an incredibly crowded and competitive market where the potential payoff is huge for those at the top, or entering a market with low barriers, little competition, currently low returns, but the possibility of potential growth."
Google

Microsoft Says Google Chrome Frame Makes IE Less Secure 459

Mark writes "The release of Google Chrome Frame, a new open source plugin that injects Chrome's renderer and JavaScript engine into Microsoft's browser, earlier this week had many web developers happily dancing long through the night. Finally, someone had found a way to get Internet Explorer users up to speed on the Web. Microsoft, on the other hand, is warning IE users that it does not recommend installing the plugin. What does the company have against the plugin? It makes Internet Explorer less secure. 'With Internet Explorer 8, we made significant advancements and updates to make the browser safer for our customers,' a Microsoft spokesperson told Ars. 'Given the security issues with plugins in general and Google Chrome in particular, Google Chrome Frame running as a plugin has doubled the attack area for malware and malicious scripts. This is not a risk we would recommend our friends and families take.'"
Networking

Large-Scale Mac Deployment? 460

UncleRage writes "I've been asked to research and ultimately recommend a deployment procedure for Macs across a rather large network. I'm not a stranger to OS X; however, the last time I worked on deployment NetRestore was still king of the mountain. Considering the current options, what methodologies do admins adhere to? Given the current selection of tools available, what would you recommend when planning, prototyping, and rolling out a robust, modular deployment scenario? For the record, I'm not asking for a spoon-fed solution; I'm more interested in a discussion concerning the current tools and what may (or may not) have worked for you. There are a lot of options available for modular system deployment... what are your opinions?"
Privacy

Trust an Insurance Company's "Drive-Cam?" 480

ramen99 writes "Our new car insurance company offered us discounts for our teenage driver if we agree to install a 'drive-cam' that records driving habits and wirelessly transmits video footage to a 'neutral driving coach' for evaluation and comment. While this might be great to monitor a new teen driver, it will also monitor other adult drivers. The insurance company claims that they would never use any information obtained to consider changes in insurance rates, but that really sounds unbelievable. Would you give up your privacy to save some dough? Installation is free, and the camera mounts just under the rear-view mirror. Something seems fishy about this..." Especially when, according to a British insurance firm, computer engineers are most likely to crash (sent in by antdude).

Comment Re:If you don't see a problem with that, (Score 1) 454

Hey Sparrow, if you think IDing yourself is the same as "being tracked" or having to prove you are innocent of any given crime, you have issues buddy. I just said it as an example, as i, for one, have never had to proof my identity to the police, but if they required me to do it, i'd do it. That retarded way of thinking of yours is why there are so many problems of identity theft in the US, and so very very little here in Spain. I'll stick with our way of doing things. Thank you very much

Comment Re:Interesting Discussion (Score 4, Funny) 346

That reminded me of the times I played Lemmings in my 386. Whenever i got bored or frustrated I would just put two lemmings in "guard" mode right where they came out into the level, and after getting them all packed into the 3 or 4 pixels left between the guards, I would hit the suicide button and watch all of those lemmings blow up. It was like fireworks! Pretty fireworks!

Slashdot Top Deals

"Old age and treachery will beat youth and skill every time." -- a coffee cup

Working...